Review Lost Ski - Ski Retriever vs ResqSki vs Loc8tor vs TileApp vs Powder Cats vs Flagging/Surveyors Tape

Any

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Aug 23, 2015
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Everyone loves a yardsale, especially when you use your face to stop!
But in deep snow this can mean having to search for your skis afterwards.

Ski breaks don't work too well in powder and your ski can travel off >50meters away in some random direction, never to be found again.
Or worse, you could spend time looking. But your lost ski is right under your nose the whole time, just buried deep enough you cant feel it.

Over the course of a season in Japan I see at least 3 people a week digging around and searching for skis. I read about even more occasions on local forums and facebook groups.
Losing a ski might cost a day or two of your holiday, plus some insurance covered dollars in replacing your favorite pair. But the worst part is watching your friends ski away on that once-in-a-lifetime epic powder day, leaving you and your one remaining ski to walk your ass down the mountain.

The general population doesn't even know that it's possible to lose a ski, or don't believe it'll happen to them until its too late.
Even less know that there are options available to help prevent it.

People have come up with many solutions to the problem, from low tech leashes, to tri-antenna rf radio transmitter receivers.

I wanted a place to be able to point people to, so that I can say "I told you so". But I also was curious to see what other options are out there.
I identified several options available, and tested some of them. Thought I'd let you know the results.



Summary:

- Ski Retriever, ResqSki, Loc8tor, Tabcat
G34xRdI.jpg

(ski retriever attached to one of my pairs of skis)
DDSuDK7.jpg
tCrrmfe.jpg
S7kgJxp.jpg

These 4 brands are all effectively the same product, just packaged differently. Youll notice the handheld receivers are identical between each product and some of the transmitters are also the same depending on which series model you purchase.
These are rf radio transmitters. They work by placing a 2.45ghz radio transmitter on your ski, and you carry a small dedicated receiver.
You find your skis using exactly the same method you might locate an avalanche beacon, using the distance and direction information provided on the handheld receiver. The transmitter attached to your skis also make beeping sounds or music to help guide you.
FYI, Avalanche beacons use an internationally recognized dedicated beacon frequency of 457khz. These products don't interfere with your avi beacon, It'd be a pretty stupid product if they did! (not to mention, probably illegal)​

The advertised range is approximately 30 meters.

Pros:
  • Super accurate locating system and intuitive interface, especially if you've used avalanche beacons before.
  • You can expect to find your ski in less than 1 minute, usually faster.
  • Reported range of several hundred meters (>300meters if the stories are to be believed).
  • Light and discrete.
Cons:
  • Batteries can go flat.
  • Variable manufacture quality.
    Ski Retriever: Poor. Others: Good
  • More expensive that some other options ($100-$150 per set).
  • Cold hands.

Testing:
I stuffed the Loc8tor and Resqski devices in my freezer for a while, and put my skis outside, to cool down.
Then buried them under about 30cm of heavy wet snow and walked away.​
Ski Retriever:
I've used ski retrievers for many years. But I tested again now just for a fair comparison.
I got about 40 meters away before I lost signal.
Used the receiver to find my skis, with millimeter accuracy. I plunged my hand into the snow and it was so accurate I even stubbed my cold fingers on my bindings, ouch.
They're designed for skiing and have a good attachment system. Mine have taken many hits in lift lines/etc and not been damaged, and over the last 4-5 years they have worked exactly as expected/advertised in several real life lost ski situations.
The earlier handheld units are pretty poorly manufactured, however my 2015 model seems nice tho.

Ski Retriever, the company, doesn't seem to exist anymore.​
Loc8tor:
I tested a set of Loc8tors today, and got over 75meters away!
They also got me within the same millimeter accuracy of the transmitter.
Unfortunately they're not designed for skis, with no way to attach them or keep them waterproof.
Using ski retriever as inspiration I personally designed and sewed some rough pouches to attach them to my skis and for protection ..... actually mum did, thanks mum.
VeMOVUi.jpg
Even inside the custom pouch protectors they feel delicate. One even popped open and the battery flew out after some rough handling whilst packing them away.

I don't trust them to be reliable enough over the season.​
Resqski:
The Resqski locators I tested today also got the the same 75meter point as Loc8tor.
and also got me within the same millimeter accuracy.
They're also designed specifically to be attached to skis and feel like I could drive my car over them and not break them.
The ability to switch them on and off is going to be either an awesome plus, or a source of frustration.

I was impressed, I plan to use Resqski on my skis for the 2017/2018 season.​


- Marco Polo
Po1LGaT.jpg

Another rf radio transmitter technology, that seems to be especially popular with rc aircraft and drone pilots.
Works similarly to the other rf radio transmitters mentioned above, but on a 900mhz frequency range instead. Includes distance and direction indication, but with an update only every 10 seconds.
Because of the frequency in use, it appears to be illegal in some countries? (don't quote me on that)

Pros:
  • Super accurate locating system.
  • Advertised range of over 2 miles (3.2km).
Cons:
  • Bulky transmitter and receiver units (comparatively speaking).
  • Short battery life (30 days).
  • Slightly longer search time because of the 10 second pings.
  • More expensive ($300 for a set of two).

I thought this might be an interesting product, but after researching it more (and the cost) I decided not to even try buying one.



- TileApp, TrackR, Chipolo, Ski Tracer from Atomic, Powunity Neverlose
LKspvQM.jpg
F4srZai.jpg

These small Bluetooth devices (also 2.45ghz) were originally designed to help you find your car keys/etc, but I reckon they could be used to find skis too.
Some are even factory built into skis now too.
You connect to it using an app on your phone, you hit go, and the device starts beeping. You have a bit of a range guide on your phone to get you close, after that your only guide is to follow the sound.
FYI: Many advertisements for these products show a radar style image to make it appear that they provide distance and direction information, but they don't, its distance only.​

The advertised range is approximately 30 meters.

Pros:
  • Reasonably cheap ($10-$50)
  • Crowd search facility - eg, If someone who also uses TileApp happens to come within range of your lost ski, you'll be notified. Caveat, you usually don't have cell service in the mountains.
  • No need for a dedicated receiver, use your phone.
  • Most products usually waterproof
  • Ultra lightweight, so light in fact that I bet you could simply glue it to your skis and it'd be ok.
Cons:
  • Short range, <20 meters in ideal conditions.
  • Your primary guide is to follow the sound. Difficult to hear a beeping device buried in the snow, especially on a windy day (like when up on top of a mountain).
  • Batteries that can't be replaced for some models.
  • Variable manufacture quality (aliexpress version didn't even survive shipping, lol).
  • Some smartphones don't work in the cold because of safety cutoffs. iPhone 6, lol suckers!
  • Time consuming (really cold hands!).

