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LMB

Old but definitely not Crusty!
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Yes, with sore (oldies) back it did ring a bell!

(I’m not sure the younger, female, service staff in Hakuba (lifts, cafes, Black Cat, etc…) expected me to bow slightly - I didn’t think it soured the experience - as long as my back behaved!)
LOL
I’m having random thoughts about age competitions in bowing now!

Having oft had my age misjudged I am envisioning 2 people each mistakenly thinking the other is older than they are trying to out bow each other!
 
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Sandy

Dark Sith Lord of the Pool Room
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(I’m not sure the younger, female, service staff in Hakuba (lifts, cafes, Black Cat, etc…) expected me to bow slightly - I didn’t think it soured the experience - as long as my back behaved!)
Don't do it.
As service staff, they have to get the last bow in, so if you bow, they have to bow again.
 

Ramenman

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Well, foreign people (or even some Japanese people) tend to overstate Japan's seniority (because overstating can makes thing sound more interesting), I'll write about "real" seniority in Japan. That said, I'm making curry rice now, so I'll write later on (and this is tourism thread, not a culture thread, so we should not keep talking about it too long, IMO)
 
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Ramenman

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Well, foreign people (or even some Japanese people) tend to overstate Japan's seniority (because overstating can makes thing sound more interesting), I'll write about "real" seniority in Japan. That said, I'm making curry rice now, so I'll write later on (and this is tourism thread, not a culture thread, so we should not keep talking about it too long, IMO)


I finished making curry rice (and already ate it):p. I added "notorious" Natto (I like it and good for my health). The cup is Gran Deco's cup. Gran Deco is the ski resort I went to for the first time around 3 or 4 years old (the cup is 25+ years old). Jigpara Surf = the top left one is the lure which helps me catch flounders the most (one of my most favorite Surf fishing lures and I'll go fishing with it this afternoon as well!). 7 vegetables and mashrooms in the curry are the ones I grew by myself :cool:. Ooooooops, it's getting too off topic:whistle:
IMG_20220529_115510.jpg




IMO, people here in Japan start feeling seniority culture at the age of 13.

7 - 12 years old = elementary school, we don't feel seniority culture there.

13 - 15 years old = junior high school. 16 - 18 years old = high school. 13 - 18 = junior high and high school period is when we feel the seniority culture by far the most. Somehow, junior high schools and high schools in Japan tend to be a bit like army. Basically, there aren't many strange nor strict rules in elementary schools but we start seeing such rules in junior high school and high schools. I guess, 13 - 18 years old is very sensitive and difficult age. Good boys and girls can suddenly become trouble makers around the age. To deal with the difficult age or for another reason, schools suddenly become like army at the age of 13 (and it will end at the age of 18 and universities / colleges are no longer like army).

For example, Japan have quite many honorific titles such as -Sama, -San, -Senpai, -Chan, -Kun, etc. Name-Chan and Name-Kun are very frank and they sound friendly too. At elementary school, they use "-Chan and -Kun" to call upperclassmen's names. However, they suddenly start using "-Senpai" at junior high school. So, Ramenman-Chan becomes Ramenman-Senpai for them to sound polite to call an upperclassman = me.

Especially inside sport communities, seniority culture tends to be strong. In most elementary schools, club activities are not mandatory but in many junior high schools, joining at least one club activity is mandatory, so a lot of students belong to sport clubs (such as baseball, football, tennis, swimming and many others). Such sport clubs of junior high schools & high schools are even more army-alike (upperclassmen are like general officers)

However, once they graduate from high schools and become university students, seniority culture shrinks a lot, not completely die down yet, though. Once they start working after graduating from university, seniority culture shrinks further. I mean, nowadays, a lot of companies have rules that all employees call co-workers their names-San equally. I mean, most companies don't want to let their employees bring the seniority culture to their work places because they think seniority culture can make their business less competitive.

