Opinions/ advice regarding a season in Canada 18/19

Discussion in 'Canada' started by Emmalie, Jun 24, 2018.

  1. Emmalie

    Emmalie First Runs

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    Hi all!

    I'm going to spend a few months (mid December - April ideally) in Canada over the 18/19 season but I'm a bit in over my head with so many options/ possibilities for how to go about it all.

    For a bit of background, I work remotely here in Aus and my boss has agreed to me doing this same work for a few months overseas while I'm in Canada (what a dream, right?). I plan on saving enough to show I can support myself for the duration of my trip, but will be still earning some income (in Aus dollars, into an Aus bank account, paying tax in Aus and only working for Aus clients). I plan on getting a letter from my boss as a reference for entering the country, plus evidence of family etc back home to come back to. I'm a bit concerned that they will be under the impression that I plan on working in Canada due to the length of the trip, does anyone have any experience with situations like this? Do you think it's essential for me to have return flights under my belt to be let into the country? (I will potentially be travelling to Europe before coming home so would like to avoid getting return flights if possible).

    Secondly, I'm having trouble deciding which resort to go with. I'm thinking one of the resorts in BC and some of the deciding factors that come to mind are:
    - Affordable rent (with internet access) / lift passes for someone who isn't working in the area (I've heard it can be hard to find accommodation as a non-local and someone who doesn't have staff housing in some resorts),
    - Good access to the slopes from home (shuttle busses, public transport etc, or alternatively, would buying a car for the season be worth it?),
    - Good social scene without being to wild - I've heard Whistler is full of Aussies and partying, which sounds great for maybe a week away while I'm there but not really what I'm looking for for the entire trip. At the same time I don't want to be the only person in their mid 20s in the area surrounded by families.
    - Great runs for skiers.

    Apologies for the wall of text, really appreciate any advice / thoughts any one can give!
    Cheers.
     
  2. BenWhite

    BenWhite Hard Yards

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    I have done this multiple times for 4-5 months and never been asked for proof of either funds or onward flight. But that said I did still have the information handy just in case I needed it. I would say having an onward ticket may be helpful.

    In terms of resorts, lots of the ones I have been to have a large Aussie presence. Big White, Silver Star, Whistler, Revelstoke... But they are all still good fun. Big white has the largest (?) ski in/out village in North America so there is still nightlife as opposed to somewhere like silver star where its much smaller village wise (but still a couple of bars). Revelstoke is great and a bit more hardcore. Only a 10 min bus ride from the resort and I didnt find it too hard to fine cheap accom for 4 weeks I was there. Red, Whitewater, and Fernie all get great reviews form everyone but apparently somewhat quieter on the nightlife side and more remote (so maybe not so many Aussis/Kiwis).
     
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  3. Wardy

    Wardy One of Us

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    For the trip profile you describe, I wouldn't choose: Whistler, Big White, Silver Star or Sun Peaks.
    I would choose: Fernie, Revelstoke, Nelson or Rossland
     
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  4. oldgeezer

    oldgeezer Addicted

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    Canada might be a bit more relaxed than the USA or Japan where I was on a one way ticket in each case (with onward tickets on different airlines) but could not even check in on my flights departing Australia until Iy produced evidence of my ticket for leaving the country. Didn't have to be return, e.g. going to Japan on J* the flight out was on AC to Vancouver and going to USA the flight in was CathayPacific but out on ANA to Japan. Canada now requires Advance Passenger Information so chances are the same process is applied at check-in. Going for more than 90 days means you would not be utilising their eTA but be looking at a different class of visa issued by the consulate where this and the monetary angle would be clarified as part of that process.
     
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  5. The Plowking

    The Plowking Part of the Furniture
    Ski Pass - Gold

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    I second the quoted information.
    Also add Golden/Kicking Horse to above list.
    And to the op, FYI...
    Town is Nelson/ hill is Whitewater
    Town is Rossland/ Hill is Red mountain


    And Fernies fernie
    Revelstokes revelstoke

    I'd definitely go on a return ticket.
     
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  6. The Plowking

    The Plowking Part of the Furniture
    Ski Pass - Gold

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  7. sly_karma

    sly_karma Part of the Furniture
    Ski Pass - Gold

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    The good news is that online remote work is not considered to be working in Canada. For the purposes of immigration/entry to Canada, work is defined as "an activity for which wages are paid or commission is earned, or that competes directly with activities of Canadian citizens or permanent residents in the Canadian labour market." The second phrase is your out, since your work in Australia has no impact on the Canadian labour market. Better yet, the government also lists activities that are not considered to be work, and one of them is "long distance (by telephone or Internet) work done by a temporary resident whose employer is outside Canada and who is remunerated from outside Canada." More information here:
    https://www.canada.ca/en/immigratio...y-residents/foreign-workers/what-is-work.html

    The bad news is that Canadian entry ports are staffed by human beings, with all their imperfections and quirks. Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) has the responsibility of deciding who does and does not enter the country, along with watching for terrorism, weapons, drugs, dangerous substances, agricultural and biological hazards, kidnapped children, refugees, asylum seekers, illegal workers, stolen vehicles. They are expected to levy and collect taxes on behalf of the federal and provincial governments. Long story short, they have an enormous range of responsibilities and a very short time in which to assess each person that comes before them. The issue of work is always a very touchy one with immigration officials, and they may not get it right 100% of the time. It's important to always answer truthfully to border officials, but equally important to only answer the questions asked. Even though you're working for Australian clients, being paid in Australian funds into an Australian bank, I'd still recommend you don't volunteer this information. When asked the purpose of your visit, the answer is "tourism", or "personal" - definitely do not answer "business". And this is the truth; if you had no interest in tourism you would not be coming to Canada, nor do you need to be in Canada to do your work. You'll be asked how long you intend to stay (the normal limit is 6 months); having an onward flight booking would help in this regard. You'll probably be asked where you plan to visit, "ski resorts in BC" is a good answer.

    At this point you might be asked directly if you intend to work in Canada. You may truthfully answer "no". If asked how you intend to support yourself during the time of your stay, you can state that you will continue to work remotely for your Australian employer. You'll definitely want to have supporting documentation for this, such as the letter from your employer that you mentioned. You could also have the link to the Citizenship Canada website on your phone, but you'd have to be very delicate about using it. Showing an official they have incorrectly interpreted the law - especially in front of their colleagues - is not the fast track into Canada.

    Do some more reading and have your approach thought out. You're not doing anything illegal, but you never know who you'll be dealing with until the moment you step up to the desk in the immigration hall.
     
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  8. Sbooker

    Sbooker Hard Yards

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    For clarification Nelson and Rossland are pretty close so if you stay in one the odd trip to the other is doable.
     
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  9. Emmalie

    Emmalie First Runs

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    Really appreciate this information @sly_karma!
     
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  10. Crystal

    Crystal Sand skier extraordinaire
    Moderator Ski Pass - Gold

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    be careful, he will send you an invoice ;)
     
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  11. Emmalie

    Emmalie First Runs

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    Thanks everyone for your information and advice! 99% sure I'm gonna go with Fernie. Now to find somewhere to live! Let me know if anyone has any more tips or insider info about the area.
     
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  12. Wardy

    Wardy One of Us

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    Good choice. 'The Valley Social' for coffee and hang outs