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Catered accommodation options for 2 + a 3 year old?

Discussion in 'Perisher' started by nezumi, Mar 23, 2019.

  1. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    Following on from my more generalised thread, we have had a couple of changes which mean that Perisher is now looking the better option!

    *I have realised/discovered that Perisher allow kids in the 3-6 age group to snowboard in their all-day program!
    *My wife is, sadly, no longer pregnant ( 12 week scan showed that bub wouldn't make it to term, so we said our goodbyes). This means that both the timeframe has widened, and that she is now keen to give this sliding around on snow thing a crack.
    * Biggest thing for her is having the accommodation catered. Having a 3 year old, going out for dinner isn't exactly viable.
    * A secondary concern for accommodation is the ability to get our 3 year old to snow school between 8:30 and 9:00 - and then possibly getting on the skitube to Blue Cow fo a 9:00am lesson? Is that viable, or a fool's errand?

    I have been to Perisher and Thredbo previously, but in both instances it was as part of a group through school/uni, and so I don't know my way around much. I know that last time I went to Thredbo I stayed in Jindy, and I ended up taking (and regretting) a day off, wandering around the town.

    In terms of options, I have looked at Swagman's (seems OK?), Corroboree (A bit pricier than Swagman's, limited availability), Sponars (More facilities than the others, but reliant on a shuttle to get to and from the snow each day) and The Station (cheap - about 1/3rd of Corroboree, but that's before adding in the cost of daily skitube or driving to Perisher).

    Are there any others that I should consider?
     
  2. chicski

    chicski A Local Ski Pass: Gold

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    I’m sorry for your loss :(

    Have you seen this map

    https://www.perisher.com.au/images/village_guide/Village Maps - Perisher green.pdf

    There are lots of club lodges, but with a 3yr old I’d be trying for as close as possible to FV. My brother has stayed at Corroboree with his 3 youngsters, it’s a good location and the rooms looked good. Still be prepared to carry your youngster and gear to/from each day. Lockers are available in Perisher Centre which could save you some grief. I would think the little ones lessons would be at Perisher, they have the indoor centre downstairs in the Perisher Centre.
     
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  3. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Grumblebum Ski Pass: Gold

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    A lot of commercial lodges have their own oversnow transport to shuttle you to and from the lifts. Hans Oversnow used to do afternoon runs for not much money as well - they probably still do.
     
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  4. SMSkier

    SMSkier One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    Try Southern Alps Ski Club. I’m a lodge member there. Lodge name for PV is Kahane. Traditionally a family focused ski club. Breakfasts and dinner provided. The lodge is opposite centre valley on Kosi Road so it’s just a few hundred metres walk back up in the afternoon. Our kids pretty much learned to ski out the front of the lodge.

    https://www.sasc-aus.com
     
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  5. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    I'm guessing we would book as "temporary members"? Or is there a guest option?

    Thanks - once we saw the ultrasound it was pretty much a foregone conclusion, but it's still a case of "what might have been".

    I hadn't seen the map - I was going off the Perisher accommodation page mostly. A number of the places I am looking at appear to offer afternoon oversnow, and swagman's includes morning oversnow too.

    On cost, Barina Milpara is ahead of Swagman's and Matterhorn, but only just - ~$200. Corroboree is another $1,000, according to their website.

    Snowy Gums in Smiggins looks good, but I'm a bit wary of logistics trying to get the 3yo and wife to lessons in time.

    Given that my wife is a first timer, a secondary consideration should probably be the amenity of the accommodation, in terms of how pleasant it is to relax in if she only lasts 4 hours on the snow. :)
     
  6. Doonks

    Doonks Let's cook! Moderator Ski Pass: Gold

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    Lots of people here have been to Snowy Gums. It's a good place. If your wife is a first timer, Smiggins might not be a bad choice at all. Not 100% sure, but I think lessons do start from Smiggins. Check it out

    Snowy Gums also delivers this in Spades
     
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  7. SMSkier

    SMSkier One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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  8. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    The only downside of her taking lessons in Smiggins is that she will be snowboarding, so it might be a bit much to ask her to go straight onto J-bars or T-bars. The cost differential is the main reason for my thinking of Blue Cow ($733) over Front Valley ($880). Smiggins is cheapest of all at $684. (Lift pass, lessons and hire).