I have several jobs and one of them is an instructor of CATIA, Solidworks, Creo Parametric, etc (all are 3D CAD and CAE softwares), and I visit multiple engineering companies. Most of them have the rules (= the rules to avoid seniority culture spreading inside their workplaces). All people are required to use the polite honorific title of "-San" equally, regardless of their age.

We bow and use polite words often, but they are not because of seniority. Once we start working after graduating, we are adult working people and we should act politely enough as adult people unless we are talking to / with close friends (and family members). So, bowing, being polite, etc, it's nothing to do with seniority at all in most cases. I'm around 30 years old now, and I still sometimes see seniority culture around me, but I'd say it's a lot smaller than you may think.


That said, in sport communities, seniority culture tends to be still strong. Ski is a sport, so inside ski communities, you might feel more seniority culture.
 
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skichanger

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Well, foreign people (or even some Japanese people) tend to overstate Japan's seniority (because overstating can makes thing sound more interesting), I'll write about "real" seniority in Japan. That said, I'm making curry rice now, so I'll write later on (and this is tourism thread, not a culture thread, so we should not keep talking about it too long, IMO)
You have a lot to learn about these forums and Autralians. It is s very common fir threads to wander through various topics. It is what nakes this forum so interesting.

Do Japanese schools really use the USA format? Eg elementary school. This is quite different to the traditional school system in Aus.
 

skichanger

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I finished making curry rice (and already ate it):p. I added "notorious" Natto (I like it and good for my health). The cup is Gran Deco's cup. Gran Deco is the ski resort I went to for the first time around 3 or 4 years old (the cup is 25+ years old). Jigpara Surf = the top left one is the lure which helps me catch flounders the most (one of my most favorite Surf fishing lures and I'll go fishing with it this afternoon as well!). 7 vegetables and mashrooms in the curry are the ones I grew by myself :cool:. Ooooooops, it's getting too off topic:whistle:
IMG_20220529_115510.jpg




IMO, people here in Japan start feeling seniority culture at the age of 13.

7 - 12 years old = elementary school, we don't feel seniority culture there.

13 - 15 years junior high school and 16 - 18 = high school. And 13 - 18 = junior high and high school period is when we feel the seniority culture by far the most. Somehow, junior high schools and high schools in Japan tend to be a bit like army. There aren't many strange nor strict rules in elementary schools but we start seeing such rules in junior high school and high schools. I guess, 13 - 18 years old is very sensitive and difficult age. A good boy / girl can suddenly become a trouble maker around the age. To deal with the difficult age or for another reason, schools suddenly become like army at the age of 13 (it will end at the age of 18 and universities / colleges are no longer like army).

For example, Japan have quite many honorific titles such as -Sama, -San, -Senpai, -Chan, -Kun, etc. Name-Chan and Name-Kun are very frank and they sound friendly too. At elementary school, they use "-Chan and -Kun" to call upperclassmen's names. However, they suddenly start using "-Senpai" at junior high school. So, Ramenman-Chan becomes Ramenman-Senpai for them to sound polite to call an upperclassman = me.

Especially inside sport communities, seniority culture is strong. In most elementary schools, club activities are not mandatory but in many junior high schools, joining one club activity is mandatory, so a lot of students belong to sport clubs (such as baseball, football, tennis, swimming and many others). Such sport clubs of junior high schools & high schools are even more army-alike (upperclassmen are like general officers)

However, once they graduate from high schools and become university students, seniority culture shrinks, not completely die down, though. Once they start working after graduating from university, seniority culture shrinks further. I mean, nowadays, a lot of companies have rules that all employees call co-workers their names-San equally. I mean, the companies don't want to let the employees bring the seniority culture to their work places because they think seniority culture can make their business less competitive.

I have several jobs and one of them is an instructor of CATIA, Solidworks, Creo Parametric, etc (all are 3D CAD and CAE softwares), and I visit multiple engineering companies. Many of them have the rules (= rules to avoid seniority culture spreading inside the workplace). All people are required to use the polite honorific title of "-San" equally, regardless of their age.

