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Hydration

Discussion in 'Backcountry' started by Sydlouise, Jun 11, 2019.

  1. Sydlouise

    Sydlouise Addicted

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    [QUOTE=" Using rehydration salts and a Camelback bladder and a drinking tube means sipping water , not guzzling it so you don't wee it all out by guzzling it . Plus the oral rehydration salts , when dissolved tend to reduce the volume of fluid you crave. Even when it is cool and sunny and you are XC skiing a long way in a day with varying terrain the ORS works well . In warm dry conditions for trekking such preparations are not optional. The 'Katadyn hiker pro filter ' can filter anything into potable clear water.[/QUOTE]
    Rehydration salts sounds like a great idea for next time. I used the Katadyn Combi which neither of us could physically pump at Mobbs swamp although it worked earlier in the hike at our other water points. I had scrubbed the ceramic filter really well before the hike and did some test pumps it was ok but must be clogged inside where the charcoal is I'll have to disassemble it and have a good look.
     
  2. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Rehydration salts sounds like a great idea for next time. I used the Katadyn Combi which neither of us could physically pump at Mobbs swamp although it worked earlier in the hike at our other water points. I had scrubbed the ceramic filter really well before the hike and did some test pumps it was ok but must be clogged inside where the charcoal is I'll have to disassemble it and have a good look.[/QUOTE]
    I had to replace to filter in my water filter. It was just blocked up, big time. It cost me 60 clams to replace it. Asolo hiking boots are a great investment. Look into that matter and you can thank me later.
     
  3. Xplora

    Xplora One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    I have heard that sipping from hydration packs is not a good way to hydrate. I am recalling something like a minimum of 100mls is needed each drink to effectively manage hydration and by sipping you get much less but end up using more water through the day because it is not as effective. I have thought maybe this is the reason why Mr T runs out of water on nearly every hike. I have used a hydration bladder from many years but recently started to change over to bottles and seem to manage it better. My partner changed over well before me and I think this convinced me to do the same. In areas where water is a problem, then I think the ability to carry 3 litres in a bladder still does make sense. The salts, as suggested by Mr. T are always a good idea. We use Hydralite often. Salts are depleted very quickly and some salts like magnesium take a while to replenish. Salts help with the movement of water in and out of cells and magnesium aids the electrical stimulus of cells. Sodium is still the most important salt for the body but always look for things with potassium and magnesium as supplements.
     
    Chaeron likes this.
  4. Moondog55

    Moondog55 One of Us

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    I have an unused bladder here, I stopped using sippers and bladders years ago and I have gone back to water bottles, with bottles you know how much water you have consumed and how much you have left.
     
    Majikthise likes this.
  5. Xplora

    Xplora One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Good job whoever moved this. Important subject. I can remember having to clean my MSR ceramic filter many times when filling up from the puddle at Mobbs Swamp. Back then we all had 3lt bladders and it took a long time. The MSR is great for muddy water but you have to clean it more when in dirty water. Fortunately it can be cleaned in the muddy puddle with a scouring pad. I only carry that now if the water is likely to be cloudy or full of silt.

    There is also a problem if you drink too much water and that can kill you. Basically you drown from the inside. More common in the middle to slow marathon runner who is out longer and stops at every drink station. Urine colour and smell will give you an idea of how you are doing unless of course you have been eating asparagus.
    This is very important but multiple bottles do weigh more. Maybe a small bladder and a bottle to decant into. Also easier to pour from a bottle to a cup and dissolve a salt tablet. When I was running ultra marathons I used to dissolve some Himalayan rock salt in my water bottle but it does not have magnesium.
     
    seak likes this.
  6. seak

    seak One of Us

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    There appears to be three unrelated things here; should I use rehydration tablets, should I use a bladder, the ceramic element of a mechanical water filter is hard to clean.

    Have taken a tube of Berocca tablets, and used half-tablet 4x per day. I think it worked on hot bushwalks, if just to have a yummy flavour when remote canyoning seemed a bit hard under a heavy pack. Still woke up stuffed on occasion. And by end of day two, only powder remained in the metal tube. (The metal tube is good for lures afterwards).