    I've also asked a friend who is a Perisher regular. She has stayed at SkiRider and Snowy Gums. She said, surprisingly, that SkiRider wasn't too bad (contrary to most of the comments on here - maybe they have improved things recently?) and that Snowy Gums was lovely.

    I take it that The Station is pretty much a write off, generally speaking? LOL
     
  9. Skiing Gus

    Skiing Gus Hard Yards

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    There is the Kaaten chair at Smiggins. It doesn't get too busy and you can get a good variety of green runs off it (allegedly even blue). Smiggins is a great protected bowl however the one catch is that it does tend to attract school groups in large quantities so it can be a bit interesting there
     
  10. chicski

    chicski A Local Ski Pass: Gold

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    Unload on the triple would be a bit confronting for a first timer. If the kid let lessons are at Perisher, you’ll be stuck on a bus to/from Smiggs. If you can manage the extra, on snow at Perisher will be the least stressful option.
     
  11. bengarden

    bengarden Addicted

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    Perisher Valley Hotel. For getting kids to ski school ( and its even in the same building ) with minimum fuss. And, it makes the start and end to days so much easier. Great breakfast and dinner all fully catered. It's not cheap, but for maximum relaxing when you aren't skiing I think its worth it.....Also easy to jump on the Skitube if you want to get up to Blue Cow
     
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  12. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    Yeouch! Just had a look, even with their stay 5 pay 4 deal, it's still $4,025 for us! Compared to the ~$2,500 most other places want, it's just too rich for me.
     
  13. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Grumblebum Ski Pass: Gold

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    Have a look at Perisher Manor. I have no idea about prices but it is also a super convenient location. Or the Man From Snowy River.
     
  14. Arsas

    Arsas One of Us

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    Sundeck???
     
  15. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    I considered them - the pricing seems comparable to a few others, but it seems like they are halfway up one of the slopes - might be a challenge getting the 3yo to snow school for the first couple of days?
     
  16. chicski

    chicski A Local Ski Pass: Gold

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    Carry him/her. It’s halfway up FV, easy slide down. If you’re lucky you could go via the half pipe ;)
     
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  17. bengarden

    bengarden Addicted

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    I did warn you it's not cheap ;)
     
  18. Donzah

    Donzah Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    How much is the manor?
     
  19. Arsas

    Arsas One of Us

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    Was thinking this as well. The little kids learning area is directly below and to the side of the the half pipe which is a very short slide from Sundeck. Depending on time of season the half pipe may not even be there. If you didn't want to ski down front valley you could ski or walk the down the road. V8 is an easy way to get back to the sundeck with a 3yo.
     
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  20. Donzah

    Donzah Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    IMO a three year old girl is only going to be on a magic carpet.
    if at all. Smiggs would be crap in this regard. (i'm not sure they do full days there anyways)

    I've had a bunch of friends that have taught or tried to teach their kids. 3 is at the absolute lowest age for a snowboard lesson all day program IMO.
     
  21. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Grumblebum Ski Pass: Gold

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    The super little beginner kids' learning area is behind the Perisher Centre, and you have to check them in to child minding centre opposite the ticket windows anyway.

    The half pipe is a great way to get kids down before lifts open and the ferals arrive. Well groomed, even and smooth.

    I used to carry my daughter down Front Valley on skis, but I was a pretty confident skier. She loved it.
     
  22. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    A bit of confusion - 3yo is a boy, and he is very active generally (does circus classes etc). He'll be in the all day program, which is only offered in Front Valley. The main reason we are going to Perisher is because they offer snowboarding from 3 - the other factor is the low cost of lessons as an add-on to the lift pass, whereas at Falls when I went two years ago it was ~$400 for a 5 day lift pass, but lessons were $77 per 2 hour group less, with no discount for consecutive lessons, bundles etc.