We bow and use polite words often, but they are not because of seniority. Once we start working after graduating, we are adult working people and we should act politely enough as adult people unless we are talking to / with close friends. So, bowing, being polite, etc, it's nothing to do with seniority in many cases. I'm around 30 years old now, and I still see seniority culture around me, but I'd say it's a lot smaller than you may think.


That said, in sport communities, seniority culture tends to be still strong. Ski is a sport, so inside ski communities, you might feel more seniority culture.
We are not really exposed to corporate Japan and the whole salaryman thing. My experience is that people are still expected to and still do respect age.
 

skichanger

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Re bowing and elderly people being bent over. I had a guest who was a biomedical engineer. One of the products his company sold into Japan was rods for straightening people’s backs. The bent back is genetic. And in some cases after many years this genetic tendency for a bent back has significantly bent the straight steel rod surgically implanted in people’s backs.
 
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Ramenman

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Local media are reporting that the most expensive room of the new hotel opening at Appi Kogen this year is 1 million Yen per night and the occupancy rate is 70%. Since the hotel opened earlier this year till yesterday (May 31st), there weren't any tourists from abroad basically. I think 70% occupancy rate is very impressive. The international school is opening in late August, and the tuition is 9 million Yen per year (= the school is for very rich people), so 1 million Yen per night is cheap enough for the new people who are involved in "New Appi Kogen"?
 

Tanuki

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Local media are reporting that the most expensive room of the new hotel opening at Appi Kogen this year is 1 million Yen per night and the occupancy rate is 70%. Since the hotel opened earlier this year till yesterday (May 31st), there weren't any tourists from abroad basically but 70% occupancy rate is impressive. The international school is opening in late August, and the tuition is 9 million Yen per year, so 1 million Yen per night is cheap enough for the new people who will be involved in "New Appi Kogen"?
Wow, glad we stayed there a few years ago as we would be priced out now.
 
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Ramenman

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Local media (such as Travel Voice) are reporting that a lot of people from abroad are booking hotels in Niseko region for next ski season. It says quite many bookings are from Australia, Singapore, Hong Kong and USA.

The link of the original news
 

Ramenman

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In recent years, a lot of Japanese ski resorts are investing in green season facilities and they've been actually attracting more guests in green season compared to 5 - 10 years ago. And it seems Ishiuchi Maruyama (in Yuzawa) is opening another green season facility this August. Three images below are about the facility (they can be used in winter as well, but mainly for green season).
6867-62-2da134dad7b8b2861ead30b91a1aa69b-1930x1086.jpg


6867-62-37fd1dc551b05f506798c287ee85121c-3840x2160.jpg



This one looks like Hakuba Iwatake's one.
6867-62-e94711a200a34e3021cd6f1889fffd14-3840x2160.jpg
 
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Sandy

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In recent years, a lot of Japanese ski resorts are investing in green season facilities and they've been actually attracting more gusts in green season compared to 5 - 10 years ago. And it seems Ishiuchi Maruyama (in Yuzawa) is opening another green season facility this August. Three images below are about the facility (they can be used in winter as well, but mainly for green season).
6867-62-2da134dad7b8b2861ead30b91a1aa69b-1930x1086.jpg


6867-62-37fd1dc551b05f506798c287ee85121c-3840x2160.jpg



This one looks like Hakuba Iwatake's one.
6867-62-e94711a200a34e3021cd6f1889fffd14-3840x2160.jpg
Very similar design to the one at Iawatake at Hakuba.
 
