Restoring skis.

teckel

"I'm not a cat"
Ski Pass
Oct 16, 2004
50,770
25,145
1,515
Narbethong, Vic
www.mysticmountainsskihire.com.au
Look what appeared in my shop today.
A bloke from the next town wandered in and said if I didn't want them he was taking them to the tip.
So most reluctantly I agreed to take them off his hands
:love:

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teckel

"I'm not a cat"
Ski Pass
Oct 16, 2004
50,770
25,145
1,515
Narbethong, Vic
www.mysticmountainsskihire.com.au
Now, they've been on a wall and have nail and screw holes where they were attached to the wall. They also have paint where they must have been painted around when the wall was being painted. I'm going to remove that, obviously. Anyone know what I restore the timber with? Linseed oil?
Bases are totally shot. Metal edges are incomplete. But I don't think that matters.
Needless to say, they'll end up on the wall in my shop.
 

skinik

Hard Yards
Jul 12, 2010
56
148
83
Darug & Gadigal Country
Historically Informed Performance Skis! @teckel thats awesome! Good luck! Looking forward to hearing how this restoration/conservation project goes. My day job is teaching Historically Informed Performance string instruments (music of the 17th to early 20th centuries played on instruments of the period) - so would love to hear how you end up restoring these skis...What sort of wood are they? Linseed works on spruce, and often almond oil (very gentle on the wood). My inner nerd has always wanted a pair of the ones you see in the NFSA historic films about Charlotte Pass & Kiandra...
 

teckel

"I'm not a cat"
Ski Pass
Oct 16, 2004
50,770
25,145
1,515
Narbethong, Vic
www.mysticmountainsskihire.com.au
Historically Informed Performance Skis! @teckel thats awesome! Good luck! Looking forward to hearing how this restoration/conservation project goes. My day job is teaching Historically Informed Performance string instruments (music of the 17th to early 20th centuries played on instruments of the period) - so would love to hear how you end up restoring these skis...What sort of wood are they? Linseed works on spruce, and often almond oil (very gentle on the wood). My inner nerd has always wanted a pair of the ones you see in the NFSA historic films about Charlotte Pass & Kiandra...
I'm presuming they're hickory? But honestly, I have no idea.
Wow! What a wonderful job! (You're talking to an amateur cellist)
 

skinik

Hard Yards
Jul 12, 2010
56
148
83
Darug & Gadigal Country
I'm presuming they're hickory? But honestly, I have no idea.
Wow! What a wonderful job! (You're talking to an amateur cellist)
A cellist!Nice to meet you Hope you've been testing your cello case as a toboggan in Bond style getaways? Hickory wood- I wonder if linseed would work? I also wonder if (my inner nerd again) there is a 'historic treatise' ski repair manual somewhere in a ski archive? Thredbo's museum? NLA in Canberra? SMHA histories?.
 

TheFake

One of Us
Ski Pass
Aug 18, 2008
1,146
1,493
363
I'm presuming they're hickory? But honestly, I have no idea.
Wow! What a wonderful job! (You're talking to an amateur cellist)

Looks too dark to be hickory, but I guess it could be stained or just a misleading photo.

The finish you use really depends on the look you're after. If you want a high gloss finish it's hard to go past polyurethane or automotive clearcoat.

For less glossy you have the oils: boiled linseed, pure tung oil (pretty commonly used to protect knife handles) or something like orange oil (this stuff smells amazing.)
 
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Slowman

One of Us
Ski Pass
Apr 10, 2016
424
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They look great. With the restoration of old timber objects I think it's usually best to adopt a minimalist approach which preserves the marks of age (the "patina") rather than trying to get perfect surfaces. However having said that it helps to clean off any grime etc and to enrich the wood which has probably become very dry.

The general approach I adopt is to get some quite fine steel wool (like 000), mix up a bit of pure gum turpentine, boiled linseed oil and a small amount of methylated spirits, dab this on bits of the steel wool and gently rub the wood to clean away the grime. Some old bits of cloth are handy to wipe away any sludge which this generates. You can also probably clean the old bindings and edges and any residual leather straps the same way.

When finished you can then give them a bit of a final polish with some bee's wax.

Then hang your work up to admire and drink some celebratory beer.
 
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teckel

"I'm not a cat"
Ski Pass
Oct 16, 2004
50,770
25,145
1,515
Narbethong, Vic
www.mysticmountainsskihire.com.au
They look great. With the restoration of old timber objects I think it's usually best to adopt a minimalist approach which preserves the marks of age (the "patina") rather than trying to get perfect surfaces. However having said that it helps to clean off any grime etc and to enrich the wood which has probably become very dry.

The general approach I adopt is to get some quite fine steel wool (like 000), mix up a bit of pure gum turpentine, boiled linseed oil and a small amount of methylated spirits, dab this on bits of the steel wool and gently rub the wood to clean away the grime. Some old bits of cloth are handy to wipe away any sludge which this generates. You can also probably clean the old bindings and edges and any residual leather straps the same way.