    Have taken Sports/hospital-grade Sustagen (get it from a large pharmacy - I don't think Colesworth sells it). Also; it is alot to carry if you go by manufacturers recommendations; three scoops (the scoop is big). I use it for protein replenishment at the end of the day, yet a couple of energetic guys I know pile it high on their muesli for brekky. I had a lot of it the last time we lapped Bass Strait, but still felt weaker every 2nd day or so - the other two guys did not touch the stuff, and were in party mode on the ferry back to Melbourne, while I was totally wasted.. When we circumnavigated Bruny Island, we had a diet of Sustagen on and in everything, although was kayaking into strong winds for the last three days, yet finished back at Snug feeling strong.

    A ceramic filter appears to clog easily - you need to take the scrubber with you; also filter through your double-folded shirt/other cloth first at Mobbs Soak (or the Hume and Hovell Track). This said, I was glad to sell a $420 Katadyn filter (bought 1994) for $90 - it had been carried when I MTB'd Cape York, and was used for less than 5 litres (and yes I did tell buyer of my frustration with the unit). I do not feel that I am well-travelled, but I would not bother with a hand-filter again - for anywhere.

    A tiny bottle of Betadine has worked well - IIRC; 6 drops per litre of collected water, and wait half-hour (and invert bottle to let betadine-treated water dribble over both threads). It can also be used 15 drops per half-cup of water for a sore-throat gargle, and applied neat to open wounds.
    I have said it twice before over the years on this forum; the biggest problem I have had bushwalking (mainly Wollemi NP and west coast Tasmania), long-distance cycle-touring, sea-kayaking and XC ski-touring, was finding any water at all.
     
  7. zac150

    zac150 One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    On the filter issue, I love the steripen, never had an issue with it albeit it used to chug batteries. I now have rechargeable batteries so not an issue.

    I have used rehydration tablets for years for long distance triathlons and then hikes. I’ve noticed other the last 12 months lots of hiking stores now stock them but i still get mine in bulk from wiggle. Lots of salts but no carbs, some people don’t like the no carbs but I prefer this.

    Lots of good brands like nuun and sis but my favourite is zero. If nothing else it is nice to have a slight flavour to the water. These are also great in resort, we carry soft drink bladders in our ski pants about 350ml and fill up a couple of times a day and just add half a tab. Much cheaper!

    I’m still a bladder fan as I’m not sure I subscribe to the theory of you have to drink x amount . That said I walk in areas water is easily obtained so for me it is drink as required and don’t try to ration. That said I subscribe to the regular drink theory I. E every 30 minutes take a drink.
     
    seak likes this.
  8. Kletterer

    Kletterer Thredbo Doughnut Tragic Moderator Ski Pass: Gold

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    Dried bananas on the march for your potassium needs.
     
  9. Untele-whippet

    Untele-whippet beard stroker Ski Pass: Gold

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    Bladder and steripen.
     
  10. Moondog55

    Moondog55 One of Us

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    Actually for the bladder I have it is the other way around
    CamelBack 3l bladder weighs 234g with the hose and bite valve. 1.25l PET bottle weighs 24g 600ml drink bottle weighs 31g 4 litre wine cask weighs 32 g. The small bottle weighs more because the large wide top is heavier. So for me carrying 3 liters it is a lower weight to use PET bottles. In over 30 years of using wine cask bladders to carry water I have never had one puncture in normal use while inside my pack but I did puncture one once accidentally dropping it onto a sharp object, although I did manage to rescue the contents
     
  11. Xplora

    Xplora One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    I used to carry wine bladders for water but found you can only use them a couple of times before some sort of problem occurs. PET bottles are the same but it could be the country we have walked that tends to crush them. In more open country I can see they are better but am thinking the wide mouth bottle seems to be the way to go. Mind you I did have a hydration pack for running and the seal busted at the bottom right at the start of a four hour training run. Apart from being very wet, I was not impressed with having no water. I should get some rechargeable batteries for the steripen. Good idea Zac.
     
  12. Ziggy

    Ziggy Repreived Ski Pass: Gold

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    How far do you have to stick it up?
     
    skifree likes this.