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Ramenman

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A lot of new outdoor events and competitions are being held in Japanese ski resort regions. I showed some of them in this thread such as Shiga Kogen Hill Climb (cycle sport), Zao Hill Climb (cycle sport), etc. I know most people on this forum don't come to Japanese ski resort regions in green season, but I've seen some foreigners in those events. In such competitions, you are competing with the people in your age group. I mean, if you are 55 year old man, you can only compete with the people at the age of 50 - 59. A new sport event / competition is going to be held next month (=June 5th) on Urabandai Highland (one of our property sites). It's Ultra Marathon (100km one and 65km one). Ski slopes of three ski resorts are also parts of the ultra marathon such as Alts Bandai and Inawashiro ski resort). If I'm not posting at all in this forum for long in early June, it might be because I'm too exhausted due to the marathon. I know I won't complete, though:p
2022_poster_01-scaled.jpg






Shiga Kogen Hill Climb
p8QBgDDs_400x400.jpg

DT-9_DSC_1927.jpg




This one is Zao Hill Climb 2022. The picture was taken last weekend (May 22nd). The road is closed in winter and it had plenty of snow last weekend as you can see in the picture. Mountains are beautiful in green season as well.
file.jpg

A trail running event is held this month around Myoko Kogen as well.

The link : http://www.nature-scene.net/myoko/coursemap/

Long = Red = 45km. Short = Yellow = 7.6km. Vertical = Blue = 3.4km
screenshot.730.jpg



A lot of similar events are held in ski resorts in green season. And one ski region has multiple similar events. Speaking of Myoko - Kurohime - Madarao region, there are many trail running races and cycle races.
rem220413_10.jpg


Can be a good family event.
trrp_191018_02.jpg


Since I was born, marathon has been always popular in Japan. However, I feel "trail running" has been getting more popular in recent years. I keep visiting ski resort mountains (especially in Tohoku) since 20 to 25 years ago but when I was a kid - teenager, I think I didn't see train running events this many / often. It's popular, so we see this kind of magazines recently. The magazine features 150 trail running events (and many are around ski resorts)
01TR2017S.jpg
 
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Goski

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The vale Rusutsu uploaded a new video.

This trend towards expensive luxury apartments and hotels is the opposite experience to what I want i.e. smaller simple accommodation with interaction with locals and other guests, good food, lots of kanpai and fun without the glitz and wankery. Also it seems that at The Vale most activities are to be done in arty slow motion so don't plan on packing a lot of experiences into a day.
 

LMB

Old but definitely not Crusty!
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This trend towards expensive luxury apartments and hotels is the opposite experience to what I want i.e. smaller simple accommodation with interaction with locals and other guests, good food, lots of kanpai and fun without the glitz and wankery. Also it seems that at The Vale most activities are to be done in arty slow motion so don't plan on packing a lot of experiences into a day.
You are not their target market. Target market is wealthy Chinese families.
 

Nemps20

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When we were in Shiga in Oct 2019 they had a 100 or 200km Shiga Kogen Ultra Marathon. Looked like a pretty intense race. Lots of blood flowing.. I think better to watch and cheer the competitors on :cool:
 
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Ramenman

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When we were in Shiga in Oct 2019 they had a 100 or 200km Shiga Kogen Ultra Marathon. Looked like a pretty intense race. Lots of blood flowing.. I think better to watch and cheer the competitors on :cool:

It seems Shiga Kogen has several trail running races such as Shiga Kogen Extreme Trail, Shiga Kogen Mountain Trail, Shiga Kogen Sky & Sky Ultra Running. The video below is one of them. You'll try one someday;)?. Edit: There are many trail running races that anyone can join, not only serious athletes.
 

Ramenman

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You know none of this looks like fun.

Surely there are beer or sake or melon festivals?

Mountains = the sources of fresh water and some ski resort regions are traditionally famous for Sake breweries. Aizu region is one of them and I know local sake festivals. So, alcohol related festival + ski resort region is Yes, there are. Melon festival?. Hmm, I guess Yubari has one:p (Yubari is very famous for the pricy Yubari Melon)

Speaking of "Ski resort related festivals + Sake + foods", I like Fuji Rock Festival very much. Fuji Rock Festival is held at Naeba ski resort for 3 days in summer and a lot of world's famous musicians come and perform. The festival has numerous food stalls. I love eating and drinking at such music festivals held in beautiful ski resort mountains / forests.