Testing, TileApp:
I purchased a single TileApp tile for testing.
There are many other brands and generic products available, but I thought I'd better test the premium version first. $35 per tile seemed quite a ripoff tho!
I shoved it in the freezer with the other products before testing.
Then buried it in the same depth of snow for testing.

In my tests I got about 15-20 meters away before signal dropped out.
After waiting a minute or two for it to reacquire signal I slowly moved towards the target. You have only distance (no direction) to find the tile, And it doesn't update very quickly either (10-15 seconds per updates). Even knowing where my stash was, it was difficult and time consuming to find.
The range indicator became useless within about 3-4 meters, I couldn't tell if I was getting closer or further away.
I got within about 1.5 meters of the tile before I could finally hear its beeping music playing and was able to track it down from there. If it were loud outside, or windy (like in a real situation), there's no way that I would have heard it.
(in my earlier test indoors the beeping was so loud that it was uncomfortable, outdoors while buried in snow was a very different story)​
Even with touchscreen compatible glove liners, my fingers were freezing by the time I finally found it.​

Conclusion:
There's no way I'm going to rely on something like this to find my skis.​


- Powder Cats, Flagging/Surveyors Tape, String
You tie a long string/tape/cord to your skis that spools or pulls out when you lose the ski. The other end of the cord is not attached to you.
The idea is that the cord will float on top of the snow and remain visible, and/or it increases the chances of you finding your ski when sweeping with your ski pole.

Pros:
  • Cheap ($1-$10)
  • Potentially very fast to find. Faster than an electronic device, and no need to take gloves off!
Cons:
  • Must disconnect the cord every time you take your skis off. For example, Gondola & Cable cars. You look really silly when you forget.
  • The cord can be broken during a crash (eg flagging tape).
  • The cord can get lose during the day, especially after skiing fast or in strong winds, and can get tangled. If it comes lose, you also look like a super gaper skiing down a run with a bright colored ribbon flying after you (speaking from experience).
  • A short cord doesn't help much, but is easier to manage. A long cord might help more, but is more difficult to manage.
  • Time spent repacking after finding ski.
Testing:
I did a simple test today, I used the end of my ski pole and tried dragging the end of the ribbon under the snow to see if it might float to the top. The snow wasn't very deep and I got frequently got caught on stuff, but I was surprised to find that the end did still float towards the surface.
I still have not used such a product in a real life situation to find a lost ski, but I can see these working as a cheaper less convenient alternative to the rf transmitter products, so long as it didn't travel too far that you don't know where to look.


- Leashes
RxVo2a3.jpg

You attach a short cord to your skis, and attach the other end to your boots.
Usually these come with clips to make it easier to take on/off.

Pros:
  • Cheap ($5-$20)
  • Can prevent your ski from travelling miles away down a mountain.
Cons:
  • Must disconnect the cord every time you take your skis off. For example, Gondola & Cable Cars. Otherwise you fall over onto your face when you forget, everyone laughs. :cool:
  • Losing a ski in trees, roots or rocky terrain can mean the ski gets stuck. Risk of permanent damage to your bindings or boots.
  • Supposedly also the risk of ligament damage as it tries to pull your leg off.
  • And supposedly the risk that the ski can spring back and smack you in the back of the head. I really don't see that happening tho.
Testing:
I've used leashes only once when borrowing a friends pair of skis. The breaks were broken, and he had chosen to use leashes instead of fixing them (I'm surprised he didn't use duct tape really).
I immediately tripped over I forgot to detach the leashes while unclipping for the next gondola ride back up.

I've not tried leaches to prevent losing a ski in a real life situation.
Almost every tele skiier I see uses them, and many mountaineers with ultralight dynafit bindings appear to use them. However there are so many more forum posts and words of warning that I would damage my equipment or myself by using them.

- Crank your bindings up to MAX
Just crank your bindings up and they'll never fall off again. Solved!
Don't forget to flex your muscles and grunt a lot to prove how tough you are.
  • If you can't figure out pros and cons of this then you should probably switch to snowboarding.


- Get a dog
SToW7CD.jpg

You attach a piece of juicy bacon to your skis.
When you lose your ski, you ask Woodley to go find it.

Pros:
  • Batteries never go flat.
  • Friend for life.
  • Warm if you get cold.
  • Can tag unlimited skis and other devices you don't want to lose.
  • Remote controlled via voice commands.
  • Long range & high sensitivity.
Cons:
  • None!


- Switch to Snowboarding

Pros:
  • Never lose your skis
Cons:
  • Need new friends who won't leave you behind on the flat runouts.
 

sbm

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I use leashes, attached with a small loop of thin string, which in theory acts as a "fuse", that will break in a violent crash or avalanche (I tested it semi-scientifically bouncing my weight on a larger loop of the string and confirming that it broke).
 
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Tanuki

Part of the Furniture
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I use leashes, attached with a small loop of thin string, which in theory acts as a "fuse", that will break in a violent crash or avalanche (I tested it semi-scientifically bouncing my weight on a larger loop of the string and confirming that it broke).
Can you post a picture or a link? This is going to be my first trip to Japan as a skier (after 4 as a snowboarder) and have been contemplating options.
 

Legs Akimbo

Grumblebum
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I have used ribbons. They are fine if you are just riding surface lifts or chairs, but a total pain in the bum on gondolas and cablecars. It's not just clipping and unclipping. It's taking off gloves to clip and unclip' the things dropping out while you are skiing and the possibility that there is nowhere convenient on your bindings to clip them. But they work.
 
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skichanger

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Some great inf! We have had a few guests permanently loose skis. One poor guy, it was first turn with brand new hand made skis - eek!

Re leashes - pre brakes on skis that was what we all used all the time. You get used to them. And I don't remember lots of reports of injuries by being attacked by the ski. We use them at water ramp = otherwise it is a diving expedition to find your skis if they come off. You can buy ones for snowboards or make your own. You just need 2 clips and some string, rope, bungee cord, curly extension stuff etc.
 
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Tanuki

Part of the Furniture
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Some great inf! We have had a few guests permanently loose skis. One poor guy, it was first turn with brand new hand made skis - eek!

Re leashes - pre brakes on skis that was what we all used all the time. You get used to them. And I don't remember lots of reports of injuries by being attacked by the ski. We use them at water ramp = otherwise it is a diving expedition to find your skis if they come off. You can buy ones for snowboards or make your own. You just need 2 clips and some string, rope, bungee cord, curly extension stuff etc.
The Spring melt must reveal them, somewhere
 

Tanuki

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the sasa grass folds down buried in snow for winter, but doesnt die. as soon as the sun melts it springs back up again. 8 feet tall overnight.
cant see a damn thing.
Eternal Ski Graveyard
 
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Team Weasel

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I only use leashes now. Yes they are less convenient than brakes, but you will never lose a ski...which can be a big deal depending on where you are. Ice build up or steep, hard snow can render your brakes ineffective.