When finished you can then give them a bit of a final polish with some bee's wax.

Then hang your work up to admire and drink some celebratory beer.
I like that approach :) I wonder if that would get rid of the paint? You can see a bit of the paint on the right ski in the third pic.
I certainly wouldn't be sanding them or varnishing them. No straps or cables to go with them.
Interestingly, one of the toe plates is the wrong way up. You can see that in the second pic. I'll rectify that, although I doubt it affected their performance in their day.
I may have some bits here to use if you wish to rebuild those bindings.

I'd be very interested. Although I don't plan to do it until the summer - too flat out atm.
 
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Slowman

One of Us
Ski Pass
Apr 10, 2016
424
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263
Perhaps you can use a plastic scraper first with some fine sandpaper to follow if need be to remove the bits of paint. Try to avoid pushing any particles of paint into the grain of the wood. Just rubbing fine steel wool onto the paint might inadvertently do this.
 
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teckel

"I'm not a cat"
Ski Pass
Oct 16, 2004
50,770
25,145
1,515
Narbethong, Vic
www.mysticmountainsskihire.com.au
Perhaps you can use a plastic scraper first with some fine sandpaper to follow if need be to remove the bits of paint. Try to avoid pushing any particles of paint into the grain of the wood. Just rubbing fine steel wool onto the paint might inadvertently do this.
Maybe try to soften the paint first? Not with a heat gun, but a hair dryer?
 
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Slowman

One of Us
Ski Pass
Apr 10, 2016
424
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I’ve not tried that but I have noticed that old paint on wood can be quite brittle and can come off in pieces with a bit of scraping pressure - which is a good thing. Heat might perhaps soften it and result in it clinging a bit more to the wood. Give both methods a try perhaps.
 

Skiain

One of Us
Sep 5, 2002
178
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sorry for the slow reply...been enjoying the Hotham goodness these past few weeks, on the lifts and on the trails.

I am not sure of the timber in your skis, but hickory is a good guess. Ash is also used in handmade skis.

I'd agree with @Slowman re the preparation, and personally favour an oil such as boiled linseed or lemon oil (or orange) to finish the skis. I think that keeping the scars and bruises of the skis, showcases their history. A light dab of tea-tree oil or eucalyptus has been good for removing gummy residue, and a light sanding afterwards. I have sanded some skis back to bare timber where there are patterns or vertical laminate to highlight, but avoided removing the physical marks. A polyurethane coating (or several) will provide a nice glossy finish and keep the colours of the timber. Many of the old timber skis were heavily varnished and over time it accumulates grit and discolours. Once cleaned (and sometimes lightly sanded) oils enhance the colours. I have not touched the bases other than to clean and de-rust the metal edges.

I look forward to seeing your finished project :)
 
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Billy_Buttons

Part of the Furniture
Ski Pass
Mar 25, 2011
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Slowman

One of Us
Ski Pass
Apr 10, 2016
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Ok they are not skis but I am pleased with today’s ….… still in lockdown so do a restoration job I’ve been putting off for a while. The poles belonged to an old family friend who use to ski at Charlottes Pass in the 1940’s. The snowshoes were purchased by my father from Paddy Pallin’s in the 1960’s.
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teckel

"I'm not a cat"
Ski Pass
Oct 16, 2004
50,770
25,145
1,515
Narbethong, Vic
www.mysticmountainsskihire.com.au
Ok they are not skis but I am pleased with today’s ….… still in lockdown so do a restoration job I’ve been putting off for a while. The poles belonged to an old family friend who use to ski at Charlottes Pass in the 1940’s. The snowshoes were purchased by my father from Paddy Pallin’s in the 1960’s.
7B7A39CB-AFC0-4173-BD73-F278C7C3CE98.jpeg
Stunning! Want to sell them? ;) LOL
 
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pegasusSki

One of Us
Ski Pass
Apr 18, 2015
1,669
1,841
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Ok they are not skis but I am pleased with today’s ….… still in lockdown so do a restoration job I’ve been putting off for a while. The poles belonged to an old family friend who use to ski at Charlottes Pass in the 1940’s. The snowshoes were purchased by my father from Paddy Pallin’s in the 1960’s.
7B7A39CB-AFC0-4173-BD73-F278C7C3CE98.jpeg
are we looking at the floor here, or the tennis rackets?
 

Legs Akimbo

Grumblebum
Ski Pass
Mar 3, 1999
68,355
43,658
1,563
Coastal suburban boonies.
Ok they are not skis but I am pleased with today’s ….… still in lockdown so do a restoration job I’ve been putting off for a while. The poles belonged to an old family friend who use to ski at Charlottes Pass in the 1940’s. The snowshoes were purchased by my father from Paddy Pallin’s in the 1960’s.
7B7A39CB-AFC0-4173-BD73-F278C7C3CE98.jpeg
Ooooh. A lifetime of twiddly bits. I expect an application of then old adage - 90% of a task takes 90% of the time. The last 10% takes the other 90%.
 
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