Victorian Alps Mt Nelse from Falls

Discussion in 'Backcountry Trip Reports' started by Chaeron, Jul 3, 2018.

  1. Chaeron

    Chaeron One of Us
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    Arthur (11) and Julian (16) got their first taste of overnight BC skiing on a three day outing from Windy Corner through to Mt Nelse - Sunday through Tuesday.

    Thanks to @mr for the kids patterned base skis and the Karhu Guides - put to good use.

    3 Bluebird days. Day 1 we had the 12 cm top up on a 60cm base from Friday and Saurday to give us optimal conditions for the way out. We took it slowly out to Edmondson hut via Heathy Spur.

    Jules and I enjoyed The Karhu Guides/ Madshus Annums - patterned bases combined with tech bindings on rolling hills - easy transitions and an easy downhill.

    Arthur had to get used to skinny telemark pattern bases with a full back pack so it was challenging for him, but nothing like a quick learning curve. We used the Norwegian coaching method - put someone high on a steep slope and give them a push....

    Day 2 we bummed around the hut and took a quick trip up Mount Nelse - the snowdrift means lots of soft snow in sheltered areas, especially in the trees, and chopped up boilerplate where the wind had stripped the snow in the exposed areas.

    Day 3 saw a fast return to Windy Corner - the boys took 3 hours to cover what took them double the time only 2 days before, even with less forgiving snow - finding one’s snow legs and a bit of confidence having had the time to improve technique makes all the difference.

    Met Kiwi Simon Evans at Edmondson’s hut. Simon is a Melbourne-based snow/ surf kiter and ex Big Mountain skier. He’s spending some extended time out on the High Plains on a special venture raising awareness of mental health issues - check out his blog here if you want: https://simonsblog.kiwi/


    Mt Mackay & Feathertop in the distance.


    Heading up Heathy Spur from Edmondson’s.


    Not all snow is an easy ski.... the weekend’s forecast 0.5 m of fresh will add nicely to this base though.



    Arthur at the Nelse beacon - heading down Nelse boilerplate is a good beginner’s lesson for tele.

    Looking at Nelse like this one doesn’t realise it’s the third highest Vic mountain after Bogong and Feathertop (higher than Hotham or Mackay)
     

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    #1 Chaeron, Jul 3, 2018
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2018
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  2. Xplora

    Xplora One of Us

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    There is a point on Spione Kopje just west of Nelse that is higher but it does not have an official name. Probably doesn't count under the definition of a peak though. I have heard it called Maisie's knoll which I thought was fitting considering all the conservation work she did in the area many years ago.

    Another great Dad spending quality time and know doubt the kids benefited from some expert tuition. Still some hope for us old farts but I wish had started at 11. I am sure the kids will be hooked now. Well done.
     
  3. teleunc

    teleunc Hard Yards

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    Mt Hunpvic ( highest unnamed peak in vic)
     
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  4. mr

    mr Part of the Furniture
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    @skifree has named it mt nice. Cause it is.
     
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  5. Chaeron

    Chaeron One of Us
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  6. Chaeron

    Chaeron One of Us
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    https://www.ski.com.au/xf/threads/bogong-high-plains-dec-2017-5-day-trek.80352/#post-3483559

    Thx @Xplora - As in your post referenced above Maisie’s Knoll / mt Hunpvic deserves it’s moment of glory.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maisie_Carr

    http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/carr-stella-grace-maisie-201:

    “Mrs Carr made major contributions in no fewer than four fields of Australian plant science.

    In the 1940s she was seconded from the University of Melbourne to the Victorian Soil Conservation Authority to study soil erosion in the Victorian Alps. She covered vast territories on horseback and became uniquely expert on the history and ecology of alpine Australia.

    The new quantitative methods which she introduced to monitor vegetational changes had lasting influence on the conduct and teaching of ecology, and her work on the alpine vegetation was classic.

    Her most enduring memorial from those five years of fieldwork is to the great benefit of all who nowadays visit the Alps. She worked so harmoniously with the cattlemen of the High Plains that she was able to introduce measures to combat over-grazing — no mean feat, in view of their century old traditions!

    She was proud of having been attached to a Royal Commission which led to the proclamation of a crucial Soil Conservation and Land Utilization Act in 1949. Glowing tributes to Maisie's conservation efforts feature in the book The Alps at the Crossroads and in the late Sir Keith Hancock's book Discovering Monaro.

    At her request the State Electricity Authority enclosed a large plot of land at Rocky Valley, near Falls Creek, where the rich vegetation which grew up under her protection is now a tourist attraction.”

    At the risk of going off topic -Maisie could have corraled the wild brumby lovers...
     
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