Question Omni Tech vs Gore-tex

Gabriel

First Runs
Apr 18, 2014
5
0
1
looking for a jacket & pants for kind of cold weather ( -20 degree )
by doing some research most of the brand is using Gore-Tex , and columbia is using Omni tech ,
anyone have try those two type of jacket and suggest which is will be better in terms of warm ??
thanks,
 

Legs Akimbo

Grumblebum
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Mar 3, 1999
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Both are membranes and add nothing to warmth. They are waterproof/breathable membranes.

What you have to worry about is insulation. At those temperatures there is nothing that outperforms down.
 

Ziggy

A Local
Aug 24, 2003
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Goretex doesn't actually 'breathe' and for that reason it will feel warmer.

If breathability is important then consider garments with an eVent membrane.

If it's still and you're working physically, you don't need much insulation at -20. If however you're stuck eg on a lift chair in the wind you do. You're better off thinking about layering.
 

BoofHead

One of Us
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Aug 8, 2007
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I used a Columbia shell (omnitech) in Japan this year. First time I have layered rather than use an insulated jacket. I've wanted a good Goretex shell for ages but can't justify the expense. I scored the Columbia shell for $80 brand new at a MountainDesigns discount outlet. I can't recall what the temps were but I was never cold. I used the shell with a polar fleece mid layer and a merino base layer. I also carried a lightweight jumper in my pack just in case.
If money is not an issue, I personally would go for the goretex but if you are just banging around a resort you might be overthinking it.

Do a search- goretex v omnitech. There is a lot of info available
 

Sandy

Dark Sith Lord of the Pool Room
Moderator
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Goretex doesn't actually 'breathe' and for that reason it will feel warmer.

If breathability is important then consider garments with an eVent membrane.

If it's still and you're working physically, you don't need much insulation at -20. If however you're stuck eg on a lift chair in the wind you do. You're better off thinking about layering.

What do you mean by "Goretex doesn't actually 'breathe' ". You can see Goretex waterproof/breathability specs for garments, such as 20,000mm/10,000g. Goretex DOES breath and you can prove it!!!!!!

If you have a very thin Goretex shell, boil some water and pour into a cup. Put the Goretex garment over the cup and you will actually see the water vapour passing through the garment. Goretex does breath.
 
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Sandy

Dark Sith Lord of the Pool Room
Moderator
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Both are membranes and add nothing to warmth. They are waterproof/breathable membranes.

What you have to worry about is insulation. At those temperatures there is nothing that outperforms down.
^^ This

I live in Japan, I have two jackets:
- Gore windstopper shell jacket, that breaths, but blocks wind (it's thin but provides a block to the wind) then I layer underneath.
- Goretex shell jacket. Provides waterproof/breathability.

I use the windstopper about 85% of the time, because it's not often wet enough to switch to the goretex..
 

Annabuzzy

That's 'ma Lord Buzzy to you
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I reckon go goretex. A good goretex jacket will last at least a decade.

One thing about good Goretex is the elimination of water vapour within the jacket as you exercise. The more clammy you get inside the colder you will get. A good quality jacket helps in that aspect of temperature regulation.

Mainly though I say go Goretex because the initially higher up front investment will pay off over at least a decade of quality usage.
 

skichanger

A Local
Jan 1, 2012
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I have an old Katmandu goretex jacket - I think I bought it in 2004. It is worn out in the sense that it has holes where the clips on the side at the bottom have rubbed - when you get on chairs - and the glue has failed on the velcro tabs at the wrists. Otherwise it is the same as when I bought it. I would buy another but they don't make that or similar models anymore. I keep going back to it, rather than the newer jackets I have, because it ticks all the important boxes. Its one failing is that the outside pockets let water in. It has always done this so I learnt not to put stuff in those pockets on wet days.

I also have a paddy pallin shell I bought in 1984. It has delaminated but still keeps you dry. The outside gets wet and heavy if you are out in rain. Otherwise it is fine.I wear it if I need to garden or dig trenches in the rain because I don't care if I wreck it.
 

Red_switch

Old n' Crusty
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Gore-tex has a bit of a reputation for delaminating with prolonged use at very low temperatures, e.g. it's shit in Antarctica (before anyone says you don't need waterproof in Antarctica, that's also bs, especially when it comes to pants/salopettes). eVent supposedly works better, and Gelanots performs very well in extreme temperatures (hence Earth Sea Sky use it for Antarctica New Zealand kit).
 

Time

Hard Yards
Aug 18, 2008
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Gore-tex has a bit of a reputation for delaminating with prolonged use at very low temperatures, e.g. it's shit in Antarctica (before anyone says you don't need waterproof in Antarctica, that's also bs, especially when it comes to pants/salopettes). eVent supposedly works better, and Gelanots performs very well in extreme temperatures (hence Earth Sea Sky use it for Antarctica New Zealand kit).

Spend a bit of time down south eh?
 
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zantac_2

Hard Yards
May 19, 2013
12
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for warmth, it's all about insulation. i personally prefer synthetics. arc'teryx coreloft is excellent in my opinion.
 

Ziggy

A Local
Aug 24, 2003
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If you have a very thin Goretex shell, boil some water and pour into a cup. Put the Goretex garment over the cup and you will actually see the water vapour passing through the garment. Goretex does breath.

Yeah; operative words being 'thin' and 'boil'. In the field you are typically looking at a 3 layer garment and much lower pressure differences between the inside of the garment and the outside.

It doesn't puff air in and out; under limited circumstances it will allow moisture vapour to pass through. Other fabrics such as eVent and Neoshell move more moisture vapour and are a better choice for active users than std Gore-tex. The new Gore-tex Pro is getting there though.

If the original poster is going to use any shell with a membrane over insulating garments MVT drops further of course.
 
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