    My wife will also have her first time on the snow. She has decided to go snowboarding too, due to a combination of peer pressure (doesn't want to be the only skier in the family) and a history of knee issues (dislocations). She has the option of having her lessons in Smiggins, but I'd be worried about the move from the carpet to a triple chairlift, or throwing her into using a t-bar/j-bar straight away.

    Can anyone comment on the adult lessons in Front Valley vs Blue Cow? I figure I may as well take some lessons, given the incidental additional cost. Blue Cow is much cheaper for when we are looking - my main concerns are that the FV lessons are "Max 6", so smaller group (more relevant for the first timer wife, I suspect) and the need to take the skitube to lessons after dropping off the toddler for his day - will we be killing ourselves to make it in time for a 9AM lesson if we drop him off at 8:30 (earliest option)?
     
  23. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    While I'm a reasonable confident snowboarder, I think I'd freak out trying to carry a squirmy toddler in snow gear with board, especially given that I will be on my own board for the first time, and I have a tendency to fall over when flat basing LOL
     
  24. Donzah

    Donzah Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Ahh OK. Sorry.
    I'll break my thoughts down.
    • Even at Boy Three years old, temper your expectations for a full day at Discovery kids. They get so so worn out. He'll get a season pass for free (just admin cost). I'd keep this option fluid. At the age of three on a snowboard they are very very raw. They basically just go down a bunny slope then heel edge/fall. (i've helped teach around ten kids of this age).
    • Some of the parents use a harness for their kids once they progress to riding lifts.
    • You won't get to BC by 9am. The drop off at discovery kids is a legit zoo.Though they have lessons at 11?
    • I think BC is the best spot to learn for your wife. Its also the best spot to take a 3/4 year old for parental lessons/play. Snow is in better knick. Less people.
    • I'd really consider the Manor. The rooms are dated. Though the meals and room combo is ideal for those with young kids. You are incredibly close to the lifts. It can be a bit noisy at night with groomers rattling and snowguns outside. Though it has a great rest area/bar for your wife for the down times .
     
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  25. Arsas

    Arsas One of Us

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    Yep you are correct. That's the thing that looks like a hills hoist that is low to the ground that the kids hold onto?
    I was thinking of the Tomb Thumb area (on the perisher map), which is next to the magic carpet but fenced off. They have another carpet and a small T bar possibly??
     
  26. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    Thanks!
    I figure as long as he is in the Discovery program if he is tuckered out he can go inside to rest, so that's not such a big deal.
    I figured lessons at 11 would be the fallback option, but if it was possible to make the 9AM run it would be easier. It depends how quickly my wife picks things up as to whether we would be able to do some green runs together before lessons after a few days.
    I've had contact back from Snowy Gums, and they are sounding like a winner. I know that it means a shuttle to and from Smiggins each day, but the cost differential is significant.
    Wife is a light sleeper, so that also means that the Manor is sounding less appealing if it is a bit noisy.
     
  27. Donzah

    Donzah Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Just beware the shuttles from snowy gum will add 30mins to your leave time.
    From the manor it's five mins walk at most to discovery "hallway"
    From smiggs. You will need to walking out at 8am.
    The shuttles can be infrequent midweek. Ie every 20/40mins
     
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  28. chicski

    chicski A Local Ski Pass: Gold

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    Snowy gums may have parking? Some lodges at Smiggs do. If so a quick drive round to Perisher carpark for lessons and skip the bus.
     