Install a fuse when appropriate if there's avalanche danger as said by @sbm. Also, make sure you secure to an appropriate point. I use the B&D leashes (which are excellent), but only had it looped around my boot. In one memorable fall, the leash slid all the way off my boot and took a ride. Now I thread it through a loop to secure it.
 

azzski

Should know better
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Some great inf! We have had a few guests permanently loose skis. One poor guy, it was first turn with brand new hand made skis - eek!

Re leashes - pre brakes on skis that was what we all used all the time. You get used to them. And I don't remember lots of reports of injuries by being attacked by the ski. We use them at water ramp = otherwise it is a diving expedition to find your skis if they come off. You can buy ones for snowboards or make your own. You just need 2 clips and some string, rope, bungee cord, curly extension stuff etc.
Just thinking "out loud", so to speak, but could premium snow lodges/chalets/etc could probably make money out of hiring the likes of Resqskis out? Maybe this is something you've considered, @skichanger or @Nozawaman ?
 

skichanger

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Jan 1, 2012
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Just thinking "out loud", so to speak, but could premium snow lodges/chalets/etc could probably make money out of hiring the likes of Resqskis out? Maybe this is something you've considered, @skichanger or @Nozawaman ?
I think a lot of the options are permanently attached to the skis. So you would have to find a system that attached temporarily.

We have thought a lot about cost effective options but no solutions yet.
 
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skichanger

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The biggest issue we have had is where the ski just keeps going under the snow for who knows how far. Perhaps with a leash, even if it breaks, it might slow the ski down a bit making it easier to find.
 

Any

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normally they're permanently mounted.
but my neighbor uses a small carabiner to attach the ski retriever pouch to his binding. its easily detachable and can be moved from ski to ski. he also loans them out to friends.
problem is, your bindings need to have a hole somewhere on them out of the way that might let this happen. mine dont.
 

DPS Driver

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I used to use ribbons, home made worked a treat but got lazy and haven't used anything for years.
 
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Any

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late update;
the resqski devices survived approx 120 days last winter, 80-90 of which were in resort with the hustle and bustle of lift lines and people running into my skis, and the rest backcountry.
the devices weren't screwed on as recommended. i just used the included doublesided tape and added a healthy dose of superglue to both ski, tape, and resqski base before sticking it down.
ive tested several times, but so far I haven't had to use them in a real life lost ski scenario.
im still on the original batteries, and while its a whole $3 via rakuten to get new batteries, ive decided to see how long they last before replacing them.

ive since added another pair of resqski to my skis, to a pair that have already seen about 10 days in resort and 2 in the backcountry.
note, the remote can take up to 2 pair of skis, so it was convenient and almost half price to add the 2nd pair.

IIYz9ub.jpg
 

benzerknees

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Oct 16, 2010
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Hi Any,

Where did you buy resqski ? I'm interested. The first time I came to nozawa , I had made my own leashes with long orange puppy leads that had some velcro around my boot as a "fuse", and a clip on the binding. Pushing the extra length of the lead up the ski pant length. But as previously said the repeated taking off the clip and gloves for gondalas was too much.

I have been at Nozawa for the last week, of almost continuous snow, and it has focused my mind again on such devices. ... Seeing people hunting for their skis. Have not lost any of mine yet, thankfully.

But I have also been googling compact emergency snowshoes or skiis or boards. There are a few designs out there, including inflatable but not sure if they take a skiboot.

One event that focused my attention was that I witnessed (slightly after the event) 3 guys who skied "over the back" who where unfamiliar with the area and had entered the area too low and got to above the cliffs, and slid down the cliff area on their backsides, one lost his skiis, which were still halfway up the cliff in tree branches, and was trying to climb back up to retrieve them. Luckily it was warmish, lunchtime, and sunny.
So it got me thinking that, if you are stuck, in waistdeep snow which is a lot of nozawa is at the moment, unless you can get some skis back on... you are stuck, and you may not be far from the lifts in the case of the Yamabiko area but still in danger if its cold, foggy and closing time ....Hence emergency snowshoes could help you or someone else, to walk out or even get your skiis back on. Boarders are not immune from the dangers of deep snow either.
 

Any

One of Us
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Aug 23, 2015
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Hi Any,

Where did you buy resqski ? I'm interested. The first time I came to nozawa , I had made my own leashes with long orange puppy leads that had some velcro around my boot as a "fuse", and a clip on the binding. Pushing the extra length of the lead up the ski pant length. But as previously said the repeated taking off the clip and gloves for gondalas was too much.

I have been at Nozawa for the last week, of almost continuous snow, and it has focused my mind again on such devices. ... Seeing people hunting for their skis. Have not lost any of mine yet, thankfully.

But I have also been googling compact emergency snowshoes or skiis or boards. There are a few designs out there, including inflatable but not sure if they take a skiboot.

One event that focused my attention was that I witnessed (slightly after the event) 3 guys who skied "over the back" who where unfamiliar with the area and had entered the area too low and got to above the cliffs, and slid down the cliff area on their backsides, one lost his skiis, which were still halfway up the cliff in tree branches, and was trying to climb back up to retrieve them. Luckily it was warmish, lunchtime, and sunny.
So it got me thinking that, if you are stuck, in waistdeep snow which is a lot of nozawa is at the moment, unless you can get some skis back on... you are stuck, and you may not be far from the lifts in the case of the Yamabiko area but still in danger if its cold, foggy and closing time ....Hence emergency snowshoes could help you or someone else, to walk out or even get your skiis back on. Boarders are not immune from the dangers of deep snow either.
you are correct, navigating deep untouched snow is relatively trivial if you still have your skis. but if you lose them you're up to your chest every step and probably take many hours to get out.
i saw this the other day https://snowbrains.com/four-colorad...-revelstoke-backcountry-after-11-hour-ordeal/ and i remember thinking that they probably followed a skiers tracks, who probably only took 15mins to ski out because it looks downhill the whole way, it reminds me of doing the minturn mile at vail. but they were mixed group with snowboarders unable to move in deep snow and took 11 hours instead.

im not aware of anyone importing resqski to Japan.
instead ive purchased from http://www.resqski.com/ directly, and also from https://thepisteoffice.com/. both did international shipping with no worries.
 

benzerknees

Addicted
Oct 16, 2010
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you are correct, navigating deep untouched snow is relatively trivial if you still have your skis. but if you lose them you're up to your chest every step and probably take many hours to get out.
i saw this the other day https://snowbrains.com/four-colorad...-revelstoke-backcountry-after-11-hour-ordeal/

im not aware of anyone importing resqski to Japan.
instead ive purchased from http://www.resqski.com/ directly, and also from https://thepisteoffice.com/. both did international shipping with no worries.

Thanks. I would import to Australia, as I will be home soon, for a future Japan year. (as thieves are the most likely way to lose a ski in Australia.)

