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Advice needed Home waxing (skis that is)

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by southpaw, Jul 3, 2019.

  1. southpaw

    southpaw One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Hi all
    A search of the forums shows a lot of people seem to home wax. I thought it would be great to be able to do all the family skis at home but not sure if it’s hard to do or not. A couple of questions: do I need a special waxing iron or can I use a decommissioned regular iron? Also what wax for general purpose OZ conditions and from where? Finally this one off permanent solution which I see Rythym for example sells at 150, is that the price for one application or can I do more than one set of skis? Lots of questions I know but any advice greatly appreciated.
     
  2. iagreewithhim

    iagreewithhim One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Based on my experience, any old iron will do.
     
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  3. Donzah

    Donzah Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    This.
    If you're doing a couple of sets.. Easy.
     
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  4. Ziggy

    Ziggy A Local Ski Pass: Gold

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    Try and score an old heavy job - without steam holes is an advantage.

    A dedicated iron is easier to use and less likely to overheat the base.
     
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  5. Jarryboy

    Jarryboy Hard Yards

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    If u can iron clothes poorly, you’re qualified
     
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  6. teckel

    teckel Pool Room Ski Pass: Gold

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    Oh dear!
    [​IMG]
     
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  7. MarkV

    MarkV One of Us

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    I use an Op-shop Iron. Works fine and cost me two dollars.
     
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  8. Marty_McSly

    Marty_McSly What a plonker. Ski Pass: Gold

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    That'll be DPS Phantom. Discussion here: https://www.ski.com.au/xf/threads/dps-phantom.79757/

    And yes, that'll be the price for a single application.
     
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  9. MarzNC

    MarzNC One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    DPS Phantom is not a wax, but for people who intend to keep a pair of skis for at least 3 seasons, it can be a good option for a recreational skier. It's also possible to apply Phantom at home. No experience waxing required.

    I've treated three pairs of skis so far. Since the skis in my house are 160cm or shorter and less than 85 wide underfoot, I could treat more than two skis with one Phantom 2.0 kit. That was based on my experience treating the first pair of skis with Phantom 1.0 in Jan 2018. Where I live is warm enough and has enough sun to treat at home with Phantom during the middle of winter.

    How many pairs of skis are in the family? How many ski days per season? Mostly in Australia? Are the kids still growing?

    I got basic tools for waxing my skis and my daughter's a while back when we stopped renting skis. Started with a cheap iron that was only intended for waxing skis. When we started skiing more days, I invested in a basic iron designed for waxing skis. It was worth the money. What I never bothered to buy were vises. I only waxed skis, I didn't tune (sharpen) edges at home.
     
    #9 MarzNC, Jul 4, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2019
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  10. teleroo

    teleroo One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Me too, one without the holes. Use on low heat. As to wax, really for most of us a "general purpose" not too expensive one will do I reckon. Wax seem to be exorbitantly priced, not sure if there is a reason or just expensive because "skiing".
     
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  11. southpaw

    southpaw One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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  12. cornice11

    cornice11 One of Us

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    Get a waxing iron. Old school irons which hold a constant heat are hard to come by these days.

    wax is expensive but datawax about $10 per stick from uk ebay is a reasonably priced option.
     
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  13. southpaw

    southpaw One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Thanks
    Thanks this is really helpful. We’re proposing to ski a lot more this season and also the northern hemisphere season as well so I thought it was worth home waxing. However given all that I’ve read it may pay to do the permanent treatment.
     
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  14. southpaw

    southpaw One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Thanks for the tip.
     
  15. currawong

    currawong Old but not so Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    the main difference between a waxing iron and a domestic iron is the temperature control. waxing irons should keep the temperature more constant. if the temperature varies too much you increase the chance of delaminating the ski. i did that once to an old xc ski.
    if you use an old iron, keep it on the lowest setting that will do the job. after dripping wax onto the ski, do one long, rather slow, pass with the iron.
    but waxing is easy and nothing to be scared of. keep an eye out for inexpensive wax. in Aus you will normally need a warm temp wax or a universal wax. having a cold or intermediate wax on hand can be good for those cold july falls.
    keep your eyes open for an inexpensive waxing iron that you can later buy with what you save on getting your skis waxed
     
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  16. linked_recoveries

    linked_recoveries One of Us

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    If you're going to wax then you'll also need to scrape and brush that wax off your skis. While you're ordering wax go ahead and order a scraper and a good base brush. They come in varying materials, designed to be more or less stiff.
     
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  17. D-eye

    D-eye Photographer and skier Moderator

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    check to see if your local ski shop runs a waxing info night. If you are near Canberra Straight line usually does once or twice a season.
     