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  29. silva

    silva One of Us

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    Having had a toddler snowboarder who is now a 9 year old catch me if you can snowboarder here is a few tips (all huge generalisations of course but if one thing helps then I figure its worth 5 mins of typing):
    - Toddlers who actually want to snowboard can snowboard - they just need some listening skills and a bit of resilience. If he is used to taking instruction and waiting his turn (circus classes will help here) he will learn fast.
    - Encourage him to be on his toes at least as much as his heals. Where my son was taught they never actually teach falling leaf - straight to J turns meant no getting into the habit of slip sliding down the hill on his heels. Big win.
    - If you can do some sideways activities before you go - work out which foot is dominant. If he does not have a preference make him the opposite to you as this makes it much easier to haul him up the hill when you start doing T bars with him. Ditch the scooter and grab a skateboard and tow him around with a short rope. Teach him to point where he wants to go with his front hand. Pad him up when you do this, elbow and knee pads, wrist guards and a helmet are cool.
    - Toddlers just can not keep their little hands out of the snow and their mouths. Mittens are a winner. Have at least 3 pairs as they will get soaked no matter what you do (caught my son trying to put his mitten back on holding a snowball in his hand once, no wonder the inside of his gloves always seemed to get as wet as the outside). Despite me buying expensive gortex bells and whistles gloves my sons favourite were cheap Aldi gloves. Buy several pairs, use a marker pen to make them uniquely his and send him to snowboard school with a couple of spare sets. (Aldi thermals and socks also work well)
    - We found that it was worth investing in good onesie outerwear - onesie as it has no jacket to loose, at lunch just pull the top half off and tie around his waist. Our son had the Burton Striker one piece suit https://www.burton.com/au/en/p/boys...one-piece/W19-115761.html?regionSelector=true in several sizes and prints - warm, dry and easy. Even at 3 and 4 he could put it on himself. Last year when my son was 8 (having just grown out of the largest size of this Burton make) I would have to check every time that he had remembered to do up the powder skirt on his jacket, had everything tucked in etc and even then we had a few gear malfunctions ending up with snow in places it shouldn't be - kids practically bathe in the snow. The fewer places snow can get inside clothing the better. If hiring given the option go the onesie - even if it doesn't look cool like the Burton gear.
    - Kids snowboard boots are thinner and not as waterproof and insulated as adult boots. Even in Australia where it is not really that cold you may need a couple of sets of toe warmers just in case - you stick them to the TOP, outside of their socks. they can be a day saver. Always send a dry pair of socks to snowboard school as well - just incase he needs to change into them at lunch. Give a couple of sets of toe and hand warmers to your kids instructor. Even if its not your child they get used for they could keep your kids group out on the snow rather than headed indoors as one little munchkin got cold or wet hands or feet. Several times I have been approached by parents at the end of the day or at the next day check in trying to pay for or replace the warmers that their child had needed the day before. Pass it forward - stock the instructors pockets is my usual reply.
    - When in doubt more snacks is better. Stock his pockets, your pockets and if necessary the instructors pockets with mini chocolates, pieces of muesli bar, etc.
     
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  30. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    I actually picked up a 90cm After School Special for his birthday last week, along with a riglet reel. Pretty much each day he has asked me if we can play snowboard.

    I think this will be the biggest challenge - trying to convince him that mittens are a good idea.

    For snow clothing we have a set of phenix 0-4 adjustable bib and jacket. He has worn these when we went ice skating and did really well in them. Just have to figure out what we need around thermals etc.

    I've never actually considered or investigated warmers before, so I'll look into that, thanks!
     
  31. Genghis Khan

    Genghis Khan Hard Yards

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    I've gotten a couple of toddlers through this in the last few years and 20 years ago used to teach toddlers that weren't my own.....

    First, if the main focus of the trip is skiing just stay as close to the bottom of the lifts as you can afford. Everything else is secondary - that is what will make the biggest difference to you and your family's enjoyment of the holiday. Skiing with a toddler is not even vaguely similar to skiing on your own or with adults. Do not underestimate the level of faffing around involved or the benefit of being able to take easy breaks somewhere comfortable and convenient (and for the avoidance of doubt if you want your wife to come back you should not plan for that to be the public areas/zoo at front valley). Bear in mind even 500m from lifts is a very different holiday experience - the premium is so high because most people will find real value in the proximity- ie it's expensive but still good value......

    Second, work out if you want child care or for your son to learn to ski. At 3 group lessons are child care with a bit of snow play - a very useful service but you really need to temper your expectations on the ski side even for the most athletically gifted kid. If you want him to be skiing on the lift with you this holiday you need to go private.