Re the 11 hr ordeal..I thought this mistake a typical one that people make:

Anchoring – The tendency to hold tightly to one piece of information, this piece being the false confidence in assuming the people who had laid previous tracks knew where they were going.
 
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DidSurfNowSki

One of them
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I went the resqski path after reading @Any's post.

Delivery to Oz was extremely fast.

Instead of screwing or double sided taping the beacons onto the skis, I went for screw inserts as suggested by @skifree. I won't need these on the skis for our winter, so off they come when I get back home.

As for the mounting location, under the boots has worked very well in the Japan powder. No issues with snow build up or getting snow off the boots. As I ride the 1st gondola up in the morning I get out the transceiver and test that the system is working on the way up the hill :)

Very, very pleased with the result.
 

MarzNC

One of Us
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Jun 8, 2017
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over50skifitness.blogspot.com
- Powder Cats, Flagging/Surveyors Tape, String
You tie a long string/tape/cord to your skis that spools or pulls out when you lose the ski. The other end of the cord is not attached to you.
The idea is that the cord will float on top of the snow and remain visible, and/or it increases the chances of you finding your ski when sweeping with your ski pole.

Pros:
  • Cheap ($1-$10)
  • Potentially very fast to find. Faster than an electronic device, and no need to take gloves off!
Cons:
  • Must disconnect the cord every time you take your skis off. For example, Gondola & Cable cars. You look really silly when you forget.
  • The cord can be broken during a crash (eg flagging tape).
  • The cord can get lose during the day, especially after skiing fast or in strong winds, and can get tangled. If it comes lose, you also look like a super gaper skiing down a run with a bright colored ribbon flying after you (speaking from experience).
  • A short cord doesn't help much, but is easier to manage. A long cord might help more, but is more difficult to manage.
  • Time spent repacking after finding ski.
Testing:
I did a simple test today, I used the end of my ski pole and tried dragging the end of the ribbon under the snow to see if it might float to the top. The snow wasn't very deep and I got frequently got caught on stuff, but I was surprised to find that the end did still float towards the surface.
I still have not used such a product in a real life situation to find a lost ski, but I can see these working as a cheaper less convenient alternative to the rf transmitter products, so long as it didn't travel too far that you don't know where to look.
I've been using powder cords for deep powder days on resort for 6+ years. Since I average about 2 deep powder days a season during trips to big mountains (out of 25+ days), I rent demo skis for deep days when I get lucky and catch a storm. So not practical to use anything electronic. Bought a pair of cords after popping a binding on a relatively simple open slope (Ballroom at Alta). Luckily was with friends, and one spotted my ski was way below me on top of the snow. I couldn't see it at all from where I was standing and didn't want to move too much.

Have had a few times when the powder cord(s) came in handy in snow over 2 feet (not quite a meter). None of the falls were yard sales, but in all cases it was easier to retrieve the ski because all I had to do was spot the cord and pull on it instead of having to get close to the ski itself. Came in handy last month at Alta during a storm cycle that dropped 50 inches in 3 days. Low visibility while it was snowing with strong winds led to a double eject when I didn't see a snow drift that isn't usually there. Soft landing but neither ski was visible just behind and under me. The powder cords were easy to spot so I didn't have to stand up and start hunting.

I was taught to use a ski to search for a lost ski in the snow, not a ski pole.
 
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Heinz

Fully vaccinated but nowhere to go
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I was taught to use a ski to search for a lost ski in the snow, not a ski pole.

That should be a no brainer, but it seems it isn't. I've often seen people randomly poking around in the snow for buried skis for ages with a ski pole - it is truly hit and miss. I then used a ski dragging it through the snow vertically so you cover more ground and go deeper and usually located their ski within a minute or two. Also helps if they have stopped immediately after losing their ski rather than tumbling on downhill.
 
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Songsparrow

First Runs
Oct 5, 2019
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Everyone loves a yardsale, especially when you use your face to stop!
But in deep snow this can mean having to search for your skis afterwards.

Ski breaks don't work too well in powder and your ski can travel off >50meters away in some random direction, never to be found again.
Or worse, you could spend time looking. But your lost ski is right under your nose the whole time, just buried deep enough you cant feel it.

Over the course of a season in Japan I see at least 3 people a week digging around and searching for skis. I read about even more occasions on local forums and facebook groups.
Losing a ski might cost a day or two of your holiday, plus some insurance covered dollars in replacing your favorite pair. But the worst part is watching your friends ski away on that once-in-a-lifetime epic powder day, leaving you and your one remaining ski to walk your ass down the mountain.

The general population doesn't even know that it's possible to lose a ski, or don't believe it'll happen to them until its too late.
Even less know that there are options available to help prevent it.

People have come up with many solutions to the problem, from low tech leashes, to tri-antenna rf radio transmitter receivers.

I wanted a place to be able to point people to, so that I can say "I told you so". But I also was curious to see what other options are out there.
I identified several options available, and tested some of them. Thought I'd let you know the results.



Summary:

- Ski Retriever, ResqSki, Loc8tor, Tabcat
G34xRdI.jpg

(ski retriever attached to one of my pairs of skis)
DDSuDK7.jpg
tCrrmfe.jpg
S7kgJxp.jpg

These 4 brands are all effectively the same product, just packaged differently. Youll notice the handheld receivers are identical between each product and some of the transmitters are also the same depending on which series model you purchase.
These are rf radio transmitters. They work by placing a 2.45ghz radio transmitter on your ski, and you carry a small dedicated receiver.
You find your skis using exactly the same method you might locate an avalanche beacon, using the distance and direction information provided on the handheld receiver. The transmitter attached to your skis also make beeping sounds or music to help guide you.
FYI, Avalanche beacons use an internationally recognized dedicated beacon frequency of 457khz. These products don't interfere with your avi beacon, It'd be a pretty stupid product if they did! (not to mention, probably illegal)​

The advertised range is approximately 30 meters.

Pros:
  • Super accurate locating system and intuitive interface, especially if you've used avalanche beacons before.
  • You can expect to find your ski in less than 1 minute, usually faster.
  • Reported range of several hundred meters (>300meters if the stories are to be believed).
  • Light and discrete.
Cons:
  • Batteries can go flat.
  • Variable manufacture quality.
    Ski Retriever: Poor. Others: Good
  • More expensive that some other options ($100-$150 per set).
  • Cold hands.

Testing:
I stuffed the Loc8tor and Resqski devices in my freezer for a while, and put my skis outside, to cool down.
Then buried them under about 30cm of heavy wet snow and walked away.​
Ski Retriever:
I've used ski retrievers for many years. But I tested again now just for a fair comparison.
I got about 40 meters away before I lost signal.
Used the receiver to find my skis, with millimeter accuracy. I plunged my hand into the snow and it was so accurate I even stubbed my cold fingers on my bindings, ouch.
They're designed for skiing and have a good attachment system. Mine have taken many hits in lift lines/etc and not been damaged, and over the last 4-5 years they have worked exactly as expected/advertised in several real life lost ski situations.
The earlier handheld units are pretty poorly manufactured, however my 2015 model seems nice tho.