About Fuji Rock Festival : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fuji_Rock_Festival

FUJI ROCK FESTIVAL'18 Aftermovie​



FUJI ROCK FESTIVAL'22 : 2 MONTHS TO GO!​



Some other random Fuji Rock Festival videos






Speaking of food / sake related food stall festivals, Yoyogi Park in Tokyo is famous for such festivals.
 
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Ramenman

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Speaking of food / sake related food stall festivals, Yoyogi Park in Tokyo is famous for such festivals.

In the previous post, I mentioned food stalls in Yoyogi Park. This is from last night's local TV news. It is reporting about the Vietnamese festival held in Yoyogi Park this week (there was a Cambodian festival held in Yoyogi Park last month). You see a lot of food stalls in the video. Before COVID-19 hit, I used to see similar events / festivals with a lot of food stalls almost every weekend in Yoyogi Park. Many food related festivals are held there as well. I think a lot of people spend a few days in Tokyo before or after skiing. So, visiting Yoyogi Park might be good in that it's located in the center of Tokyo's downtown = great accessibility. 
 
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M_G

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I've just received an email from a Japanese based tour agent, as follows...

"On June 7th, the Japanese government released guidelines for the reopening of Japan to foreign tourists.

The basic points of the plan are
  1. All travels into Japan must come in on “tours”. Tours can be any size.
  2. All tours must have a guide who stays with the tour throughout the period of the tour (airport to airport)
  3. Guests may only travel as per the itinerary submitted in advance. This means guests have no freedom at all. They are not even allowed to leave the hotel to go to a convenience store.
  4. Guests must abide by the Japanese regulations on virus transmission. (Mask wearing / washing hands etc)
  5. All tours must be handled through a Japanese Travel Agent.
These make travel for snow enthusiasts extremely difficult. As our understanding is that all guests must ski and the same resort as the group each day, and must have all meals etc planned out in advance. Of course, this is not impossible, but does limit the scope of activities guests can partake in. As responsibility for guests resides with the Japanese Travel Agent, these rules will probably be strictly enforced.

We are planning to register with this program over the next few days but the issues we see are
  • Getting enough “guides” may be an issue as there has been a larger exodus of people from the travel industry
  • Such restrictive tours will not be popular with visitors, with strict enforcement of tour conditions.
  • The aversion of many westerners to group tours
While nothing is locked in stone, we are hoping that these measures are temporary. There is an upper house election on July 10th in Japan, and at this stage no party has come out with a policy on opening Japan."

Seems to confirm there will not be any movement to free this up until at least after the election. Also it seems there is a concerted push by the big Japan agencies to lock up the inbound trade. :mad:
 

Donza

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I've just received an email from a Japanese based tour agent, as follows...

"On June 7th, the Japanese government released guidelines for the reopening of Japan to foreign tourists.

The basic points of the plan are
  1. All travels into Japan must come in on “tours”. Tours can be any size.
  2. All tours must have a guide who stays with the tour throughout the period of the tour (airport to airport)
  3. Guests may only travel as per the itinerary submitted in advance. This means guests have no freedom at all. They are not even allowed to leave the hotel to go to a convenience store.
  4. Guests must abide by the Japanese regulations on virus transmission. (Mask wearing / washing hands etc)
  5. All tours must be handled through a Japanese Travel Agent.
These make travel for snow enthusiasts extremely difficult. As our understanding is that all guests must ski and the same resort as the group each day, and must have all meals etc planned out in advance. Of course, this is not impossible, but does limit the scope of activities guests can partake in. As responsibility for guests resides with the Japanese Travel Agent, these rules will probably be strictly enforced.