    Third, it's not realistic to put your son in at one ski school base and you take lessons somewhere else. You're just creating stress for yourself that you don't need to. Stick in the same place. It sounds like you're pretty set on smigs - I would not plan for your wife or son to leave smigs- I personally think
    its perfect terrain for your group and provided you are confident enough helping son on and off lift I don't see why you'd take them to FV if you're not staying there - more crowds and steeper terrain. Blue cow would be perfect but it's a bus and a train and realistically an hour away from smigs so I wouldn't even consider it.

    Finally, unless your son has exceptional resilience, if it is snowy, or even worse windy or rainy, seriously reconsider if they should go out that day. You want him to love skiing not endure it!

    Unfortunately all of the above is expensive of course. You don't say when you're thinking of going and I'm in a club lodge so have no idea if commercial prices but I'm assuming September is cheaper than July/August. If I were you I would look for good deals in the first half of September at one of the places others have suggested at the front valley lifts. Our best family skiing in Aus has all been in September - it's the sweet spot for weather that kids enjoy being outside in.

    We've done lots of skiing with toddlers and friends are always saying "I don't know how you do it etc". The secret is convenience - you need to pay up but it is the difference between trying skiing with the family once and finding it all too hard for the next 5 years, or enjoying what I think is the best family holiday there is year after year!!

    Good luck and happy trails!
     
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  32. silva

    silva One of Us

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    Hi Nezumi
    The Burton boards are sensational little boards to learn on - my son has had just about every size. 90cm might be a touch long for him to start with but at least it will be nice and stable. The single strap burton bindings are great too (my sons had eyes no them - it was a game he never tired of, Burt was hungry and had to eat you need to make loud yum, yum, crunch, crunch sounds while doing up the ratchet as Burt the big strap ate the little half of the strap). The boots with the Velcro straps are a bit hit and miss - the straps are a bit long if they have skinny little ankles. Bunnings Velcro straps were our improvisation. The Boa kids boots are great but once again we had to do them up about as tight as they would go. For easy in and out another brand to look at is SP bindings. They are good as you set the straps and then opening and closing them does not change how tight they are when closed. They are easy to undo and do up with little hands in mitts. Its a different method than normal style bindings though - they are easier to put on on your knees rather than your butt. https://sp-bindings.com/collections/youth-18-19/products/kiddo-18-19-red
    One word of warning though - I had to get some for me as well - just so I could keep up with my son off on and off the lifts.

    Thermals = aldi. Cheap, wash well, work well and he will match just about every other kid on the hill. Add a cheap fleece (not cotton) jumper if cold. Add a cheap pair of fleece track pants if really cold. Always add a neck warmer as much to keep snow out of their jacket as warm air in (Aldi fleece ones are simple and work well) and a super thin helmet liner - we have found the Turtle Fur ones fit well and last forever - at 9 he is still wearing the liner we bought when he was 3:
    https://www.turtlefur.com/products/kids-brain-shroud
    https://www.turtlefur.com/products/kids-comfort-shell-frost-liner
    They have combo versions as well but our son never really found them comfortable - not sure why.
    https://www.turtlefur.com/products/kids-comfort-shell-shellaclava-balaclava

    I had never purchased a pair of hand or toe warmers before having a toddler at the snow. They don't actually get that hot inside your boots - they just give off enough heat so your feet don't get cold, they don't make your feet super toasty (I had to try a pair out of course). I buy them off ebay (hugely cheaper)for $1 a pair. The hand warmer version is just the same but without the sticky stuff on the back. I have actually found that the sticky stuff is good when using them for toddler hands as well - actually stick them to the inside of their mitts so that when they pull their gloves off the warmer does not go flying and you are stuck trying to retrieve it out of the snow. I stick them on the palm side so they can close their fist around them if their hands are really cold. Not really applicable in Australian conditions but on one super chilly day in the US the instructor actually stuck them to the kids thermals on their lower back. He was toasty warm. Ski patrol over there do the same - slap a few on injured people to help keep them warm before wrapping them in the silver blankets. One guy showed me he had them inbetween layers of his neck/face protection and would pull it up so it was on his nose and cheeks on the lifts as he was prone to frostbite on his face. If exposed to open atmosphere they react too fast and get too hot but they are a good thing to have stashed in your pockets - I have helped out quite a few struggling parents by gifting their miserable children little packets of warmth - can make a huge difference.
    Here is a ebay link:
    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Little-...19f3ea1ceb48aebbe8124ba136e125&frcectupt=true
     
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  33. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    Thanks for the tips!

