Question Sleeping pad size?

fenrir

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I recently purchased a very nice expedition sleeping bag from the Mont factory sale now I need to pair it with a sleeping mat. The bag is slightly on the larger size, maybe 195cm long. I've decided on using the Sea to Summit Etherlight XT Extreme mummy style mat because it's well insulated (R6.2), not too heavy and most of all cost effective (under $300). I am around 180cm tall and quite broad across the shoulders. There are 2 sized mats I am considering:

Large Womens - 183 x 64 wide
Large - 198 x 64 wide

Which would be most appropriate for touring given my size and the size of the bag? Is the bag dangling off the end of the mat onto the floor of the tent likely to be an issue in the backcountry?

ether-light-extreme-sizes-01[1].jpg
 

DidSurfNowSki

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I recently purchased a very nice expedition sleeping bag from the Mont factory sale now I need to pair it with a sleeping mat. The bag is slightly on the larger size, maybe 195cm long. I've decided on using the Sea to Summit Etherlight XT Extreme mummy style mat because it's well insulated (R6.2), not too heavy and most of all cost effective (under $300). I am around 180cm tall and quite broad across the shoulders. There are 2 sized mats I am considering:

Large Womens - 183 x 64 wide
Large - 198 x 64 wide

Which would be most appropriate for touring given my size and the size of the bag? Is the bag dangling off the end of the mat onto the floor of the tent likely to be an issue in the backcountry?
Only an issue if the sleeping bag hits the wall of the tent. So whichever pad + bag combo that doesn't do that.

If it does scrape, then take a rain jacket to wrap around the foot of the sleeping bag.
 

fenrir

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Only an issue if the sleeping bag hits the wall of the tent. So whichever pad + bag combo that doesn't do that.

If it does scrape, then take a rain jacket to wrap around the foot of the sleeping bag.
Pretty sure we're good, the bag is about 200 long and the tent is 220. There wont be water pooling on the floor from condensation down the walls?
 

Moondog55

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Walls slope and the thicker the sleeping bag and the deeper the mattress the closer the walls come.
This is why my 2P winter tent is sold as a 3P
 
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Kletterer

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Get used to your sleeping bag getting wet , and the outside and inside of your tent covered in ice etc. So make sure your sleeping bag repells water extremely well.
 
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fenrir

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No probs IMO in a good double wall winter tent, the opposite in a single wall tent.

I have the mont dragonfly so hopefully that helps keep the moisture down to begin with. Went with the large pad in the end so hopefully keeps me and the bag off the floor of the tent and away from the walls.
Is it possible to shorten a bag either permanantly or with velcro without impacting on performance?
 
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Moondog55

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It's easy to shorten a bag temporarily using a bungie, but the bottom of a long bag is a good place to store extra socks and such overnite.
 
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telecrag

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Windy nights are good to keep the condensation down.

The Dragonfly is a very large 2person, most brands would call it a 3. They look very good, 2 full size vestibules.
 
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legend

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Frozen condensation is taken for granted on the tent inner when temps drop to around -5ºC. Always expect condensation on the sleeping bag cover - it's because your whole body is shedding liquid (not just your breathing). The temperature difference between the inner and outer causing the moisture to settle on your bag. When temps drop to around -10ºC you'll have lots of ice crystals on your bag. Don't worry, all this surface moisture quickly evaporates and doesn't penetrate the down.
 

telecrag

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On mats, I bought the lightweight Downmat, didn’t realise at the time that the outside baffles have no fill, so had to develop techniques to prevent cold spots.

IMO exped made a big mistake with that.

Next mat will be a Thermarest, my old original one is probably still going strong somewhere, 30+ years on. My first Expee was awesome, but delaminated, got maybe 10 years out of that, so this will be the last Exped product I buy, they are obviously amateurs.
 
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fenrir

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On mats, I bought the lightweight Downmat, didn’t realise at the time that the outside baffles have no fill, so had to develop techniques to prevent cold spots.

IMO exped made a big mistake with that.

Next mat will be a Thermarest, my old original one is probably still going strong somewhere, 30+ years on. My first Expee was awesome, but delaminated, got maybe 10 years out of that, so this will be the last Exped product I buy, they are obviously amateurs.
I looked at the thermarest xtherm vs the exped downmat vs the sea to summit xt xtreme across so many reviews it made my head spin. The thermarest was hands down the best in terms of performance and weight but given I am unsure how many days I would do the xt extreme seemed like a good tradeoff between weight and price.
The downmat tended to not do so well in the real world as the down had a tendency to shift leading to significant cold spots.
 