We are planning to register with this program over the next few days but the issues we see are
  • Getting enough “guides” may be an issue as there has been a larger exodus of people from the travel industry
  • Such restrictive tours will not be popular with visitors, with strict enforcement of tour conditions.
  • The aversion of many westerners to group tours
While nothing is locked in stone, we are hoping that these measures are temporary. There is an upper house election on July 10th in Japan, and at this stage no party has come out with a policy on opening Japan."

Seems to confirm there will not be any movement to free this up until at least after the election. Also it seems there is a concerted push by the big Japan agencies to lock up the inbound trade. :mad:

Put a fork in it.

Season 2024 . :(
 
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gaz35

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I've just received an email from a Japanese based tour agent, as follows...

"On June 7th, the Japanese government released guidelines for the reopening of Japan to foreign tourists.

The basic points of the plan are
  1. All travels into Japan must come in on “tours”. Tours can be any size.
  2. All tours must have a guide who stays with the tour throughout the period of the tour (airport to airport)
  3. Guests may only travel as per the itinerary submitted in advance. This means guests have no freedom at all. They are not even allowed to leave the hotel to go to a convenience store.
  4. Guests must abide by the Japanese regulations on virus transmission. (Mask wearing / washing hands etc)
  5. All tours must be handled through a Japanese Travel Agent.
These make travel for snow enthusiasts extremely difficult. As our understanding is that all guests must ski and the same resort as the group each day, and must have all meals etc planned out in advance. Of course, this is not impossible, but does limit the scope of activities guests can partake in. As responsibility for guests resides with the Japanese Travel Agent, these rules will probably be strictly enforced.

We are planning to register with this program over the next few days but the issues we see are
  • Getting enough “guides” may be an issue as there has been a larger exodus of people from the travel industry
  • Such restrictive tours will not be popular with visitors, with strict enforcement of tour conditions.
  • The aversion of many westerners to group tours
While nothing is locked in stone, we are hoping that these measures are temporary. There is an upper house election on July 10th in Japan, and at this stage no party has come out with a policy on opening Japan."

Seems to confirm there will not be any movement to free this up until at least after the election. Also it seems there is a concerted push by the big Japan agencies to lock up the inbound trade. :mad:
north america for us
 

skichanger

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So the real question is will this continue till winter? If so they will have put all the small operators, including lodges, cafes etc, out of business. Seeing a lot less places open already.
 
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Sandy

Dark Sith Lord of the Pool Room
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Yokohama, Japan, Melb. Expat.
I've just received an email from a Japanese based tour agent, as follows...

"On June 7th, the Japanese government released guidelines for the reopening of Japan to foreign tourists.

The basic points of the plan are
  1. All travels into Japan must come in on “tours”. Tours can be any size.
  2. All tours must have a guide who stays with the tour throughout the period of the tour (airport to airport)
  3. Guests may only travel as per the itinerary submitted in advance. This means guests have no freedom at all. They are not even allowed to leave the hotel to go to a convenience store.
  4. Guests must abide by the Japanese regulations on virus transmission. (Mask wearing / washing hands etc)
  5. All tours must be handled through a Japanese Travel Agent.
These make travel for snow enthusiasts extremely difficult. As our understanding is that all guests must ski and the same resort as the group each day, and must have all meals etc planned out in advance. Of course, this is not impossible, but does limit the scope of activities guests can partake in. As responsibility for guests resides with the Japanese Travel Agent, these rules will probably be strictly enforced.

We are planning to register with this program over the next few days but the issues we see are
  • Getting enough “guides” may be an issue as there has been a larger exodus of people from the travel industry
  • Such restrictive tours will not be popular with visitors, with strict enforcement of tour conditions.
  • The aversion of many westerners to group tours
While nothing is locked in stone, we are hoping that these measures are temporary. There is an upper house election on July 10th in Japan, and at this stage no party has come out with a policy on opening Japan."

