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Camping Stoves

Discussion in 'Backcountry' started by janus, Jun 22, 2005.

  1. mr

    mr Part of the Furniture Ski Pass: Gold

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    I reckon it took me 10 goes to be comfortable with my whisperlite. And 100 cooking events to 'master' it. I think my eyebrows went on the ninth go. Beware the complacency of being intermediate.
     
  2. janus

    janus One of Us

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    The main thing is to let it heat up properly when you prime it, and to ensure you don't turn it on full blast straight away isn't it?
     
  3. janus

    janus One of Us

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    please, any advice would be appreciated, I'm hoping the exterience doesn't blind me permanently..
     
  4. Luko

    Luko One of Us

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    I think it was about 10 goes for me to get it right on my whisperlight too. I unfortunately started on kerosine 1st which didnt help. Used nothing but Shellite since and no problems. I still have a friend who still uses his trangia and will never change! All other stoves are too noisy.

    Good luck Janus!
     
  5. Luko

    Luko One of Us

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    *Not sure about Simmerlite stove so following is for whisperlite*

    With the whisperlite it says to fill the priming cup 1/2 full - I think this is too much. As long as the cup is coated, this should be enough. Otherwise you will be waiting for 10 mins before the fuel burns off!

    Once the flame is small and almost out, turn the stove on. It should start fine. if it starts buring with a huge flame, turn it right down (not off) and wait till it starts to burn correctly.

    Simmerlite Guide (3.8MB)
     
    #155 Luko, Jul 26, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 17, 2013
  6. janus

    janus One of Us

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    On the instructions for the simmerlite it says you can use the priming cup if there's no wind, or alternatively you can release some fuel and just light the jet..

    Also only meant to pump 10-15 times as opposed to the whisperlite which I beleive in meant to be pumped much more
     
  7. Luko

    Luko One of Us

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    Yeah, whisperlite needs 15-20 if full or 40-55 if half full.
     
    #157 Luko, Jul 26, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 17, 2013
  8. Shrek

    Shrek Old n' Crusty

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    practise the pumping, you will get a feel for the rigth amount of pressure for the stove to run right.
     
  9. mr

    mr Part of the Furniture Ski Pass: Gold

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    Janus, janus, do you live? Please report in, we're worried.

    Mr bungle is right, the priming cup should just get wet, not anywhere near half full. I turn it on, listen for the little tickly sound of the fuel coming out, and then turn it off straight away, and light (with all the shields in place).
     
  10. janus

    janus One of Us

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    Well, I made it!

    As far as the priming goes, I didn't realise it would work so quickly, only about 15-20 seconds and I could turn it on. The first attempt when I primed it the flame actually went out, then the next time when it got down to a small blue flame I turned the valve and presto it kicked into action. I didn't use the priming cup. Anyway, I boiled a pot of water in a couple of minutes, it puts out some solid BTU. I pumped it 15 times (the bottle was full to the line), couldn't get anything close to a simmer though, will have to practice a bit more, probably with the fuel bottle full I only need to pump 5-10 times max. When I emptied the fuel bottle after using it had only sucked down about 6mm for 5 minutes use, so pretty damn happy with the fuel efficiency.

    As far as the fuel goes, I poured it back into the bottle as I probably wont be using the stove for another month or so, can anyone tell me, does it matter if I just leave the pump in the fuel bottle with fuel in it? Or will this degrade the o rings faster? When people head out back do they generally keep the pump seperate to the fuel bottle, or just leave it in the whole time?

    I did have some serious flames coming out of the stove for the first 5 seconds of priming, though I do still have my eyebrows [​IMG]
     
    #160 janus, Jul 27, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 11, 2013
  11. mr

    mr Part of the Furniture Ski Pass: Gold

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    Hooray! I always take the pump out of the bottle and put the proper lid on the bottle. Leakages in pack would be disastrous. Also reduces the possibility of in-pack damage to pump, as bottles tend to get jammed down hard in pack. I leave pump in the little bag with folded up stove. Others may care to differ.
     