Ski Retriever, the company, doesn't seem to exist anymore.​
Loc8tor:
I tested a set of Loc8tors today, and got over 75meters away!
They also got me within the same millimeter accuracy of the transmitter.
Unfortunately they're not designed for skis, with no way to attach them or keep them waterproof.
Using ski retriever as inspiration I personally designed and sewed some rough pouches to attach them to my skis and for protection ..... actually mum did, thanks mum.
VeMOVUi.jpg
Even inside the custom pouch protectors they feel delicate. One even popped open and the battery flew out after some rough handling whilst packing them away.

I don't trust them to be reliable enough over the season.​
Resqski:
The Resqski locators I tested today also got the the same 75meter point as Loc8tor.
and also got me within the same millimeter accuracy.
They're also designed specifically to be attached to skis and feel like I could drive my car over them and not break them.
The ability to switch them on and off is going to be either an awesome plus, or a source of frustration.

I was impressed, I plan to use Resqski on my skis for the 2017/2018 season.​


- Marco Polo
Po1LGaT.jpg

Another rf radio transmitter technology, that seems to be especially popular with rc aircraft and drone pilots.
Works similarly to the other rf radio transmitters mentioned above, but on a 900mhz frequency range instead. Includes distance and direction indication, but with an update only every 10 seconds.
Because of the frequency in use, it appears to be illegal in some countries? (don't quote me on that)

Pros:
  • Super accurate locating system.
  • Advertised range of over 2 miles (3.2km).
Cons:
  • Bulky transmitter and receiver units (comparatively speaking).
  • Short battery life (30 days).
  • Slightly longer search time because of the 10 second pings.
  • More expensive ($300 for a set of two).

I thought this might be an interesting product, but after researching it more (and the cost) I decided not to even try buying one.



- TileApp, TrackR, Chipolo, Ski Tracer from Atomic, Powunity Neverlose
LKspvQM.jpg
F4srZai.jpg

These small Bluetooth devices (also 2.45ghz) were originally designed to help you find your car keys/etc, but I reckon they could be used to find skis too.
Some are even factory built into skis now too.
You connect to it using an app on your phone, you hit go, and the device starts beeping. You have a bit of a range guide on your phone to get you close, after that your only guide is to follow the sound.
FYI: Many advertisements for these products show a radar style image to make it appear that they provide distance and direction information, but they don't, its distance only.​

The advertised range is approximately 30 meters.

Pros:
  • Reasonably cheap ($10-$50)
  • Crowd search facility - eg, If someone who also uses TileApp happens to come within range of your lost ski, you'll be notified. Caveat, you usually don't have cell service in the mountains.
  • No need for a dedicated receiver, use your phone.
  • Most products usually waterproof
  • Ultra lightweight, so light in fact that I bet you could simply glue it to your skis and it'd be ok.
Cons:
  • Short range, <20 meters in ideal conditions.
  • Your primary guide is to follow the sound. Difficult to hear a beeping device buried in the snow, especially on a windy day (like when up on top of a mountain).
  • Batteries that can't be replaced for some models.
  • Variable manufacture quality (aliexpress version didn't even survive shipping, lol).
  • Some smartphones don't work in the cold because of safety cutoffs. iPhone 6, lol suckers!
  • Time consuming (really cold hands!).

Testing, TileApp:
I purchased a single TileApp tile for testing.
There are many other brands and generic products available, but I thought I'd better test the premium version first. $35 per tile seemed quite a ripoff tho!
I shoved it in the freezer with the other products before testing.
Then buried it in the same depth of snow for testing.

In my tests I got about 15-20 meters away before signal dropped out.
After waiting a minute or two for it to reacquire signal I slowly moved towards the target. You have only distance (no direction) to find the tile, And it doesn't update very quickly either (10-15 seconds per updates). Even knowing where my stash was, it was difficult and time consuming to find.
The range indicator became useless within about 3-4 meters, I couldn't tell if I was getting closer or further away.
I got within about 1.5 meters of the tile before I could finally hear its beeping music playing and was able to track it down from there. If it were loud outside, or windy (like in a real situation), there's no way that I would have heard it.
(in my earlier test indoors the beeping was so loud that it was uncomfortable, outdoors while buried in snow was a very different story)​
Even with touchscreen compatible glove liners, my fingers were freezing by the time I finally found it.​

Conclusion:
There's no way I'm going to rely on something like this to find my skis.​


- Powder Cats, Flagging/Surveyors Tape, String
You tie a long string/tape/cord to your skis that spools or pulls out when you lose the ski. The other end of the cord is not attached to you.
The idea is that the cord will float on top of the snow and remain visible, and/or it increases the chances of you finding your ski when sweeping with your ski pole.

Pros:
  • Cheap ($1-$10)
  • Potentially very fast to find. Faster than an electronic device, and no need to take gloves off!
Cons:
  • Must disconnect the cord every time you take your skis off. For example, Gondola & Cable cars. You look really silly when you forget.
  • The cord can be broken during a crash (eg flagging tape).
  • The cord can get lose during the day, especially after skiing fast or in strong winds, and can get tangled. If it comes lose, you also look like a super gaper skiing down a run with a bright colored ribbon flying after you (speaking from experience).
  • A short cord doesn't help much, but is easier to manage. A long cord might help more, but is more difficult to manage.
  • Time spent repacking after finding ski.
Testing:
I did a simple test today, I used the end of my ski pole and tried dragging the end of the ribbon under the snow to see if it might float to the top. The snow wasn't very deep and I got frequently got caught on stuff, but I was surprised to find that the end did still float towards the surface.
I still have not used such a product in a real life situation to find a lost ski, but I can see these working as a cheaper less convenient alternative to the rf transmitter products, so long as it didn't travel too far that you don't know where to look.


- Leashes
RxVo2a3.jpg

You attach a short cord to your skis, and attach the other end to your boots.
Usually these come with clips to make it easier to take on/off.

Pros:
  • Cheap ($5-$20)
  • Can prevent your ski from travelling miles away down a mountain.
Cons:
  • Must disconnect the cord every time you take your skis off. For example, Gondola & Cable Cars. Otherwise you fall over onto your face when you forget, everyone laughs. :cool:
  • Losing a ski in trees, roots or rocky terrain can mean the ski gets stuck. Risk of permanent damage to your bindings or boots.
  • Supposedly also the risk of ligament damage as it tries to pull your leg off.
  • And supposedly the risk that the ski can spring back and smack you in the back of the head. I really don't see that happening tho.
Testing:
I've used leashes only once when borrowing a friends pair of skis. The breaks were broken, and he had chosen to use leashes instead of fixing them (I'm surprised he didn't use duct tape really).
I immediately tripped over I forgot to detach the leashes while unclipping for the next gondola ride back up.

