Clarification of quoted snow chain 'terminology' from recent posts.




"stretch" - the chain mesh of quality diamond pattern snow chains does not stretch. Snow chain links wear from use where they join the next link, just like a metal watch band or a necklace does over time. This is why a snow chain gets larger or "grows" in size over time. The adjustment component, or tensioner, is provided to compensate for this on the snow chain

"Tyre circumference"- will always vary slightly between different makes and models of tyres in a given tyre size. The adjustment component, or tensioner, is provided to compensate for this on the snow chain.

"Tire-Size-Calculator"- is provided to calculate alternative tyre sizes as replacement for the original tyre fitment size.
The 'TSC' can only provide partial information in relation to snow chain size fitment.
Correct snow chain fitment relates to four dimensions.
A) Diameter or circumference of the tyre.
B) Width of the tyre tread.
C) The form of the shoulder of the tyre. The rounder the shoulder, the lower the volume of the tyre. On very square shoulder off-road 4WD tyres, because of the greater the volume of the tyre, a larger the chain may be required.
D) Wheel rim width. The wider the wheel rim width that a given tyre size is fitted to the greater the volume of the tyre and a larger the chain size may have to be used to ensure the correct fit

"fit depending on tyre wear" - again the adjustment component, or tensioner of the snow chain, is provided to compensate for tyre wear.
For example, for a 215/60R16 tyre, fitted to a Ford Falcon, the difference in diameter between a new tyre and worn out tyre is only about 3% (from approx. 688mm down to 670mm)

"a sheet of plastic you can lie on" would only ever be required to fit a ladder pattern snow chain. No sign of having to "lie down on a sheet of plastic" for fitting a Konig, Thule or a Rud diamond pattern snow chain, or even a spider chain, in their fitting videos.
 

Rover

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snowtyres said:
"a sheet of plastic you can lie on" would only ever be required to fit a ladder pattern snow chain. No sign of having to "lie down on a sheet of plastic" for fitting a Konig, Thule or a Rud diamond pattern snow chain, or even a spider chain, in their fitting videos.

I disagree with this......a prepared person should always take a sheet of plastic or similar ......for kneeling on, or having to clear snow from behind the wheel, or inside the wheel arch...
those videos only ever show how to fit in ideal condtions.
 
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Hully

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snowtyres said:
"stretch" - the chain mesh of quality diamond pattern snow chains does not stretch. Snow chain links wear from use where they join the next link, just like a metal watch band or a necklace does over time. This is why a snow chain gets larger or "grows" in size over time. The adjustment component, or tensioner, is provided to compensate for this on the snow chain

"Tyre circumference"- will always vary slightly between different makes and models of tyres in a given tyre size. The adjustment component, or tensioner, is provided to compensate for this on the snow chain.

"Tire-Size-Calculator"- is provided to calculate alternative tyre sizes as replacement for the original tyre fitment size.
The 'TSC' can only provide partial information in relation to snow chain size fitment.
Correct snow chain fitment relates to four dimensions.
A) Diameter or circumference of the tyre.
B) Width of the tyre tread.
C) The form of the shoulder of the tyre. The rounder the shoulder, the lower the volume of the tyre. On very square shoulder off-road 4WD tyres, because of the greater the volume of the tyre, a larger the chain may be required.
D) Wheel rim width. The wider the wheel rim width that a given tyre size is fitted to the greater the volume of the tyre and a larger the chain size may have to be used to ensure the correct fit

"fit depending on tyre wear" - again the adjustment component, or tensioner of the snow chain, is provided to compensate for tyre wear.
For example, for a 215/60R16 tyre, fitted to a Ford Falcon, the difference in diameter between a new tyre and worn out tyre is only about 3% (from approx. 688mm down to 670mm)

"a sheet of plastic you can lie on" would only ever be required to fit a ladder pattern snow chain. No sign of having to "lie down on a sheet of plastic" for fitting a Konig, Thule or a Rud diamond pattern snow chain, or even a spider chain, in their fitting videos.

Funniest chain post of the season!!!
laugh.gif
laugh.gif
 
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Hully

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Charlie said:
Hully said:
Funniest chain post of the season!!!
laugh.gif
laugh.gif

Now, that's a big call!

Yeah probably, but I think that many of the others have been ridiculous as opposed to straight up funny. You don't need a plastic sheet because the videos showing how to fit the chains are made in a studio
smile.gif
 
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Rover

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Hully said:
Charlie said:
Hully said:
Funniest chain post of the season!!!
laugh.gif
laugh.gif

Now, that's a big call!

Yeah probably, but I think that many of the others have been ridiculous as opposed to straight up funny. You don't need a plastic sheet because the videos showing how to fit the chains are made in a studio
smile.gif

maybe snowtyres has never fitted chains in a real world situation?
 
