1. There's more to this forum than meets the eye!

    We have a vibrant community here conversing about all sorts of non-snow topics such as music, sport, politics and technology. Simply register to reveal all our Après topics or continue browsing and reading as a guest.

    NOTE: This notice may be closed.

    Dismiss Notice

Prior Splitboard Review

Discussion in 'Backcountry' started by Belly, Aug 2, 2005.

  1. Belly

    Belly A Local Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2003
    Messages:
    9,104
    Likes Received:
    4,818
    Location:
    Monaro
    I’m a bit bored at work also so I thought now that I have a few days of riding under my belt I would post a review of my (was) new Prior Splitboard

    http://www.priorsnowboards.com/boards_splitboard.php

    I had decided on the Prior after much research on http://www.splitboard.com/
    The key factor being that the Prior appeared to have better edge in firm / corn snow than the Voile (although they have now released a stiffer board called Mountain Gun) but it still went well in the pow. The Prior Khyber split is their more full on pow board, my shape is the standard MFR. I did consider a Never Summer but the wait for the board appeared longer and they appeared more costly than the Priors.

    The Prior also has a reputation for being bombproof, I can attest to this with some horrible noises emanating due to our marginal conditions and me perfecting my splitting technique, however upon inspection yes there were some reasonable scratches but with similar treatment a lesser board would show a gouge rather than a scratch.

    So the board I settled on was the 165cm (I’m around 189cm and 90kg).

    I did not consider a Burton as I did not like the reviews of the interface, interestingly Burton are ditching their design in favour of the Voile interface.

    Climbing
    Given the marginal conditions I have taken the split out on already, the conditions would have to be extremely marginal and/or the terrain absolutely suited to snowshoes for me to get back on to the shoes. Skinning rocks and as a 100% boarder the day I spent at Lake Mountain with the +1 last year XC skiing has also helped enormously. The ability to cover ground for less effort is way ahead of shoe’ing.

    The fat Voile Tractor Skins climb amazingly, 2 of the steeper ascents were 1) straight up the west face of Stirling summit on windblown icy snow, probably around the 20 degree region, and 2) up the east face of Mt Wills in slush, probably around 25+ degrees, traction not a problem on either using a traversing type ascent pattern. But thank god for climbing bars.

    I did purchase the splitboard crampons, no need for these as yet but I’m sure they’ll be handy in the icy conditions of the bigger mountains. The ability for the crampon to be fixed (always in the snoe) or free (swinging with the binding) looks great.

    Riding
    Despite the extra weight (see below) of the board it rides really well and I’ve had no problems with manoeuvrability, however so far my turn have been more sweeping in nature, I’m yet to tackle any real steeps. Last week I built a little snow covered jib and the board was easy to place on the obstacle, jump, etc.

    But the greatest strength of the board was its straight tracking, so stable and fast, who needs turns [​IMG]

    Cons
    Weight, the main reason I purchased the split so was to eliminate the need of carrying a board with an o/n pack (and I really wanted to be more like you skiers [​IMG] ), but the extra hardware on the board does make it significantly heavier than a standard board. Last week I had to carry the board with an o/n pack and it did add to the weight significantly.

    All in all stoked with it. [​IMG]

    (Have some photo’s but can’t get them up til the weekend. I’m happy to point anyone in the right direction if their interested and no I don’t have a personal interest. Yet anyway.)
     
    #1 Belly, Aug 2, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 14, 2013
  2. Raury

    Raury Endless Winter Endless Winter

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2000
    Messages:
    24,679
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Adelaide and Naracoorte
    Good review Belly. :thumbs:

    Would you use it in a resort, or stick to a one piece for that?

    I would have thought you might feel the board flex down the centreline. Do you notice this, or does all teh hardware stop this?
     
  3. Belly

    Belly A Local Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2003
    Messages:
    9,104
    Likes Received:
    4,818
    Location:
    Monaro
    You'd only use it in the resort if you were linking frontcountry/backcountry turns, i.e. Golder Point you could shave some serious time from bootpacking, or same with the Paralyser at Perisher, as 2 examples.

    I should have added that currently the 'transitions' take me 4 to 5 minutes, should be able to get this down to about 2 minutes with more practise.

    Both flex types (your standard flex and the twisting type flex) at this stage appear fine, although I'm sure a super steep firm snow type descent may show that the board the isn't quite as responsive as the one piece. There would have to be some trade-off but it seems like they've got the technology so that its negligible.
     
  4. sidetrack

    sidetrack One of Us

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Messages:
    3,184
    Likes Received:
    542
    Location:
    Sunbury
    Nice review Belly. I have to ask though you just decided to give it a burl at Mt Wills, bloody long drive (assuming you are from Melb), its a nice place but it dosent offer a hell of a lot of terrain. Not having a go at you just curious. [​IMG]
     
    #4 sidetrack, Aug 2, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 11, 2013
  5. Raury

    Raury Endless Winter Endless Winter

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2000
    Messages:
    24,679
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Adelaide and Naracoorte
    Thanks.

    I await you report on using it on the steep then [​IMG]

    I'd also be interested to know how you go getting it waxed and tuned, though I suppose they'd just treat it as 2 pieces.

    Also interesting that they've taken the approach of just cutting the board straight down the middle, compared to the J shaped halves that I've seen on other (earlier?) boards.

    Did you try them as downhill skis? I take it you are using soft boots with this board?
     
    #5 Raury, Aug 2, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 11, 2013
  6. Belly

    Belly A Local Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2003
    Messages:
    9,104
    Likes Received:
    4,818
    Location:
    Monaro
    Mt Wills - so we could take the dogs snow camping. I reckon the terrain is great but it does need a lot of snow.

    I snow ploughed down some gentle downhill sections but because the 'skis' are so fat and your in soft boots/bindings you can't really ski/telemark with them.

    A lot of the o/s guys use a hardboot type set up but I'm happy with the soft boots so far.
     
  7. janus

    janus One of Us

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2002
    Messages:
    6,024
    Likes Received:
    10
    Does anyone in Jindy hire out split boards + skins?
     
  8. BrumbyJack

    BrumbyJack First Runs

    Joined:
    May 10, 2000
    Messages:
    19,669
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Jindabyne :-)
    Wilderness Sports used to sell them.... they probably still do. They may hire them???

    Have a look at Wilderness Sports
     
    #8 BrumbyJack, Aug 2, 2005
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 14, 2013
  9. Finn

    Finn First Runs

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2005
    Messages:
    193
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Melbourne
    When you guys say soft boot, does this mean you can use standard snowboarding boots and bindings? I couldn't figure this out, even after reading FAQs at splitboard.com
     
  10. Belly

    Belly A Local Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2003
    Messages:
    9,104
    Likes Received:
    4,818
    Location:
    Monaro
    ok, I'll do my best to explain the binding / hardware setup.

    You will note from the pictures on splitboard.com that there are fixed mountings for both the ride mode (these are called pucks) and ski mode (can't recall what they are called).

    The common piece's of hardware for both ride and ski mode is the slider plate and the pins. As the name suggests the slider plate is simply a long metal plate, this is what the bindings attach to on a permanent basis.

    You can attach either strap bindings (soft boots) or alpine bindings (some form of hard boot) to the slider plate.

    For ride mode slide the slider plate (with bindings attached) onto the pucks and fix the pin to hold the plate on the pucks. For ski mode remove the pin and the slider plate from the pucks and then attach using the pin to the ski mountings.
     
  11. Finn

    Finn First Runs

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2005
    Messages:
    193
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Thanks for that explanation, you say a soft boot wouldn't work well for downhill in ski mode. But I take it, it holds up ok on the ascent?