Advice needed Mounting snowboards to drywall

Interruptedbyfireworks

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I’ve seen other threads on similar things before, but still can’t quite figure it out :confused:

I want to mount my two snowboards vertically to the drywall in my garage. Kind of like so:
E7CD1D7B-1137-444E-885A-DB2D6AA20A5E.jpeg

My main confusion is - the studs are too far apart / not the right distance for mounting the screws, so they’d have to go straight into drywall. I’m nervous about mounting load bearing screws into drywall.

So how do drywall anchors work? Are there particular kinds that are better than others? Would they safely hold my boards without being in the stud?

My other option is to drill a piece of wood to the wall using the studs, and then drill the mounts to the wood instead of the drywall.

I haven’t looked into which particular type of mount thing to get yet either so if anyone has any recommendations of good ones that don’t get torn apart straight away by the board edges that would be great too!
 

nfip

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Best to screw fix a horizontal flat piece of timber to the wall studs.
Say 110mm x 18mm (pre-primed straight off the shelf at you know where )
Then fix the mounts onto the timber.
Then put another piece of timber same size directly below at bottom of the boards.
that way the boards will sit straight and not bang up the plasterboard (drywall) .
I know a bloke that can do it for you but he's expensive, slow and rough.
 
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Sage O

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I just ordered one of these, brackets slide so can be aligned with the stud.

6076CF93-1691-4461-93C2-F3F1E94883EA.png

C39E85E1-B27F-40A2-93F9-8CE519D326B8.png
 

nfip

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I'm hanging a bike.
Purely off screw mounts.
Metal versions of screw in.
Yoi can get the Ramset ones at Bunnings. I can assure you that 2 can safely secure 50 kg .

Yep. will work bro's.
the ramset gear is the bomb . 100%
but.
it's only as good as the 'board that it is fixed into. ;)
and the plasterboard, aka gyprock, aka (on them mf reno shows) drywall is not entirely so reliable.
dead load ( no movement) will be fine .
live load ( movement .... hanging and lifting etc ) .....
life expectancy decreases.
IMO.
 

Interruptedbyfireworks

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Those ramset ones look hardcore! Would I need to know how thick my drywall is for those? And can you stuff up the installation if you are a numpty? Otherwise I might be better off going with the wooden bracket option if that’s harder to screw up (pun intended). I got a cordless drill for my birthday which I’m excited to use!
 

Interruptedbyfireworks

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Yep. will work bro's.
the ramset gear is the bomb . 100%
but.
it's only as good as the 'board that it is fixed into. ;)
and the plasterboard, aka gyprock, aka (on them mf reno shows) drywall is not entirely so reliable.
dead load ( no movement) will be fine .
live load ( movement .... hanging and lifting etc ) .....
life expectancy decreases.
IMO.
Soooooo no more earthquakes then, right?! LOL
 
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nfip

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Those ramset ones look hardcore! Would I need to know how thick my drywall is for those? And can you stuff up the installation if you are a numpty? Otherwise I might be better off going with the wooden bracket option if that’s harder to screw up (pun intended). I got a cordless drill for my birthday which I’m excited to use!
nah.
the ramset ones are very user friendly.
your board will be 10mm (unless there's some brace ply behind but you'll know pretty quick - dont panic btw)
I do recommend pre-drill a hole into the gyprock before you screw those bad boys in.
just to get it started and in the right place or they will dive around a bit and make a mess.
and don't over tighten them into the gyprock.
let them go in snug , but don' t get carried away .
 

Mr. Mook

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Since the boards are not all that heavy, any decent wall anchor should hold them ok.

I have had success using these at work to hold up such things as metal frame shelves and light steel bag racks for the students school bags to hang from.

Just make sure the screws you use are long enough to reach the far end of the toggle


1633861440855.png
 

Belly

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This is a circa 15kg (+) vintage mal hanging with surfboard designed brackets and standard type screws that came with it. We spent much time finding the timber brackets.
1633897830028.jpg
In the far corner my leave project will be installing a self made surfboard rack. A simple design with a horizontal timber strip and then thick dow type round timber protruding outwards say 21 inches out, diameter of an inch or so. Won't need to hold much weight as the boards will be grounded on a rubber pad. Therefore the weight forces will be more lateral lean than vertical gravity pull. My snowboards are bagged in the shed but will be able to be used in this design during winter.