I've not tried leaches to prevent losing a ski in a real life situation.
Almost every tele skiier I see uses them, and many mountaineers with ultralight dynafit bindings appear to use them. However there are so many more forum posts and words of warning that I would damage my equipment or myself by using them.

- Crank your bindings up to MAX
Just crank your bindings up and they'll never fall off again. Solved!
Don't forget to flex your muscles and grunt a lot to prove how tough you are.
  • If you can't figure out pros and cons of this then you should probably switch to snowboarding.


- Get a dog
SToW7CD.jpg

You attach a piece of juicy bacon to your skis.
When you lose your ski, you ask Woodley to go find it.

Pros:
  • Batteries never go flat.
  • Friend for life.
  • Warm if you get cold.
  • Can tag unlimited skis and other devices you don't want to lose.
  • Remote controlled via voice commands.
  • Long range & high sensitivity.
Cons:
  • None!


- Switch to Snowboarding

Pros:
  • Never lose your skis
Cons:
  • Need new friends who won't leave you behind on the flat runouts.
OOU9pIG.jpg


Everyone loves a yardsale, especially when you use your face to stop!
But in deep snow this can mean having to search for your skis afterwards.

Ski breaks don't work too well in powder and your ski can travel off >50meters away in some random direction, never to be found again.
Or worse, you could spend time looking. But your lost ski is right under your nose the whole time, just buried deep enough you cant feel it.

Over the course of a season in Japan I see at least 3 people a week digging around and searching for skis. I read about even more occasions on local forums and facebook groups.
Losing a ski might cost a day or two of your holiday, plus some insurance covered dollars in replacing your favorite pair. But the worst part is watching your friends ski away on that once-in-a-lifetime epic powder day, leaving you and your one remaining ski to walk your ass down the mountain.

The general population doesn't even know that it's possible to lose a ski, or don't believe it'll happen to them until its too late.
Even less know that there are options available to help prevent it.

People have come up with many solutions to the problem, from low tech leashes, to tri-antenna rf radio transmitter receivers.

I wanted a place to be able to point people to, so that I can say "I told you so". But I also was curious to see what other options are out there.
I identified several options available, and tested some of them. Thought I'd let you know the results.



Summary:

- Ski Retriever, ResqSki, Loc8tor, Tabcat
G34xRdI.jpg

(ski retriever attached to one of my pairs of skis)
DDSuDK7.jpg
tCrrmfe.jpg
S7kgJxp.jpg

These 4 brands are all effectively the same product, just packaged differently. Youll notice the handheld receivers are identical between each product and some of the transmitters are also the same depending on which series model you purchase.
These are rf radio transmitters. They work by placing a 2.45ghz radio transmitter on your ski, and you carry a small dedicated receiver.
You find your skis using exactly the same method you might locate an avalanche beacon, using the distance and direction information provided on the handheld receiver. The transmitter attached to your skis also make beeping sounds or music to help guide you.
FYI, Avalanche beacons use an internationally recognized dedicated beacon frequency of 457khz. These products don't interfere with your avi beacon, It'd be a pretty stupid product if they did! (not to mention, probably illegal)​

The advertised range is approximately 30 meters.

Pros:
  • Super accurate locating system and intuitive interface, especially if you've used avalanche beacons before.
  • You can expect to find your ski in less than 1 minute, usually faster.
  • Reported range of several hundred meters (>300meters if the stories are to be believed).
  • Light and discrete.
Cons:
  • Batteries can go flat.
  • Variable manufacture quality.
    Ski Retriever: Poor. Others: Good
  • More expensive that some other options ($100-$150 per set).
  • Cold hands.

Testing:
I stuffed the Loc8tor and Resqski devices in my freezer for a while, and put my skis outside, to cool down.
Then buried them under about 30cm of heavy wet snow and walked away.​
Ski Retriever:
I've used ski retrievers for many years. But I tested again now just for a fair comparison.
I got about 40 meters away before I lost signal.
Used the receiver to find my skis, with millimeter accuracy. I plunged my hand into the snow and it was so accurate I even stubbed my cold fingers on my bindings, ouch.
They're designed for skiing and have a good attachment system. Mine have taken many hits in lift lines/etc and not been damaged, and over the last 4-5 years they have worked exactly as expected/advertised in several real life lost ski situations.
The earlier handheld units are pretty poorly manufactured, however my 2015 model seems nice tho.

Ski Retriever, the company, doesn't seem to exist anymore.​
Loc8tor:
I tested a set of Loc8tors today, and got over 75meters away!
They also got me within the same millimeter accuracy of the transmitter.
Unfortunately they're not designed for skis, with no way to attach them or keep them waterproof.
Using ski retriever as inspiration I personally designed and sewed some rough pouches to attach them to my skis and for protection ..... actually mum did, thanks mum.
VeMOVUi.jpg
Even inside the custom pouch protectors they feel delicate. One even popped open and the battery flew out after some rough handling whilst packing them away.

I don't trust them to be reliable enough over the season.​
Resqski:
The Resqski locators I tested today also got the the same 75meter point as Loc8tor.
and also got me within the same millimeter accuracy.
They're also designed specifically to be attached to skis and feel like I could drive my car over them and not break them.
The ability to switch them on and off is going to be either an awesome plus, or a source of frustration.

I was impressed, I plan to use Resqski on my skis for the 2017/2018 season.​


- Marco Polo
Po1LGaT.jpg

Another rf radio transmitter technology, that seems to be especially popular with rc aircraft and drone pilots.
Works similarly to the other rf radio transmitters mentioned above, but on a 900mhz frequency range instead. Includes distance and direction indication, but with an update only every 10 seconds.
Because of the frequency in use, it appears to be illegal in some countries? (don't quote me on that)

Pros:
  • Super accurate locating system.
  • Advertised range of over 2 miles (3.2km).
Cons:
  • Bulky transmitter and receiver units (comparatively speaking).
  • Short battery life (30 days).
  • Slightly longer search time because of the 10 second pings.
  • More expensive ($300 for a set of two).

I thought this might be an interesting product, but after researching it more (and the cost) I decided not to even try buying one.



- TileApp, TrackR, Chipolo, Ski Tracer from Atomic, Powunity Neverlose
LKspvQM.jpg
F4srZai.jpg

These small Bluetooth devices (also 2.45ghz) were originally designed to help you find your car keys/etc, but I reckon they could be used to find skis too.
Some are even factory built into skis now too.
You connect to it using an app on your phone, you hit go, and the device starts beeping. You have a bit of a range guide on your phone to get you close, after that your only guide is to follow the sound.
FYI: Many advertisements for these products show a radar style image to make it appear that they provide distance and direction information, but they don't, its distance only.​

The advertised range is approximately 30 meters.