    The main focus will be having fun and exploring for me, and learning/having a go at this whole sliding around on snow malarky for my wife.

    The little one will be going into the all-day discover program, so he will have the flexibility to learn through play etc. Given that we are going to be snowboarding, while I'd love for him to have a blast, I'm not anticipating that he will have the strength or endurance to do too much independently with us.

    The only downside of the discover program is that it isn't offered in Smiggins - only FV. The other issue is that there is only one chair and the rest in Smiggins are t-bars/j-bars. Not so great for a little snowboarder (or a grown up, first time snowboarder).

    I'll give some thought to one of the FV accommodation options - maybe Swagman's or Matterhorn. The difficulty for me is not knowing the location, and so having to rely on estimates of time for the transit between accommodation and the ski school.

    I might end up biting the bullet in terms of lessons and book us in at FV. My wife is not a person who enjoys crowds, so I though BC might be easier in that regard - but on the flip side, it could be rather dull having to kill 2 hours between dropping the toddler off and starting our lessons if we opt for the 11AM start time.

    Here's a video of him on the evening that he got the snowboard. He opened it that morning, I showed him how to strap in, and then he went of to childcare all day. Came home and I put the riglet reel on and he had a go being towed around: video

    As you can see on the video, he's a long thin streak of nothing - he meets the minimum weight for the After School Special 80cm and 90cm - just. Given that this year it will be mostly play rather than full on learning, I figured that sizing up one wouldn't be an issue. It also meant that I could go for the zoo graphic, which I figured he would like over the current blue. I also bought the board with the expectation that this year we would play on it and he would need to be enrolled in snow school as a skier - then I discovered that Perisher allow snowboarding for tiny ones.

    I'm holding off on buying boots. He's a kids size 8 shoe right now, but I would hate to buy a boot that fits now and doesn't fit come holiday time.

    Fortunately, I just got a pair of Step Ons for my board, so speed won't be an issue there :D
     
  34. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Grumblebum Ski Pass: Gold

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    With 3 year old (and a beginner wife) once you are more than a couple of hundred metres from the lifts extra distance will become irrelevant. You will be using oversnow transport. Most commercial lodges will have free morning and afternoon shuttles. Mostly they run at fixed times but will have at least one run that will get you to lessons on time. Outside those times there is also a service called Hans Oversnow that offers on demand trips or trips booked in advance (like a taxi) subject to congestion and demand. They are usually pretty good except on changeover days.
     
  35. Ted Harper

    Ted Harper One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    The above posts have a lot of excellent and well-written information for the OP; thanks very much for taking the trouble guys!

    What little value I can offer on the subject is below (context: My kids are grown up to adults now, but they all learnt from 3-4 years old with the ski school in Perisher and all came skiing with us from a few months old):

    * We have a lodge in Smiggins. Staying on the hill is a massive advantage with kids, far outweighing (IMHO) any cost differential to staying in Jindabyne. Thank me the first time you _don't_ have to get a cold wet child into a car and crawl down the hill in a blizzard, but instead watch it unfold out your lodge window with a cleansing beverage in hand ;)

    * Biggest single advantage in a lot of the Smiggins lodges (vs Perisher) is having parking in front of the lodge or at least close by - the amount of stuff you need with small kids is unbelievable, and if you do want to take them for a drive somewhere you can. Quite a few lodges in Smiggins have parking - either at the lodge itself or in a shared carpark down near the turnoff from the Perisher road. In Perisher the only lodge with parking is The Man from Snowy River; FYI I've never stayed there but I have only heard good things about it and the lady who handles their bookings is a friend of our lodge managers and she is a nice and helpful lady and well worth a phone call.