Seems to confirm there will not be any movement to free this up until at least after the election. Also it seems there is a concerted push by the big Japan agencies to lock up the inbound trade. :mad:
Not gonna happen. These "tours" are clearly booked on the basis that you must agree to the rules as they stand RIGHT NOW, but obviously subject to changes in govt rules & policy at a later stage. The travel agents need to cover themselves.
 

Donza

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Not gonna happen. These "tours" are clearly booked on the basis that you must agree to the rules as they stand RIGHT NOW, but obviously subject to changes in govt rules & policy at a later stage. The travel agents need to cover themselves.

Indeed.
So I wonder how many Australian travel agents that have sold accomodation to Australians have alerted them that their booking is null and void. Under the current rules?
Or I wonder how many Accomodation providers in Japan have taken bookings from people from OS? That won't be able to travel under current rules.
 
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mannyk

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Not gonna happen. These "tours" are clearly booked on the basis that you must agree to the rules as they stand RIGHT NOW, but obviously subject to changes in govt rules & policy at a later stage. The travel agents need to cover themselves.
Surely these are just transitioning steps, otherwise it will start to feel like their northern neighbors across the channel.
Hopefully by the end of the year it sorts itself out, a lot can and will happen in 6 months .
 

SnowRabbit

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Supposed to be handing over the readies tomorrow for my Qantas flights next January/February.
Interesting! They're quite happy to take your money with no guarantee we'll be able to enter.
If they don't open and I cancel I lose a heap with no travel insurance covering the cancellation fee.
 

TACKIE

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warmer climes
My plan at this stage is mid Feb to mid April ( with some side touristy things ). But I won't look at flights till very close to leaving. Just want to be sure of trouble free entry.
 
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Chux-sw

One of Us
Ski Pass
Aug 7, 2018
1,653
4,475
363
Where's My Jumper
I had just transfered some cash into YEN and am still thinking of taking the punt on some frequent flyer flights. At least the cancellation of QF redemption flights is relatively painless.
 

PMG

One of Us
Ski Pass
Jan 3, 2011
4,180
3,336
363
Sydney
I had just transfered some cash into YEN and am still thinking of taking the punt on some frequent flyer flights. At least the cancellation of QF redemption flights is relatively painless.
We're booked late Jan with JAL entirely FF points. We'll access whether we have to change/cancel our flights later in the year.
 
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skichanger

A Local
Ski Pass
Jan 1, 2012
9,838
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chaletmyoko.com
We are only taking penciled in bookings at the moment. Later on we be taking deposits and payments but with a full refund if due to Covid people are still unable to enter the country. Anyone interested in staying with us should message me as we already have some busy dates.
 

Donza

Dogs body...
Platinum
Apr 21, 2004
138,020
103,277
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woonona
I’m with you. If it is still organised tour groups by December, there are bigger problems. It’s just not sustainable.
I don't think it will still be organised tour groups by December either. As no one will come regardless.

However the nature of the current regulations, and how draconian they are. Makes me wonder whats in the pipeline . I feel Japan , in relation to tourists, is a long (until after next winter) way from away from simply "living with covid" in relation to their borders.

I worry about things like. What if i or a family member got covid. How would they or I handle being locked up in a Japanese medical clinic for 14 days?
 

gaz35

One of Us
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Aug 9, 2013
1,900
1,299
363
I don't think it will still be organised tour groups by December either. As no one will come regardless.

However the nature of the current regulations, and how draconian they are. Makes me wonder whats in the pipeline . I feel Japan , in relation to tourists, is a long (until after next winter) way from away from simply "living with covid" in relation to their borders.

I worry about things like. What if i or a family member got covid. How would they or I handle being locked up in a Japanese medical clinic for 14 days?
yep - those types of reactions are the concern
 

Donza

Dogs body...
Platinum
Apr 21, 2004
138,020
103,277
3,563
woonona
 
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