Pros:
  • Reasonably cheap ($10-$50)
  • Crowd search facility - eg, If someone who also uses TileApp happens to come within range of your lost ski, you'll be notified. Caveat, you usually don't have cell service in the mountains.
  • No need for a dedicated receiver, use your phone.
  • Most products usually waterproof
  • Ultra lightweight, so light in fact that I bet you could simply glue it to your skis and it'd be ok.
Cons:
  • Short range, <20 meters in ideal conditions.
  • Your primary guide is to follow the sound. Difficult to hear a beeping device buried in the snow, especially on a windy day (like when up on top of a mountain).
  • Batteries that can't be replaced for some models.
  • Variable manufacture quality (aliexpress version didn't even survive shipping, lol).
  • Some smartphones don't work in the cold because of safety cutoffs. iPhone 6, lol suckers!
  • Time consuming (really cold hands!).

Testing, TileApp:
I purchased a single TileApp tile for testing.
There are many other brands and generic products available, but I thought I'd better test the premium version first. $35 per tile seemed quite a ripoff tho!
I shoved it in the freezer with the other products before testing.
Then buried it in the same depth of snow for testing.

In my tests I got about 15-20 meters away before signal dropped out.
After waiting a minute or two for it to reacquire signal I slowly moved towards the target. You have only distance (no direction) to find the tile, And it doesn't update very quickly either (10-15 seconds per updates). Even knowing where my stash was, it was difficult and time consuming to find.
The range indicator became useless within about 3-4 meters, I couldn't tell if I was getting closer or further away.
I got within about 1.5 meters of the tile before I could finally hear its beeping music playing and was able to track it down from there. If it were loud outside, or windy (like in a real situation), there's no way that I would have heard it.
(in my earlier test indoors the beeping was so loud that it was uncomfortable, outdoors while buried in snow was a very different story)​
Even with touchscreen compatible glove liners, my fingers were freezing by the time I finally found it.​

Conclusion:
There's no way I'm going to rely on something like this to find my skis.​


- Powder Cats, Flagging/Surveyors Tape, String
You tie a long string/tape/cord to your skis that spools or pulls out when you lose the ski. The other end of the cord is not attached to you.
The idea is that the cord will float on top of the snow and remain visible, and/or it increases the chances of you finding your ski when sweeping with your ski pole.

Pros:
  • Cheap ($1-$10)
  • Potentially very fast to find. Faster than an electronic device, and no need to take gloves off!
Cons:
  • Must disconnect the cord every time you take your skis off. For example, Gondola & Cable cars. You look really silly when you forget.
  • The cord can be broken during a crash (eg flagging tape).
  • The cord can get lose during the day, especially after skiing fast or in strong winds, and can get tangled. If it comes lose, you also look like a super gaper skiing down a run with a bright colored ribbon flying after you (speaking from experience).
  • A short cord doesn't help much, but is easier to manage. A long cord might help more, but is more difficult to manage.
  • Time spent repacking after finding ski.
Testing:
I did a simple test today, I used the end of my ski pole and tried dragging the end of the ribbon under the snow to see if it might float to the top. The snow wasn't very deep and I got frequently got caught on stuff, but I was surprised to find that the end did still float towards the surface.
I still have not used such a product in a real life situation to find a lost ski, but I can see these working as a cheaper less convenient alternative to the rf transmitter products, so long as it didn't travel too far that you don't know where to look.


- Leashes
RxVo2a3.jpg

You attach a short cord to your skis, and attach the other end to your boots.
Usually these come with clips to make it easier to take on/off.

Pros:
  • Cheap ($5-$20)
  • Can prevent your ski from travelling miles away down a mountain.
Cons:
  • Must disconnect the cord every time you take your skis off. For example, Gondola & Cable Cars. Otherwise you fall over onto your face when you forget, everyone laughs. :cool:
  • Losing a ski in trees, roots or rocky terrain can mean the ski gets stuck. Risk of permanent damage to your bindings or boots.
  • Supposedly also the risk of ligament damage as it tries to pull your leg off.
  • And supposedly the risk that the ski can spring back and smack you in the back of the head. I really don't see that happening tho.
Testing:
I've used leashes only once when borrowing a friends pair of skis. The breaks were broken, and he had chosen to use leashes instead of fixing them (I'm surprised he didn't use duct tape really).
I immediately tripped over I forgot to detach the leashes while unclipping for the next gondola ride back up.

I've not tried leaches to prevent losing a ski in a real life situation.
Almost every tele skiier I see uses them, and many mountaineers with ultralight dynafit bindings appear to use them. However there are so many more forum posts and words of warning that I would damage my equipment or myself by using them.

- Crank your bindings up to MAX
Just crank your bindings up and they'll never fall off again. Solved!
Don't forget to flex your muscles and grunt a lot to prove how tough you are.
  • If you can't figure out pros and cons of this then you should probably switch to snowboarding.


- Get a dog
SToW7CD.jpg

You attach a piece of juicy bacon to your skis.
When you lose your ski, you ask Woodley to go find it.

Pros:
  • Batteries never go flat.
  • Friend for life.
  • Warm if you get cold.
  • Can tag unlimited skis and other devices you don't want to lose.
  • Remote controlled via voice commands.
  • Long range & high sensitivity.
Cons:
  • None!


- Switch to Snowboarding

Pros:
  • Never lose your skis
Cons:
  • Need new friends who won't leave you behind on the flat runouts.
 

Songsparrow

First Runs
Oct 5, 2019
2
2
1
Thanks for all your effort around this review. The info is worthy and useful.
I've decided I'll have a set of resqski on my boards this winter.
Looking back to the days before ski brakes; the skis were longer, attached by ski straps as we called them in Canada, and a moderate to high speed fall on hardpack sometimes resulted in windmilling of skis. As a pro patroller, many times I attended nasty gashes on the head and face from these falls.
During avalanche work we always detached straps.
Today, skis are shorter by 20-30cm and even with leashes the windmilling might be less of an issue.
Losing a ski at a resort is an inconvenience. Losing a ski on a multi-day tour in serious wilderness is...
Love the resqski idea.
 
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Spence

One of Us
Ski Pass
Mar 16, 2019
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Sydney
The timing of the revival of this thread has coincided with me researching solutions for my Japan trip. Back in the day I used to max out to din settings on my bindings. On deep days I would add fluro powder ribbons. Attached to the bindings and tape stuffed up under the gaiter of my ski pants. I don’t recall it being a huge issue as after the initial gondola ride to get up the mountain I never really took my skis off again. I still have my original ribbons. Must’ve 30+ years old now. I really like the idea of putting a key ring loop on the binding and a light weight karabiner on the end of the ribbon. Has anyone tried the powder cords that sit in a pouch and strap to your boot? I was thinking of this type of product. How much of a PITA are they if putting boots in walk mode?
 