    * Junior Ski Kids (or whatever it is called now) is only in Front Valley. If you are staying in Smiggins, as long as you are on the shuttle bus by about 8:15 you have no trouble getting there for drop-off time. The buses run very frequently from a bit before 8am, the drivers are helpful and understanding of parents with kids, and at that time of day it is mainly only other parents with kids and (an astonishing number of) tobogganers and snow-players, so you can always get onto the first bus that comes. The last couple of seasons I have been helping one of my skiing friends' daughters with getting her kids to variously the creche and junior ski school (via the shuttle bus), and it's (still) fine - it's a very long time since I needed to do it with my own kids. The bus picks up at the shelter shed in front of Smiggins Hotel and drops off at the turning circle outside Aldo's restaurant at the Skitube Terminal (again there is a shelter shed there). Same locations for the ride back down in the afternoon.

    * The Smiggins Hotel (again I haven't stayed there but it is consistently highly regarded and gets a lot of year-after-year repeat business - has its own car park too) has a Kids' Club, I think for kids a little older than yours, but as with The Man in Perisher giving them a call might be helpful.

    Obligatory plug for another lodge you may consider: http://thecoachmanskilodge.com.au
     
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  36. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    Thanks for the detail, *especially* about the shuttle. Knowing where the drop off and pick up locations are is immensely helpful.

    On the recommendation of a few others above, and a friend who has stayed there, we're going to try Snowy Gums this year. $2,250 for 5 nights for all 3 of us in the first week of August, so I'm very happy with that. I don't see any issues with being up and about early enough to get on the first shuttle, have a bit of a snow play, straight in to the kid's snow school and then lessons for mum and dad.

    Bring on the snow!
     
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  37. Ted Harper

    Ted Harper One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    Excellent, glad you are staying on the hill! Snowy Gums is good - nice location too. They have some parking spots outside the lodge (their access road is the back one - you drive up to the far end of the Smiggins carpark then turn right and drive back down behind the front row of lodges) and some down in the shared overnight carpark at the Smiggins turnoff; not sure if you have to book/nominate which area you want to park in, and whether you need to specify you need a parking spot at all or pay extra for it and lock it in when you book to be sure you get a spot.

    Finally I don't remember if you said you all have gear, but anything you need to hire, Rhythm's store in Smiggins (they took over Snowline a couple of years ago) is directly in front of Snowy Gums - you will literally walk past it going to and from the shuttle bus every day from Snowy Gums. They are nice people and have a good range of gear. Also in previous years they have given a discount for booking before the start of the season too - I haven't heard for this year (they were doing maintenance work on the building when I went past yesterday but I didn't drop in to ask).
     
  38. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    Us boys are pretty sorted for gear - well, he needs boots and mittens and we both need helmets, but otherwise OK.

    His mum, on the other hand, is quite keen to go shopping for a beginner board before trying snowboarding - I think she feels a little left out :D

    The booking email for Snowy Gums mentioned an offer for 20% off hire at Rhythm Snowline, so that's always an option.
     
