Ski Selection Help please

twisterella

First Runs
Oct 16, 2021
2
0
1
I haven't skied for a while and this winter (Southern Hemisphere) I really want to get back into skiing. There's some crazy deals going around at the moment and I'm looking at getting a pair (or Pairs) of skis to replace my old stock.
I'm 45 years old, my ski weight is usually around 90kgs and I'm 178cm (5'10"). Most of my skiing will be here in Australia with an occasional overseas (Northern Hemisphere - USA/Canada/ Japan) trips also planned.
I'm a high intermediate and are relatively confident over a fair bit of the mountain probably not as much in bumps or super steep terrain.
I really like short and long turns (want to carve properly) on piste but want to discover more off piste (all mountain) in the future.
As I want to do some lessons/ training camps I was originally looking at more front side skis but recently have been also looking at more all mountain skis.
I want a ski thats going to help me improve (I want to carve real well) and ski the whole mountain but I'm happy to get 2 pairs (one for frontside and one for all mountain) if need be.
Some of the skis I have looked at are :
Head V10 Super Shape and also the E-Rally and E-Titan
Volkl Deacon 74 Black and Deacon 84
Nordica Enforcer 88
Rossignol Experience Series
K2 Disruption series.

If anyone has experience with these skis or can pass on any advice or recommendations of what they think would be a good fit for me, id be really grateful.

Cheers
 

Annabuzzy

That's 'ma Lord Buzzy to you
Ski Pass
Jul 31, 2012
24,853
24,049
1,063
Sydney
I haven't skied for a while and this winter (Southern Hemisphere) I really want to get back into skiing. There's some crazy deals going around at the moment and I'm looking at getting a pair (or Pairs) of skis to replace my old stock.
I'm 45 years old, my ski weight is usually around 90kgs and I'm 178cm (5'10"). Most of my skiing will be here in Australia with an occasional overseas (Northern Hemisphere - USA/Canada/ Japan) trips also planned.
I'm a high intermediate and are relatively confident over a fair bit of the mountain probably not as much in bumps or super steep terrain.
I really like short and long turns (want to carve properly) on piste but want to discover more off piste (all mountain) in the future.
As I want to do some lessons/ training camps I was originally looking at more front side skis but recently have been also looking at more all mountain skis.
I want a ski thats going to help me improve (I want to carve real well) and ski the whole mountain but I'm happy to get 2 pairs (one for frontside and one for all mountain) if need be.
Some of the skis I have looked at are :
Head V10 Super Shape and also the E-Rally and E-Titan
Volkl Deacon 74 Black and Deacon 84
Nordica Enforcer 88
Rossignol Experience Series
K2 Disruption series.

If anyone has experience with these skis or can pass on any advice or recommendations of what they think would be a good fit for me, id be really grateful.

Cheers
Of that list I like the Nordica Enforcer 88 the best. I’ve been skiing the Blizzard Brahma as my every day ski in Oz for around 5 years at 88mm underfoot, and for the 4 years before that it was an 86mm underfoot Head. A ski of those dimensions skis great on piste in Oz, and is also a great shape in most Oz off piste.

I wouldn’t suggest the Brahma Incidentally but the Enforcer would be good. Also the K2 Mindbender 90ti. Most brands do something similar in that space frankly.

If it was me, I’d look at a second pair circa 98mm to 105mm for overseas. But right now the 88-90mm ski for Oz would be ideal and would also work great many places overseas.

I don’t think a narrower piste focused ski is the way to go. The 88 will carve very well and add more off piste versatility.
 

twisterella

First Runs
Oct 16, 2021
2
0
1
Of that list I like the Nordica Enforcer 88 the best. I’ve been skiing the Blizzard Brahma as my every day ski in Oz for around 5 years at 88mm underfoot, and for the 4 years before that it was an 86mm underfoot Head. A ski of those dimensions skis great on piste in Oz, and is also a great shape in most Oz off piste.

I wouldn’t suggest the Brahma Incidentally but the Enforcer would be good. Also the K2 Mindbender 90ti. Most brands do something similar in that space frankly.

If it was me, I’d look at a second pair circa 98mm to 105mm for overseas. But right now the 88-90mm ski for Oz would be ideal and would also work great many places overseas.

I don’t think a narrower piste focused ski is the way to go. The 88 will carve very well and add more off piste versatility.
Thanks for your input Anna. I have read some amazing things about the enforcer 88. I’m 178cm. They come in 167 172 179 and 186. Being on the heavier side do you think I should look at the 172/179?
 