  12. janus

    janus One of Us

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    Ah, ok. As far as hygeine in the BC, I was thinking that a chamoise would probably be a good thing to clean the pots/cutlery etc... what do you guys use?
     
  13. Kieran

    Kieran A Local

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    About 1/4 of one of those green scouring pads (sometimes) and snow. It's usually really good and abrasive.
     
  14. janus

    janus One of Us

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  15. snowshoe_fiend

    snowshoe_fiend Hard Yards

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    Janus, I always use the proper lid to the bottle. I also tend to drain the little bit of unused fuel onto the ground (which I know is environmentally unfriendly) in case there are any contaminants or particles in it from the stove which could come back and block the stove. Does anyone else do this, or does everyone just drain it back into the bottle?
     
  16. PK Sawd

    PK Sawd Part of the Furniture Ski Pass: Gold

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    I pour the unused fuel back into the fuel bottle. There is a filter on the intake to the pump unit so I've never been too bothered and it hasn't caused me trouble in 15 years. I have also never used the original lid to the fuel bottle, choosing always to leave the pump in. Again, no trouble.
     
  17. janus

    janus One of Us

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    So PK, how long have you left fuel in the bottle with the pump?
     
  18. Luko

    Luko One of Us

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    I've always left the fuel in the bottle with pump. Have left it in there for close to 6 months before and have had no problems when I go to use it next.
     
  19. mr

    mr Part of the Furniture Ski Pass: Gold

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    I've had 2 pumps bust. First time was my fault, let pump cup dry out during non-use period, used too much oil, and then applied too much pressure (happens when your hungry). 2nd one replaced the first and was defect. Got full replacement.

    I would just hate a bit of friction to twiddle the knob and have shellite / kero / unleaded in my pack, which is the main reason to swap lids. I guess i pay the 2 gram penalty of 2 lids!
     
  20. gusc

    gusc Hard Yards

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    When I'm using the stove for the last time, I just turn off the valve on the pump rather than the stove, which burns up most of the fuel in the line. (OK for stoves with separate simmer control.) I've always left pump in bottle on trips without problems, being careful to pack it well away from food in my pack.

    Whoa, how to clean one's pots - slow down, new thread!! I mean, surely we can beat 7 pages by arguing brillo pads vs. chux? [​IMG] My soap-impregnated scourer is called Toxic and just loves coming on trip after trip with me. Although I'm considering moving to lightweight camping: just hunt down anything I can find in the BC and eat it raw directly off the ground... No stove, no washing (but possibly no dinner too).
     
    #170 gusc, Jul 27, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 17, 2013
  21. Simonn

    Simonn First Runs

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    hmmmmm

    This MSR stuff is all rather involved, isn't it..??

    whereas:

    no pumping problems, no priming problems, not worried about O rings... (although still need to clean the pots..)

    "Trangias: not just quiet!"
     
  22. legend

    legend One of Us

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    There seems little talk of the the Coleman Dual Fuel type stoves (runs on shellite and unleaded). No priming required, very safe for use in vestibules, don't need to cook outside when a blizz is blowing, nothing to assemble (and hope it has been connected correctly when cold, wet and exhausted).
     
  23. Majikthise

    Majikthise Sage Moderator Ski Pass: Gold

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    and easy to control. The coleman does a good simmer. I've had my Peak 1 for about 10 years and more often than not it has been the main stove for cooking, when there has been more than one stove with us... with the MSR relegated to water boiler.
     
  24. PaulM

    PaulM First Runs

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    I've got a Primus Himalaya MFS that has had its (second) pump in its fuel bottle now for at least 5 years. No problems. I like the Primus pump better than the MSRs. Alloy - more robust, won't melt (I've seen a couple of MSRs with very sick looking pumps from being left too close) and not any heavier.

    Paul
     
    #174 PaulM, Jul 28, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 17, 2013
  25. PK Sawd

    PK Sawd Part of the Furniture Ski Pass: Gold

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    I've left fuel and pump in bottle for many months between trips. No trouble.