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  39. silva

    silva One of Us

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    So so cute.
    Put his ugg boots on and then teach him to do up his bindings sitting on his butt then show him how to stand up and how to roll over and stand up on his toe edge.
    The Burton boots actually have a grow feature - we got 2 seasons out of some. So if you buy a size 9 you can then pull out the innersoles and they become a size 10.
    If you can convince him that white and purple is an acceptable colour scheme Rhythm have these on sale at the moment:
    https://www.rhythmsnowsports.com.au/burton-mini-grom-snowboard-boot-kids-98308.html
    or if he has a growth spurt the BOA version is infinitely better:
    https://www.rhythmsnowsports.com.au/burton-grom-boa-snowboard-boots-kids-61586.html
    Pink and Aqua is cool for boys - at 40% off I am sure that is correct.
    If you do decide to purchase check sizes carefully - Don't forget they are US sizes which are one up from most Aussie shoes which are often UK sizes. Mondo is more reliable as it is cms. Check out the Burton sizing chart online.
    Your other option is to rent boots for growing little feet. This is easy - I recommend Rhythm which have a store at smiggins. I have always bought on sale and then sold used for minimal outlay.
    Your wife will most likely benefit from a beginner specific board for the first couple of days then need something a bit more lower intermediate focused (The Burton LTR boards from the last couple of years are really quite amazing - I wish they had been around when I learnt - they actually make it quite hard to catch an edge and experience that super hard, fast slap into the snow. They are only great for the first week or so though - then you will be looking for more turn initiation and edges). If she if feeling the need to purchase equipment then I would say take her boot shopping - womens specific snowboard boots are SOOOO much more comfortable than hire boy boots. Then buy a board after trying a few out to see what she likes for example lots of my female friends love rocker boards but I hate them - give me a good stiff camber board any day. Hiring will let her try out a couple of different styles to see what she prefers rather than being stuck on a beginner board.
     
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  40. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    You're talking about a boy who loves his butterfly and rainbow trackpants just as much as his light up dinosaur gumboots, so white and purple boots probably won't be an issue.

    Holy carp, they make boa Groms down to an 11C? That I did not know!

    I'm trying to convince her that we need to go to a shop and get her a proper boot fit - I'm not fussed if the shop wants to do a "if you don't buy our boots you have to pay for the bootfit" thing if it means that she receives proper advice on the sizing.

    I've recently bought myself a board for the first time - always hired previously - and I went for a camber dominant board, but only because I learnt how to board in the early 2000's, before rocker really gained prominence.
     
  41. silva

    silva One of Us

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    I keep a bit of an eye on the discounts at Rhythm and ESS and snap things up for future use. They grow so fast. Both the above boots are a good buy and both have the growfit inner soles - excellent feature. The Boa Groms are fantastic little boots - much easier for the kids to do up themselves. They do not tend to be able to pull the Velcro ones tight enough.
    ESS has the boys colour of the Velcro version on sale as well https://shop.essboardstore.com.au/burton-mini-grom-18.html. Cheaper than hiring for 5 days.

    I have typical high arch, wide feet - boot fit is critical for me or I end up hobbling around and not having fun. Most shops are pretty good about letting you try several brands of boots on. I also need to strap into bindings with them on to see if they press down on the top bony bit of my foot. While boot fit is probably not as critical for snowboarders as it is for skiers it is still important.
     
  42. silva

    silva One of Us

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    Thought you might be interested
     

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  43. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    Thanks Silva! I think I had seen these ones pop up (although I am getting so frustrated with Facebook's marketplace notifications), but I have measured his feet at 16cms already, so I am anticipating needing either 9c or 10c boots. I might also see if he can fill out an 11c boot, so that he can have boa boots like daddy.
     
  44. silva

    silva One of Us

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    I would grab a pair of the 11c boa boots - sooo much better - if you can get a pair at a reasonable price - I found they do run small. With kids I have also found that they are not used to shoes actually fitting. They are used to the thumb width allowance and will tell you their shoes are too small and hurting when they fit as a adults snowboard boots fit (toes touching until you bend your knees). For little kids comfort is more important than exact fit. They will be running around in their boots as much as riding in them.
     
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  45. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    Managed to snag a pair of Grom Boas today for $125 as New Old Stock - 2017 model, but perfectly functional. :D We tried the 10C Mini-Grom boots, but had a lot of difficulty trying to secure the lower/front velcro strap.

    Mr 3.5 has had a test slide wearing them and strapped into his After School Special - seemed pretty happy in them, so that's a plus (and his feet will only get bigger from here. LOL).
     
  46. silva

    silva One of Us

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    Sounds like a win all around. The Grom Boas are great and I have never had comfort complaints. Just buy a couple of pairs of toe warmers to stick ON TOP of his toes if he complains of cold feet. We have never had a problem in Aus but did in the US a few times. Little boots just don't have as much insulation and adult ones.