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Hully

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Rover said:
Hully said:
Charlie said:
Hully said:
Funniest chain post of the season!!!
laugh.gif
laugh.gif

Now, that's a big call!

Yeah probably, but I think that many of the others have been ridiculous as opposed to straight up funny. You don't need a plastic sheet because the videos showing how to fit the chains are made in a studio
smile.gif

maybe snowtyres has never fitted chains in a real world situation?

Yeah, this is becoming my real concern...fitted or used them in a real world situation. I see people turn up after dark during a storm, carrying snow chains but not prepared at all to fit them. Wearing shorts and town clothes and nothing in the way of appropriate gloves, ground sheet etc!
 
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Rover

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even though I have had the same style chains for many years, I always pull them out in early June each year, inspect them, wipe off the excess wd40 and trial fit them to the car for practice...makes it so much easier when the time comes to fit them for real.
at the end of each season, if I have used them, they get pulled out, inspected, wiped or washed down, dried then given a quick spray with wd40, a quick wipe and put away for the summer.

The chains I currently have will be 7 years old this year, and will be the last year I use them....they are starting to show signs of wear.

Its jus so easy to look after them....a Saturday morning in early June when I am getting the ski's out and scraping back the summer coat of wax, then a Saturday in October to to the reverse with the chains and ski's.
 

dawooduck

relaxed and comfortable
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With the exception of the last paragraph about "sheets to lie on" the rest is factual. That said, kneeling on the road on a pair of gloves or nothing at all usually does the trick so I guess it really boils down how you treat your ski pants. I have a "dog rug" in the back that does the trick for chain fitting or random sitting in the dirt use.

The whole "fitting chains" 101 should always be viewed from a "bugger, now we have to put these blardy things on" point of view and all chains are a dirty impost to fit. Some worse than others.

Being a NSW skier, in 30 something years I have fitted chains about 10 times in my life so I don't claim to have a "pit stop routine", just your average "shit bugger bum, here we go" approach but I do own the right size chains.

I don't tend to apply what an experienced chain fitter does to what the occasional snow goer will do when required to fit chains. That would be a tad presumptuous of me. Fitting chains for someone who has never done it will always be a crappy task and for the vast majority of people its a "hire and hope" scenario.
 
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Snow Addict

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What Dr Duck said, particularly about being no 'pit stop routine'.

I've had to fit the chains I own so few times that if I have time, I try to do a driveway fit before the first trip of the season.

Just to remind myself HTF they go on - so if/when I'm doing it for real, it's not accompanied by too much faffing and swearing.
 

sixty_eight

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Now it has switched to GIO Insurance. Is that suggesting I may need to give them a call if I don't fit my chains correctly?
 

Garvs

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Good thread, reminded me to put a ground sheet in, gloves are permanently in with the chains. Heading up to Dinner Plain for our first extended stay (10 days) of the season this weeekend. Did a "refresher" chain fit in the drive a couple of weeks ago. I've only had to fit them once in the last 5 years, can never remember whether I should be feeding the yellow end from behind the wheel or the front
wink.gif
.
 
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Hully

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Garvs said:
Good thread, reminded me to put a ground sheet in, gloves are permanently in with the chains. Heading up to Dinner Plain for our first extended stay (10 days) of the season this weeekend. Did a "refresher" chain fit in the drive a couple of weeks ago. I've only had to fit them once in the last 5 years, can never remember whether I should be feeding the yellow end from behind the wheel or the front
wink.gif
.

Gobbldygook from the "arm chair'/my shop expert and then good advice from people who actually travel to the snow and think about fitting chains.
 
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Angus_McCrory

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Similar to DWD have fitted chains about half a dozen times in over 30 years and not since I got a 4wd (though I carry them as I wouldn't want miss an epic day). And saw a few expert chain fitters on the I 80 near Colfax. Can't remember what they charged as we fitted our own chains.
 

telemark fred

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Like others have said, I've carried chains for 22 seasons, and only fitted about 10 times. Have fitted twice in 12 years since having 4WD/AWD vehicles.

I always do a trial fit in the driveway before heading off for the first trip each season to confirm that the chains are still ok, and that I remember how its done when not freezing etc.

Do pack gloves and either wear waterproof pants or have something to kneel on while fitting the chains. It's inevitably in the slush zone and frozen fingers are no fun. Usually a bit muddy too.

Time to buy new chains or me on the way down to Perisher next week. Last set fitted my last 3 vehicles with tyres on all 3 all being within the adjustment range of the chains. Got a different vehicle recently, and the chains aren't even close to fitting
frown.gif
(tried this afternoon).
 
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