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  18. southpaw

    southpaw One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Damn just had a look on their Facebook page they held a free tuning seminar last night! Hopefully they will do it again.
     
  19. D-eye

    D-eye Photographer and skier Moderator

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    Ha, timing. I just looked, they mention that they will be doing others.
     
  20. Sage Oya

    Sage Oya Like the herb, lover of Pabst, cup ramen devotee Ski Pass: Gold

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    Definitely worth picking up a proper iron as they are quite inexpensive. Universal wax works well here and is pretty cheap. Ask the ski shop if you can buy some of the stuff they buy in bulk to do their skis. Grab a scraper, scraper sharpener, brush and gummi stone and you’re set. Should be able to buy all these items for about the cost of a day pass this year:p
     
  21. southpaw

    southpaw One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Is a gummy stone needed for waxing? If so what’s it for?
     
  22. Sage Oya

    Sage Oya Like the herb, lover of Pabst, cup ramen devotee Ski Pass: Gold

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    Useful for taking off surface rust on your edges and to smooth out small burrs. Not essential for waxing.

    *edit worth grabbing some drop sheets from bunnings and having an old apron on hand too.
     
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  23. pegasusSki

    pegasusSki Hard Yards

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    Incidentally my skis are slightly 'white' on the base - with the design pattern in the laminate slighty faded - does this mean they are far-gone, or does a really good deep wax invariably sort?
     
  24. teleroo

    teleroo One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    I got a brass ski waxing brush from Ansco. Works for both scraping old wax off an regrooving the new stuff. So my kit is iron, brass brush, wax block, surf board wax scraper which I use for scraping softish wax back after application prior to brushing (but you can buy the Perspex scrapers).

    Also got a diamond edge file, gummy stone and one of those wheely edge tuners (but tend not to use too much).

    So process is
    1. Sort the edges with diamond stone and gummy stone
    2. Use brass brush to remove/loosen old wax, just brushing up and down ski. I guess I could use a liquid wax remover but don't have any.
    3. Drip a line of new wax onto ski
    4. Iron it in until it happily melts across full width off ski, usually 30-40 cm lengths at a time. You'll see wax behaviour change once some warmth has built up into the base and it will kind of soak in.
    5. let cool a little
    6. scrape off wax bulges before it hardens (still a little warm though)
    7. Let cool a little more (back to ambient) then regroove with the brass brush.
    8. ski
     
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  25. Hermannator

    Hermannator One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Skip step 1. Edge tuning a whole different ball game. If one doesn't know what they're doing they'll only blunt the edges instead of sharpening.

    But, use the square notch in corner of plastic scraper to scrape wax off edges.
     
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  26. Any

    Any One of Us

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    i was using a normal iron.
    i was actually cleaning it and ironing my shirts also :)
    but i found a proper wax iron online for about $50. swapping to it made my waxing significantly better.

    the biggest improvement was learning to brush after.
    i thought i wanted to keep some wax on my skis, but no, you wanna brush the shit out of it (not with brass tho, nylon)
     
  27. Donzah

    Donzah Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    De solv it from Bunnings.
    Great wax cleaner
     
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  28. Any

    Any One of Us

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    do they feel really furry?
    if not, then probably ok.

    i bought a pair of new but the previous season's stock that had apparently been stored poorly and had seemed to be very dried out. slightly white base, with an ever so slightly furry feel to it. i was pretty cranky about it.
    asked around for advice, and just in case I even took them to rhythm prepared to get a base grind and a full refit to get them up to scratch, but they said it wasn't necessary.
    i did two really generous waxes a couple of days apart, and they seem fine now.
     
  29. DPS Driver

    DPS Driver One of Us

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    The one off solution is a base treatment called Phantom from DPS. $150 is for one pair of skis. The treatment lasts for the life of the ski. Gives the same glide as a general purpose wax. Not a lot to pay when you average out the cost of waxing a pair of skis for the life of the ski.
     
  30. DPS Driver

    DPS Driver One of Us

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    I've got a shit load of skis I need to prep every year. I've got all the tools for waxing and tuning skis as I look after my own fleet. Phantom is great because I don't have to worry about waxing throughout the season. It's saved me a lot of time and the skis just keep running.
     
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  31. MarkGC

    MarkGC One of Youse Ski Pass: Gold

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  32. southpaw

    southpaw One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    [
    Got to say that’s a very appealing proposition at least for me and Mrs ‘Paw, probably not worth it for the Rugrats.
     
  33. southpaw

    southpaw One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Thanks, I assumed you couldn’t buy an iron from OS because of different voltage: is that right? I’m electrically challenged so I don’t understand when it’s ok to plug in an OS sourced electrical product or not noting of course you need an adapter for the different pin config.
     