Annabuzzy

That's 'ma Lord Buzzy to you
Ski Pass
Jul 31, 2012
24,853
24,049
1,063
Sydney
Thanks for your input Anna. I have read some amazing things about the enforcer 88. I’m 178cm. They come in 167 172 179 and 186. Being on the heavier side do you think I should look at the 172/179?
I’d say 179cm. I’m pretty much your dimensions and that’s what I’d do. 172cm isn’t out of the ball park though
 
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Sbooker

One of Us
Ski Pass
Sep 28, 2015
2,935
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I have Rustler 9s. They are lovely in almost all conditions. I have skied Enforcer 93 and they were great. I’m not heavy so I felt the Brahmas were too much for me when I skied those.
Mantra M5s are a good all rounder too in my view.
Modern skies are so good. Pick the all mountain about 90mm ski that you like the colour of and go with that. Pretty hard to go wrong really.
 

Any

One of Us
Ski Pass
Aug 23, 2015
1,541
3,212
363
oz/japan/usa
I've made many mistakes buying skis online.
Three times now I've wasted the most of a season attempting to "push through" a pair of skis I hated. Maybe its my technique and ill get better, maybe they'll wear in and get better, maybe ill just get used to them, maybe its my fault.

For two of those cases, In the end I still hated them. Didn't enjoy most the season. Wasted $ on skis. They stifled my skiing progression. And I bought another pair of skis anyway.

And the third case was a pair that I really persevered with only because they were just occasional use spring skis. They took so long to wear in to my liking (like 100 days) that now they're my rock skis.

It stings for years when you end up with a $1000 chunk of gear you regret. I still cringe when I see old photos of me with them, the same cringe you do when you hear a recording of your voice. I am embarrassed to have made such a mistake, multiple times!

Conversely, I've demo'ed pairs of skis that I instantly just knew I liked. I knew before I finished the first carve turn, even on terrain they weren't designed for (firm piste for pow skis for example). We were meant for eachother.
They have all been a joy to ski, I have fun every day on them, my progression goes through the roof, and old pictures bring up warm fond memories.
I would have rated my ability at high intermediate (by international standards) the first time this happened. So I think its not like you need to be some pro ski reviewer to "just know".

Doesn't matter how many stats or reviews you look at. I think skis are so particular per user that I don't think you can look at any amount of details stats or reviews and make a well informed decision.

I still buy skis online, I haven't really learned my lesson. But I try to stick to ski brands and ranges that I've skied before. Doesn't have to be the exact model, but something in a similar range.


My point is, that while there are great deals right now, it might be better off in the end to demo each pair first to make a proper decision.
Arguably cheaper, more fun and less regret in the long run.
 

Telemark Phat

Pass the butter
Ski Pass
Jun 21, 2008
22,479
23,373
1,063
45
Jindabyne
www.telemarkphat.org
I've made many mistakes buying skis online.
Three times now I've wasted the most of a season attempting to "push through" a pair of skis I hated. Maybe its my technique and ill get better, maybe they'll wear in and get better, maybe ill just get used to them, maybe its my fault.

For two of those cases, In the end I still hated them. Didn't enjoy most the season. Wasted $ on skis. They stifled my skiing progression. And I bought another pair of skis anyway.

And the third case was a pair that I really persevered with only because they were just occasional use spring skis. They took so long to wear in to my liking (like 100 days) that now they're my rock skis.

It stings for years when you end up with a $1000 chunk of gear you regret. I still cringe when I see old photos of me with them, the same cringe you do when you hear a recording of your voice. I am embarrassed to have made such a mistake, multiple times!

Conversely, I've demo'ed pairs of skis that I instantly just knew I liked. I knew before I finished the first carve turn, even on terrain they weren't designed for (firm piste for pow skis for example). We were meant for eachother.
They have all been a joy to ski, I have fun every day on them, my progression goes through the roof, and old pictures bring up warm fond memories.
I would have rated my ability at high intermediate (by international standards) the first time this happened. So I think its not like you need to be some pro ski reviewer to "just know".

Doesn't matter how many stats or reviews you look at. I think skis are so particular per user that I don't think you can look at any amount of details stats or reviews and make a well informed decision.

I still buy skis online, I haven't really learned my lesson. But I try to stick to ski brands and ranges that I've skied before. Doesn't have to be the exact model, but something in a similar range.


My point is, that while there are great deals right now, it might be better off in the end to demo each pair first to make a proper decision.
Arguably cheaper, more fun and less regret in the long run.
I'm the exact opposite. I've made all my worst ski purchase decisions after a demo day. The only demoing I've done recently was to see if my skiing was up to stepping up a level with my skis. But I enjoy diversity in my equipment, and the challenge of trying to get skis to do things they weren't meant to do..
 