Any

One of Us
Ski Pass
Aug 23, 2015
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The timing of the revival of this thread has coincided with me researching solutions for my Japan trip. Back in the day I used to max out to din settings on my bindings. On deep days I would add fluro powder ribbons. Attached to the bindings and tape stuffed up under the gaiter of my ski pants. I don’t recall it being a huge issue as after the initial gondola ride to get up the mountain I never really took my skis off again. I still have my original ribbons. Must’ve 30+ years old now. I really like the idea of putting a key ring loop on the binding and a light weight karabiner on the end of the ribbon. Has anyone tried the powder cords that sit in a pouch and strap to your boot? I was thinking of this type of product. How much of a PITA are they if putting boots in walk mode?
i skiied for about a week with the orange ones you see in the first picture.
they're nylon-cloth-ish, but didn't absorb any water and become icy.
and they have a little rubber slidey toggle and a loop at the end that means you can loop it over a break arm, then slide the toggle down to lock it. you can make it out in the pic. i think its a pretty good solution rather than metal clips or key rings that rattle or could slide off if the ribbon becomes loose.
they come with an optional calf pouch thingo. but i didn't buy the added extras. instead i then pull the end up through my pants, and out my waist. the waistband and my belt hold it in place and my tests suggested that it'd have no problems zipping out if i lost a ski. i wonder if i they would have pulled my pants down instead some day ;P

i never lost a ski with them, its not like i lose them often, but i considered that every time ive lost skis in Japan theyve run for 10-20m under the surface of the snow, off on some curve in some unexplained direction. on one occasion they were 100m away!
those orange ribbons are only like 4-5m long. otherwise theyd be too much to of a fuss to handle.
having to take skiis off once or twice was ok, but they were a pain to take off all the time for slackcountry skiing from the gondola when lapping the out of bounds pow accessed there.

every year i see one or two guys getting around with the keyrings and pouches. the pouches seem very high up on the calf. above the boot even. perhaps this is to allow for setting walk mode/accessing the buckles/etc.
they look like the types of dudes that will go to extreme efforts to avoid paying for anything and instead use a good home made solution weather its pretty or not and spend more than a commercial product in buying parts in the end anyway. you know who you are :p i should ask them how well they work tho.
 

Spence

One of Us
Ski Pass
Mar 16, 2019
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Sydney
i wonder if i they would have pulled my pants down instead some day ;P

Gold. That would then be a ‘stacking and dacking’. Adding a bit of humiliation to the inconvenience of a deep snow wipe out is bound to keep one humble :(
I’ll look into the break attachment method. Thanks.
 
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skifree

A disciple of the blessed avi giraffe
Moderator
Ski Pass
Jul 13, 1998
33,781
35,412
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Middle Oz
I have the ReqSki and can recomend taking the batteries out for storage (mostly to avoid them going flat while in store) and a spare set with you when you travel. The battery sizes are not that uncommon until you are looking for them.

The ski part takes 389s and the seeker takes 2032s.
 

skifree

A disciple of the blessed avi giraffe
Moderator
Ski Pass
Jul 13, 1998
33,781
35,412
1,063
Middle Oz
Just looking at the ResQSki site for another reason and note their advice on the batteries is;

The handheld takes one CR2032 battery. The tags take two LR54 batteries each.

I think I had found Energizer 389s were an equivalent to the LR54 after a bit of web searching for a battery I could get in Jindy.
 

Any

One of Us
Ski Pass
Aug 23, 2015
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I have the ReqSki and can recomend taking the batteries out for storage (mostly to avoid them going flat while in store) and a spare set with you when you travel. The battery sizes are not that uncommon until you are looking for them.

The ski part takes 389s and the seeker takes 2032s.
doh. i bet i didnt take mine out. theyre switched off at least i hope.

seems like theres about 20 different labeling schemes for batteries. and yeah LR54 is the same as 1130 series batteries.

must avoid alkaline batteries, they go flat within a day or two because of the cold.
try to avoid silver oxide batteries, they go flat within weeks.
recommend lithium batteries, that'll last more than the whole season (especially if you turn them off every day).

lithium CR1130/1131/1132's are hard to find, but worth it imo.

recommend also purchasing batteries from someone who has a high turnover of them. otherwise they could be sitting on the shelf for months, and these small batteries have a surprisingly short shelf life.
 
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Michal12

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World's first electronic ski lock, product launch on Kickstarter coming soon. Check the website pealock.com
 

skifree

A disciple of the blessed avi giraffe
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Jul 13, 1998
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2 small magnets came with the fixing screws for my resqski kits and I've never found out where to put them or what to do with them.

An email to resqski has not generated any response from that quarter.

Anyone worked where to put or what to do with the little magnets?
 

Any

One of Us
Ski Pass
Aug 23, 2015
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2 small magnets came with the fixing screws for my resqski kits and I've never found out where to put them or what to do with them.

An email to resqski has not generated any response from that quarter.

Anyone worked where to put or what to do with the little magnets?
got a pic?

do they work? does it turn on when you move to on position. red light should flash once.

i believe they detect on or off position with magnets. maybe they go inside somewhere or into the base plate somewhere.
i never had to do anything with magents tho. a paper strip to pull out to activate the batteries, some sticky labels 1 or 2, i didn't use screws just used the doublesided tape (i added superglue to both sides tho), stick to ski, and done.
 

skifree

A disciple of the blessed avi giraffe
Moderator
Ski Pass
Jul 13, 1998
33,781
35,412
1,063
Middle Oz
got a pic?

do they work? does it turn on when you move to on position. red light should flash once.

i believe they detect on or off position with magnets. maybe they go inside somewhere or into the base plate somewhere.
i never had to do anything with magents tho. a paper strip to pull out to activate the batteries, some sticky labels 1 or 2, i didn't use screws just used the doublesided tape (i added superglue to both sides tho), stick to ski, and done.

No pics, sorry I left the loose bits at home. It appears to work, I get red lights when twisted to the ON position and the seeker seems to be able to find them.

I suppose I'm still curious as to what the magnets about, they are not mentioned in the instructions or on the website that I could find.
 

Any

One of Us
Ski Pass
Aug 23, 2015
1,474
3,037
363
oz/japan/usa
No pics, sorry I left the loose bits at home. It appears to work, I get red lights when twisted to the ON position and the seeker seems to be able to find them.

I suppose I'm still curious as to what the magnets about, they are not mentioned in the instructions or on the website that I could find.
i guess all is ok then

just checked my packaging, no magnets leftover or anything.

it is the weekend, and a huge timezone difference. i guess youll just have to wait for them to get back to you.
 
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skifree

A disciple of the blessed avi giraffe
Moderator
Ski Pass
Jul 13, 1998
33,781
35,412
1,063
Middle Oz
i guess all is ok then

just checked my packaging, no magnets leftover or anything.

it is the weekend, and a huge timezone difference. i guess youll just have to wait for them to get back to you.
I emailed months ago, was reminded of the issue checking thu unanswered email.
 
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