  34. MarkGC

    MarkGC One of Youse Ski Pass: Gold

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    I bought my iron from Tognar, at the time they stocked a version for Aussie voltage and sockets. That was a few years ago, not sure what they currently stock.
     
  35. Neddy

    Neddy Hard Yards

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    I learnt by sitting in while the shop did it for me the first time - it can’t hurt to ask.

    Old iron and a hydrocarbon base wax have worked for me.

    Surprised that no one has yet mentioned the importance of beer in the home waxing process.

    And avoid waxing outside on apartment balconies on a windy day - the downstairs neighbours don’t always appreciate it ‘snowing’.
     
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  36. southpaw

    southpaw One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Just checked they still do Aus versions - thanks for the tip!
     
  37. southpaw

    southpaw One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    I service my own road bike - the beer is the best part of home maintenance
     
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  38. teckel

    teckel Pool Room Ski Pass: Gold

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    Yes, you can. Just use a travel adaptor.
     
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  39. Peagreenboat

    Peagreenboat Addicted

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    I imported one from the UK (Swix), it has close enough the same voltage. There are a few threads that say you can get away with other voltages (US etc) but you're likely to kill them sooner, Teckel would know his stuff. I watched some videos and was pretty happy with the results. Some swear by using a usual iron, but I was happy to spend the $80 and have something smaller to pack away and I was more confident on not overcooking the skis.
     
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  40. brett gordon

    brett gordon Hard Yards Ski Pass: Gold

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    Good source of tuning and waxing gear. instead of a final brush think about using a green/blue dishwashing scourer to finish off. also generally take some wax when skiing and a cork block. quick and dirty wax. rub wax on base then work over with the cork block.
     
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  41. teckel

    teckel Pool Room Ski Pass: Gold

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    I bought a new one for the shop this winter. Swix. Came direct from the Swix importer to Australia. Came fitted with a travel plug. ;)
     
  42. Donzah

    Donzah Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    I'd like a rotor brush
     
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  43. teckel

    teckel Pool Room Ski Pass: Gold

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    They are pretty cool. Love mine :)
     
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  44. Ziggy

    Ziggy A Local Ski Pass: Gold

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    A ski iron is likely to have a slightly concave base. Cp a clothes iron that makes it a lot easier to control the amount of wax that goes on so there's less work in scraping.
    The base will be heavier and the heat control better, as Currawong mentioned. So the heating cycle is more even and you're less like to breathe in fumes - which you really don't want to do.
     
  45. teleroo

    teleroo One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    But but but the smell of that first post-summer wax gets me really excited. It's a bit like autumn colours, a sign that summer has finally buggered off.
     
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  46. southpaw

    southpaw One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    So how often would you wax?
     
  47. teleroo

    teleroo One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Before each trip. Then maybe every 3 or 5 days, which sort of depends on abrasiveness of snow and snow moisture.

    Spring snow with big hard crystals that get wet in the arvo are quite rough on your base I reckon.

    Then a big fat coating (you don't scrape off) for summer storage.
     
  48. southpaw

    southpaw One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Thanks- very different to what I’m used to ie take them to the LSS at the beginning of season for a once a season tune.
     
  49. Budgiesmuggler

    Budgiesmuggler A Local Ski Pass: Gold

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    I use an old clothes iron too, I’m not racing the World Cup so I’m. It too bothered.

    I tend to buy wax on my NH ski trips as it’s a lot cheaper.

    I wax before I go and then every few days. Once you start you’ll really notice the difference and want to do it more regularly

    When I travel I take wax and scraper, most ski hotels have a waxing iron tucked away somewhere.

    Then edges and tuning I wait until I’m at the snow, ask around who does the best job preferably by hand and not through a machine.
     
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  50. teleroo

    teleroo One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    You'll see your bases go through a cycle:
    1. Freshly waxed - should be a little residual wax you can easily scrape off with a fingernail.
    2. Initial skiing will polish the ski bases up to a sort of shine and remove pretty much most wax you can scrape off with a fingernail. You might start to see the micro grooves in your ski base if you ski has them. All good, keep skiing.
    3. More skiing, bases will start to dull up (less visual shine). Time to start thinking about waxing soon.
    4. More skiing and bases will get a bit rough to the touch and definitely lose their shine. Definitately need waxing.
    5. More skiing and bases get visibly fluffy. Eeek - bases need serious tlc. Probably need to scrape back the bases with one of those metal scraper things to remove the loose plastic fluff. Then give a good waxing. Try not to get to this point.
    6. Big fat wax for summer storage. Scrape/melt this stuff off before your first proper pre-season wax in May or so.
     
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