Didn't research all the various Bunnings products, my FIL is quite the handyman, but I'm with nfip, mogul et al, of being very cautious with hanging loads from plasterboard unless you're certain of your anchor. So I'm not really adding anything new ha ha :)
 

nfip

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Wouldn't use these at all, they are useless and hold very little weight.

These are the only things to use:
1633849937616.png
I've held up everything from brackets for Hardwood kitchen shelves to fire extinguishers and god knows what else , for the past ....... 30 years plus (ouch !).
One thing I have learned.
There are 10 ways to do a job and 8 of them will be right. ;)
 
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nfip

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piolet

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Plasterboard fixings are stronger than you'd expect but as mentioned, mostly good for static load. Frequent use or getting bumped can make the fitting loose or bust the board - like a toddler being a toddler.

Case in point: Im halfway through a plaster repair from a kid hanging onto a shelf mounted into plasterboard. Final touch ups happening next but bet your ass the shelf will mounted back onto the studs LOL
 

skinavy

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Plasterboard fixings are stronger than you'd expect but as mentioned, mostly good for static load. Frequent use or getting bumped can make the fitting loose or bust the board - like a toddler being a toddler.

Case in point: Im halfway through a plaster repair from a kid hanging onto a shelf mounted into plasterboard. Final touch ups happening next but bet your ass the shelf will mounted back onto the studs LOL
Wait till your kids want roller skates and then skate inside (because Dad has no idea what he is talking about and we would never run into walls). Apparently I have a new child at home called "I didn't do it" who skates inside and has twice now put a perfect skate stopper size hole in the wall just above the skirting.
 

Interruptedbyfireworks

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Plasterboard fixings are stronger than you'd expect but as mentioned, mostly good for static load. Frequent use or getting bumped can make the fitting loose or bust the board - like a toddler being a toddler.

Case in point: Im halfway through a plaster repair from a kid hanging onto a shelf mounted into plasterboard. Final touch ups happening next but bet your ass the shelf will mounted back onto the studs LOL
Hmmm this seems like a good reason to not rely upon them then, considering the new addition we will soon have! Plus I’m super clumsy and knock the bikes at least once a week, I’m sure the boards will suffer a similar fate
 
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VSG

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Wait till your kids want roller skates and then skate inside (because Dad has no idea what he is talking about and we would never run into walls). Apparently I have a new child at home called "I didn't do it" who skates inside and has twice now put a perfect skate stopper size hole in the wall just above the skirting.
A length of 150mm wide, 25mm thick board glued to the dry wall, about 40cm off the ground will prevent a lot of pain, of things being driven into and breaking the drywall. In the case of skateboards/rollerskates/blades ... just ban em. :D
 

Richard

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Wouldn't use these at all, they are useless and hold very little weight.

These are the only things to use:
1633849937616.png

With over 20 years of experience in renovating a 100 year old Cal Bungalow, and two sons who manage to mince everything. I can categorically confirm that these are the strongest of all the plasterboard/drywall fixtures going.

Requires one of these;

CC2622D1-E04F-475E-8819-0343D8845B8E.jpeg

Note: Very heavy items will cause the plasterboard to bow over time - depends on angle of attack re: leverage against the fixture.

Two anchors will hold one snowboard just fine and I would assume the boards running flat down the wall won't create much 'pull out' leverage against the anchors.
 

Richard

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these are the go -to for hanging anything directly into plasterboard.
they come in metal also , which are for heavier items.
1633844221447.png

I use these all the time - but only for hanging framed paintings. So long as the load direction is directly down the plane of the wall they are fine and can handle the weight specified. Any 'pull leverage' at tangent to the wall and they will eventually fail (just like any screw in crumbling plasterboard). It's also important to get a super clean bite into the plasterboard by punching the spear end like a nail and then turning slowly to let the thread do it's work - and never overturn once head is flush with board.
 

Interruptedbyfireworks

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Hi, it's me again, someone who has finally learned the meaning of "measure twice, cut once".

I have some 20mm thick and 800m long wood, but from googling and using my shitty stud finder my studs appear to be 450mm apart. At first I thought I could just attach the wood to two studs (like the bottom red bit of wood in figure B) but then realised the screw would probably scratch my boards (unless it was countersunk which seems beyond my skill level since I don't have a countersink drill bit?).

So I either need to:

(A) Attach the wood (red) to a single stud (blue) in the centre - will the shear force be too much for this?

(B) Attach the wood to a noggin (blue) - are they load bearing like studs?

(C) Get some longer wood

Thoughts?

Snowboard rack.jpg
 
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