Question Home weather stations

Discussion in 'Weather' started by sbm_, Jan 14, 2018.

  1. sbm_

    sbm_ Hard Yards

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    I'm thinking of getting one. I'd like to measure temperature, pressure and dew point or humidity (I figure rainfall and wind are probably more easily just looked up on the BOM, though I guess a simple rain guage wouldn't really be much hassle).

    I've seen some beautiful analog ones on people's walls...that are never working and almost always for show! What do people here have?
     
  2. POW_hungry

    POW_hungry Part of the Furniture
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    There's been plenty of discussion and threads over the years. Have you searched?
    Last year there was this discussion.

    Sadly I can't have one due to being in an apartment block (Sydney's Eastern Burbs are no good for collating genuine data unless you live by a reserve/access to roof or wide open yard) but I'd be concentrating on the Davis brand models if you can afford it (upwards of $1k). They're trusted for Aus conditions and have good tech support etc. It will come down to how much you're looking to fork out.

    Otherwise, BloomSky & AccuRite are cheaper alternatives... But can't speak on recommendations, I am afraid.
     
    #2 POW_hungry, Jan 15, 2018
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2018
  3. sbm_

    sbm_ Hard Yards

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    Ah, I'll admit I didn't search. Don't know why I'm usually pretty good with that. Disregard this thread.
     
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  4. nfip

    nfip Part of the Furniture
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    Mrs nfip grabbed this for me today at Costco.
    $130 ish
    Compatible with Wunderground.
    Shall see how it goes !
     

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  5. teckel

    teckel Old n' Crusty
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  6. Kelpieboy

    Kelpieboy One of Us

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    Really its all about how much information you want/need. I have a Vantage system with considerable extras added on including in ground probes and remote above ground sensors for a total installed cost of a tick over $3k. Due to the nature of my business and location I need the extras such as the in ground probes which show depth of rainfall penetration , sub terrain water flow and temp as well as soil temps , all of which the regular householder doesn't need. I also get good information about temps at different locations upon my property which can be quite interesting at times.
    All in all the Vantage products do a good job and are very accurate , well that is what I have found. Rain gauges and wind direction meters are all pretty much of a muchness , same with barometers and wet bulbs , some will favour one brand over another for no better reason than that is the brand they trust and therefore always use. The Acu-rite systems like the one shown by nfip are really all the sophistication that a regular householder would need.
     
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  7. Jacko4650

    Jacko4650 One of Us

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    The Tech is changing. Everyday life in a cyclone / flood area means that large-scale lows are everything. Beyond that, rainfall and river heights are daily or hourly dependent upon prevailing conditions. BOM is getting better each year but they do mental stuff like holding back data such as River Heights if data exceeds normal outliers (it should be a crime!). In other words, just when the raw data is mega-critical (eg: river has risen by 0.95m in one hour, indicating a massive wall of water coming downstream) they prefer to delay data until it is "verified", in our case 6 hours later and the cause of $millions in damage. Delays are not acceptable any more, so barometric pressure, temperature, river heights and rainfall are important, so too the previous weather to establish the current absorption rate of the soil, the capacity of local dams and condition of roads, evacuation pathways etc. Flood predictability and forecasting should be a science not an art often managed by a politician or bureaucrat that has no bloody idea or experience, let alone a hit to the bottom line.
     
  8. Ramenman

    Ramenman One of Us

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    Is it difficult to measure the humidity level accurately?.

    I mean, my family own a farm and we have 3 weather stations there. The 3 weather stations often show very different humidity levelLOL. When weather station A says the humidity is 60%, weather station B says 40%, and it often happens:confused:
     
  9. Jacko4650

    Jacko4650 One of Us

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    Serious question: Why the need to know humidity as it appears to be very difficult to measure accurately anyway? It is either humid or very humid here once it gets over 30 degrees C and other than qualifying "stickyness", I'm not sure why it is important for agriculture?
     
  10. Ramenman

    Ramenman One of Us

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    Not important. I'm just curious why all weather stations show almost the same temperature but very different humidity.
     
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  11. Kelpieboy

    Kelpieboy One of Us

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    Humidity or more correctly relative humidity is mostly unimportant in grazing or agriculture unless certain weed, pest control sprays are being deployed , some work better in drier air but don't ask me why that is so. Even then it would need to be a high humidity day , over about 70% , before it has any real effect on those sprays. I have always thought humidity was reported on tv weather more for a comfort level factor. Also I know humidity has an effect on fire and that may also be a reason.
    What I do know is I am far more comfortable in 45c with virtually 0 humidity than I am in 35c with high humidity which is one reason why I very rarely visit QLD.
     
  12. Ramenman

    Ramenman One of Us

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    We produce more than 30 different vegetables and some citrus fruits near Tokyo. Humidity is not important for most vegetables but asparagus. Japanese summer is veeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeery humid, and the high humidity level kills our asparagus sometimes because of this.
    [​IMG]

    I have a friend from Morocco and I visited her in Marrakech, Morocco. The temperature was 45 degrees, but it was better than 35 degrees in Japan because Marrakech is relatively near Sahara and very dry. So Tokyo can be more uncomfortable than Morocco in summer. Fortunately, our farm is very close to the Pacific Ocean, and sea breeze makes the farm cool enough, though.
     