    Driving a car is a complex operation when you get right down to it. I'll race you to Sydney. I'll drive and you can walk.

    Author's note: message not intended for people already living in or near Sydney........... doh!
     
  26. kaiser

    kaiser First Runs

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    I always take the pump out of the bottle and put the cap back in when not using the stove. Mainly the very little weight penalty combined with the fuel bottle always going in the bottom of the pack means I feel safer that way. Would not like to be halfway through a hike and have wrecked the pump on my stove, and also hate the thought of shellite through everything in my pack.


    Trangia: Quiet, slow and Inefficient-Your Choice
     
  27. Donski B

    Donski B First Runs

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    After years of having epics with a lemon of a whisperlite (always having to ***** the jets, problems getting pressure, flares, having the fuel line split up at altitude in the himalayas, and just having to fiddle with the bastard on every trip no matter how many times it had been cleaned)....I went to the dark side and bought a coleman dual fuel. It has been a great decision. The stove has had 12 years of good service providing you replace the generator every couple of years. One trip the generator went on us.... pretty bad timing too as we were camped up at Dead Horse Gap on a very very very cold night (two litre water bottle froze up solid inside the tent).
    I have forgiven the stove and just do the maintenance to make sure I can always have a hot cuppa in the snow. The only problem is that you can't fly with these stoves - unless you just forget to tell the airline you have it in your luggage. Airlines freak out about them and it doesn't matter if you've emptied the tank and had it air for hours, they just get one whiff of the petrol and then try to confiscate the stove. So be warned. :no:
     
  28. dusty

    dusty First Runs

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    Colemans are a great stove forget MSR's
     
  29. Majikthise

    Majikthise Sage Moderator Ski Pass: Gold

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    Donski, I've had no problem with my generator, I've replaced the pump washer and that's it in 10+ years. My plane tactic is to drain , dry the stove in the sun with the cap off, then when at the airport go to the bathroom and smear soap around the rim of the tank. I always carry on and leave the cap off. I've never had any problem.
     
  30. mr

    mr Part of the Furniture Ski Pass: Gold

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    Exactly that tactic worked for me in many many airports until Vancouver - "would passenger m**** r***** please come to security" (2 mins before boarding). More soap, some shampoo and half-filled with water did the trick. ALWAYS carry on.
     
  31. janus

    janus One of Us

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    Cranked it up again last night, found that with a half bottle of fuel I only need to pump it about 5 times if I want the stove to simmer, and only abou t8-10 times for full pressure.

    One of the legs scrapes the fuel tube (which runs around the burner) when I open the legs out or close them, don't think it'll be an issue though.

    It doesn't use much fuel at all, 15 minutes of burning used about 1cm out of the tank.
     
  32. PK Sawd

    PK Sawd Part of the Furniture Ski Pass: Gold

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    I printed out a copy of the IAAF regulations before flying with the stove. There are two methods that are there described as being sufficient to make the apparatus safe for travel. Make sure you have performed one of them and can vouch for having done so. Individual airlines might choose to apply different criteria, as they have a right to do so, but I also looked at the Qantas regulations and they quote the IAAF regulations. No-body queried it on a recent flight to Melbourne-Perth return.
     
  33. Donski B

    Donski B First Runs

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    hey guys, thanks for the tips... I'll print out those regs and see. However, I can just see airport security think a coleman is a mini-bomb in carry on luggage!!

    The last time we flew with Jet Star and surly Ms Check-In was not up to discussing stove regulations but if I have them printed out and highlighted, my case might be heard. Such a bummer arriving at your destination and having to go to a gear store and buy another stove - ended up buying a butane/propane jobbie for the sea-kaying trip... luckily Hobart had a gear shop open on a sunday afternoon!!
     
  34. janus

    janus One of Us

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    Sounds like you've done some cool stuff Donski B, Himalayas, kayaking Tassie, what else?
     
  35. rabble

    rabble First Runs

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    Is this the sort of thing that would work?