Annabuzzy

That's 'ma Lord Buzzy to you
Ski Pass
Jul 31, 2012
24,853
24,049
1,063
Sydney
I've made many mistakes buying skis online.
Three times now I've wasted the most of a season attempting to "push through" a pair of skis I hated. Maybe its my technique and ill get better, maybe they'll wear in and get better, maybe ill just get used to them, maybe its my fault.

For two of those cases, In the end I still hated them. Didn't enjoy most the season. Wasted $ on skis. They stifled my skiing progression. And I bought another pair of skis anyway.

And the third case was a pair that I really persevered with only because they were just occasional use spring skis. They took so long to wear in to my liking (like 100 days) that now they're my rock skis.

It stings for years when you end up with a $1000 chunk of gear you regret. I still cringe when I see old photos of me with them, the same cringe you do when you hear a recording of your voice. I am embarrassed to have made such a mistake, multiple times!

Conversely, I've demo'ed pairs of skis that I instantly just knew I liked. I knew before I finished the first carve turn, even on terrain they weren't designed for (firm piste for pow skis for example). We were meant for eachother.
They have all been a joy to ski, I have fun every day on them, my progression goes through the roof, and old pictures bring up warm fond memories.
I would have rated my ability at high intermediate (by international standards) the first time this happened. So I think its not like you need to be some pro ski reviewer to "just know".

Doesn't matter how many stats or reviews you look at. I think skis are so particular per user that I don't think you can look at any amount of details stats or reviews and make a well informed decision.

I still buy skis online, I haven't really learned my lesson. But I try to stick to ski brands and ranges that I've skied before. Doesn't have to be the exact model, but something in a similar range.


My point is, that while there are great deals right now, it might be better off in the end to demo each pair first to make a proper decision.
Arguably cheaper, more fun and less regret in the long run.
I don’t recall a ski I didn’t quickly adapt to. Some are better for me than others, but I don’t recall a bad one. Ever! I really don’t!

That’s not to say don’t demo but I’m not enamoured of the time committed/benefit ratio.
 

dawooduck

relaxed and comfortable
Ski Pass
Oct 26, 2002
73,301
66,868
1,525
Mountains
Out of that selection and based on your stated criteria

Volkl Deacon 84 in 172

And then work on smooth transitions edge to edge

 

Hoodie

Hard Yards
Jan 4, 2018
90
45
68
I've made many mistakes buying skis online.
Three times now I've wasted the most of a season attempting to "push through" a pair of skis I hated. Maybe its my technique and ill get better, maybe they'll wear in and get better, maybe ill just get used to them, maybe its my fault.

For two of those cases, In the end I still hated them. Didn't enjoy most the season. Wasted $ on skis. They stifled my skiing progression. And I bought another pair of skis anyway.

And the third case was a pair that I really persevered with only because they were just occasional use spring skis. They took so long to wear in to my liking (like 100 days) that now they're my rock skis.

It stings for years when you end up with a $1000 chunk of gear you regret. I still cringe when I see old photos of me with them, the same cringe you do when you hear a recording of your voice. I am embarrassed to have made such a mistake, multiple times!

Conversely, I've demo'ed pairs of skis that I instantly just knew I liked. I knew before I finished the first carve turn, even on terrain they weren't designed for (firm piste for pow skis for example). We were meant for eachother.
They have all been a joy to ski, I have fun every day on them, my progression goes through the roof, and old pictures bring up warm fond memories.
I would have rated my ability at high intermediate (by international standards) the first time this happened. So I think its not like you need to be some pro ski reviewer to "just know".

Doesn't matter how many stats or reviews you look at. I think skis are so particular per user that I don't think you can look at any amount of details stats or reviews and make a well informed decision.

I still buy skis online, I haven't really learned my lesson. But I try to stick to ski brands and ranges that I've skied before. Doesn't have to be the exact model, but something in a similar range.


My point is, that while there are great deals right now, it might be better off in the end to demo each pair first to make a proper decision.
Arguably cheaper, more fun and less regret in the long run.
I agree, demo is the best way to go. Last Canada trip (2019/2020) I did a couple of demo days (took my skis from oz as well) and fell in love with a pair of DPS skis - they just really suited me and gave me 1,000% confidence - bad decision at the time, one which I am regretting I didn’t end up buying them, was challenged in the ski bag free space problem. I will never buy a pair of skis (or boots) off the rack without trying them. I tried 5 skis that I probably would have brought if not for demoing them however I really only like the one pair…
 
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