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  13. Kelpieboy

    Kelpieboy One of Us

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    Well you learn something everyday , vegetable agriculture is not a speciality of mine so I will take your word on the subject. We are sheep graziers primarily so to us humidity isn't important.
     
  14. teckel

    teckel Old n' Crusty
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    Humidity is critical in fire behaviour. High humidity = less likely to burn. Low humidity = potential explosivity.
    Plants soak up the humidity and makes them more fire resistant. Low humidity sucks the moisture from leaves & other stuff. As an illustration, houses on a river bank are far more likely to survive a fire than those further away.

    Humidity also affects clothes on the clothes line (or in a drying room). Will dry much faster in low humidity. Again the air sucks the moisture out of the clothes.

    Most importantly, especially on a ski forum, it directly relates to the wet bulb temperature, at which snow can be made. It's also critical to snow falling. If the humidity is 10% and it's cold, it ain't gunna snow. If it's 100% humidity and it's below about 1 or 2 degrees, you can be pretty certain that snow will result.
     
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  15. Ramenman

    Ramenman One of Us

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    Well, actually, hot and humid at the same time is bad for some vegetables, not only asparagus. But we don't produce our vegetables in a greenhouse, and we don't want to use agricultural germicide, so we can't do anything even if we know it's very hot and humid, so it's not important for us to measure humidity. But still, we sometimes use agricultural germicide a bit in summer to our asparagus because Japanese summer around Tokyo is way too hot and humid for asparagus.

    Basically I'm more interested in humidity of our house, rather than humidity of our farm. Cold and dry = higher risk of flu, and winter around Tokyo tends to be very dry, and it's not good for our skin condition either. I want to keep my skin as young / beautiful as possible. So I want to keep the humidity level around 60%. Without a humidifier, room humidity can easily drop down to 20 - 30% around Tokyo in winter.
     
  16. skifree

    skifree Part of the Furniture
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    Humidity is usefull for working out dew points which is part of working out likely cloud formation & associated weather, morning dew, frost risk, calculating evaporation rates & so.

    But as noted above by observations of differing humidity at relatively close locations it is can also be very dynamic, a very slight change in temperature and / or pressure can change humidity.
     
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  17. Telemark Phat

    Telemark Phat Pass the butter
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    The plant needs metabolise the herbicide in order to be killed by it. When moisture is the limiting factor in plant metabolisation (very dry and hot conditions) a lot of invasive plants will rapidly respire (absorb the herbicide solution) and metabolise the pesticide. This rapid use of the herbicide solution can kill them very quickly. Up here using Grazon on St John's Wort can be super fast on the right day.
     
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  18. Majikthise

    Majikthise Sage
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    ^This also open stomates , take in the volatilised pesticide. High humidity> less volatility and for many invasives less gaseous exchange through the stomates
     
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  19. POW_hungry

    POW_hungry Part of the Furniture
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    Without knowing the locations (inclusive of aspects, topography and vegetation), I am guessing you have a couple of geographic variables affecting the data. There's no science to RH% & Dew Points, but localised anomolies are very common.
    You'd want to investigate the variables of the above factors to work out the anomalies, but I doubt there's an error in your weather station IMO.
     
  20. Lord Back Country

    Lord Back Country Hard Yards

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    Has anyone actually bought one of the ones off eBay which they would recommend?

    I think it would be a great way to get my kids interested in thinking and understanding about the weather. A Davis is too exxy for me, I’d spend up to $200, however.

    cheers

    LBC
     
  21. nfip

    nfip Part of the Furniture
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    Try this.
    Hooked it up yesterday, online now Weather Underground, seems ok to me first impression.
    Novelty for now but kids are checking out the data ....
     
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  22. Lord Back Country

    Lord Back Country Hard Yards

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    Many thanks, I'll check out Cosco on the weekend...

    cheers
     
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  23. nfip

    nfip Part of the Furniture
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  24. skifree

    skifree Part of the Furniture
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    I was looking at the Holeman weather stations in Bunnos. Then read some online reviews, they appear to have a few teething & quality issues to sort out yet. So I did not spend my $98.00 on one.
     
  25. teckel

    teckel Old n' Crusty
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    It may not be anything to do with faulty weather stations, but what crops you have planted close to the weather station, whether it's close to a water source, when you last irrigated etc.
     
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  26. Red_switch

    Red_switch Part of the Furniture
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    Humidity is very important for agriculture.
     
  27. Red_switch

    Red_switch Part of the Furniture
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    I can build and program a kick ass weather station for you. But it won't be cheap (but it will meet wmo standards if you want). Start here: https://www.campbellsci.com/

    Otherwise from what I've seen, Davis is probably the go.
     
  28. Kelpieboy

    Kelpieboy One of Us

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    Yeah , my bad. Don't know a great deal about agriculture being a grazier and I must admit when the local cockies start nattering away about stuff , well to be honest once we cover rainfall in the conversation my eyes glaze over and I tend to nod off a bit. I suppose they do they same when we start talking about animal husbandry and yard prices etc :confused:
     
  29. Ijay

    Ijay Hard Yards

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    I have a Davis Vantage Pro 2, purchased in 2008 for $600.00. Repalced the temp/humidity sensor 6 months ago for $120.00. It's been and is a good unit, the associated software makes it really good for record keeping. So now I've nearly ten years of data for my place.
    Not a cheapie but still good value, in my opinion.
     
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