    Coleman Exponent Feather 442 Dual Fuel Backpacking Stove on rei.com for $US49.95 + shipping.


    [​IMG]


    Or should it be something like this: Brunton Optimus Nova Multi-Fuel Stove
    US$130.00 + shipping


    [​IMG]
     
    #185 rabble, Jul 29, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 11, 2013
  36. legend

    legend One of Us

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    The Coleman Exponent Feather 442 Dual Fuel is what many VMTC members use, especially on our ski trips. Easy to use inside tent vestibules (may flare up a little on first lighting it (yellow flame, quite cool, can wave your hand through it without singeing hairs), but it is liquid fuel that is burning, not the superheated shellite gas that produces a very hot blue flame. It takes about 15-30 secs to produce the blue hot flame.
     
  37. rabble

    rabble First Runs

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    Thanks legend - helpful info [​IMG]
     
    #187 rabble, Jul 30, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 11, 2013
  38. telemarx

    telemarx A Local

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    Does the 10 page rule count in BC?
     
  39. Ziggy

    Ziggy A Local Ski Pass: Gold

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    as a btw, for the odd individual who invested in a SIGG Firejet, discontinued in 2000, a source of replacement leather pump washers (and other parts) is

    http://www.base-camp.co.uk/

    T.W. Sands in Melbourne used to have something that fitted but no longer.

    The life of the washer can be extended by removing and draining the pump between uses and treating the washer with some leather conditioner.
     
    #189 Ziggy, Sep 4, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 14, 2013
  40. Shrek

    Shrek Old n' Crusty

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    ill just delete all your posts, that should make us safe.
    love my dragonfly [​IMG]
     
    #190 Shrek, Sep 5, 2005
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  41. Bugski

    Bugski A Local

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    Great, great thread. :clap: Needs to be archived when it's over.
     
  42. Simonn

    Simonn First Runs

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    Gas Trangia Update

    Back from 5 days in perfect weather on high plains with our Gas/Trangia system. Trangia worked well except first morning when it was around -7 degrees overnight (water bottle freezing in tent)and the gas cylinder needed to be warmed to work well - after that we keept the cylinder in the tent overnight and it was fine.

    Otherwise stove was great and very efficient - took two gas bottles, one of 440g and one 220g - only used about 3/4 of the 440g cylinder (not melting snow though) for 5 days/4 nights.

    (btw - is it possible to get temps after the fact - ie is there an archive of the hourly temps data from Falls somewhere..??)
     
  43. snowshoe_fiend

    snowshoe_fiend Hard Yards

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    Mahtoh, this thread will never be over!
     
  44. Majikthise

    Majikthise Sage Moderator Ski Pass: Gold

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    discussions of bc gear never finish.. telemarx will always want a titanium one.
     
  45. Bugski

    Bugski A Local

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    I see your point.
     
  46. snowshoe_fiend

    snowshoe_fiend Hard Yards

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    Thank you for mentioning titanium, Majikthise. I've always thought that MSR could substantially reduce the weight of the Whisperlite if they made the legs out of titanium wire, and cast the central column out of titanium as well. Nobody would be able to afford to buy it, but it would be a bloody nice stove.
     
  47. telemarx

    telemarx A Local

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    I'd covet one of them.
     
  48. Shaggy

    Shaggy First Runs Endless Winter

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    Meh, whisper lights are crap. The simmerlight is super light, you can simmer on it, and even though it says otherwise, I have tried several types of fuel in it and it works fine.
    Plus, if you cant get your wood fire going, you can use it there too!
    [​IMG]
     
    #198 Shaggy, Sep 6, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 11, 2013
  49. telemark fred

    telemark fred One of Us

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    Covet - Hah! You would just bloody go buy one, then make the rest of us feel all inadequate and jealous. :p
     
    #199 telemark fred, Sep 6, 2005
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  50. telemarx

    telemarx A Local

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    I reckon you are as bad a gear freak as me TF. Difference is you actually get to use yours....my turn to be jealous [​IMG]
     
    #200 telemarx, Sep 6, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 11, 2013