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nezumi

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Does the hood of the bag have a "pillow sleeve" type of thing? Are you likely to have a pillow on top of the sleeping pad, or to put it on the tent floor directly (in which case the shorter mat might be viable?)
 

fenrir

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Does the hood of the bag have a "pillow sleeve" type of thing? Are you likely to have a pillow on top of the sleeping pad, or to put it on the tent floor directly (in which case the shorter mat might be viable?)
The pad has some 3m hooks to act as an attachment point for the pillow if needed.
 

hpsauce

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I recently purchased a very nice expedition sleeping bag from the Mont factory sale now I need to pair it with a sleeping mat. The bag is slightly on the larger size, maybe 195cm long. I've decided on using the Sea to Summit Etherlight XT Extreme mummy style mat because it's well insulated (R6.2), not too heavy and most of all cost effective (under $300). I am around 180cm tall and quite broad across the shoulders. There are 2 sized mats I am considering:

Large Womens - 183 x 64 wide
Large - 198 x 64 wide

Which would be most appropriate for touring given my size and the size of the bag? Is the bag dangling off the end of the mat onto the floor of the tent likely to be an issue in the backcountry?

ether-light-extreme-sizes-01[1].jpg
If I was 180cm, I would be perfectly happy with a 183 length for the backcountry (just a bit less to carry).
Either head or feet will need to be just off the end and I'd choose feet.
I'd put something (jacket, backpack, ski pants etc) under my feet at the end and all good.
But I have used 3/4 length pads on snow and frozen ground for ages and am used to using clothes or whatever I have to effectively lengthen my sleeping pad at the foot end.
Maybe I'd reconsider if really really cold.....
 
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fenrir

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If I was 180cm, I would be perfectly happy with a 183 length for the backcountry (just a bit less to carry).
Either head or feet will need to be just off the end and I'd choose feet.
I'd put something (jacket, backpack, ski pants etc) under my feet at the end and all good.
But I have used 3/4 length pads on snow and frozen ground for ages and am used to using clothes or whatever I have to effectively lengthen my sleeping pad at the foot end.
Maybe I'd reconsider if really really cold.....
That was my initial thinking but my bag is longer than 183 with hood. Also I figured having the ability to stretch my toes out and still be warm may be worth the 150g extra.
 

PAW

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I'm 187cm (probably a bit less now ). I've used standard size Exped Downmat 7 (claimed R value 5.7) which are 183cm - never had any problems with length, usually s side sleeper. I tried a lighter mat with a lower R value, but wasn't as warm (Klymit claimed R value 4.4). I advise to go for the warmest/lightest/most comfortable - in that order for me. The standard length should be OK. Extra length is heavier and bulkier.
This year I'm trying the S2S XT extreme, slightly lighter and less bulk than the old Exped but comfy at least at home.
 
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AndrewA

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I’m very happy with my Exped down mats, even though I’ve had one failure. As a side sleeper, I use the smallest version available, and just tuck my legs up onto the mat. I do put my rucksack beyond the mat if I end upon my back, so my feet don’t get too cold, but maybe that helps me subsequently side sleep??! My pillows (yep, 2 inflatable ones, toget the proper height) are above the mat, so there’s no wasted insulation below them. And I sleep under a 700g quilt in the snow, albeit in down jacket , pants and booties. Keeps weight down, and makes getting out of bed for a pee much easier, as I’m already clothed. System works well for me..minimises weight, maximises use of available gear. Similar outfit for summer, but 450g quilt, and no down pants/booties!
 

telecrag

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Whats the difference between a quilt, and an unzipped sleeping bag? And why do people like quilts? (Ive not had one, so genuine)
 
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AndrewA

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Less fabric and down in a quilt, so much lighter. It won’t wrap around you - only enough to go down to the mat. Nothing underneath. designs with a central flap to go over your head are a nice way to keep warm..,difficult to explain. Roger Caffins Bushwalking faqs explain better. In fact they revolutionised my thoughts about gear design and use.

 
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fenrir

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I believe part of the theory with the quilt is that since your insulated pad is already warm then putting more insulation under you is wasted weight. Some quilts also integrate into the sleeping pad at the toe box and have straps to wrap it around the edge to avoid air leaks.
 
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nezumi

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Whats the difference between a quilt, and an unzipped sleeping bag? And why do people like quilts? (Ive not had one, so genuine)

Lower weight generally, quilts will have straps that run beneath the sleeping pad to secure it so that you don't get drafts like a loose sleeping bag might, and you don't have a hood sitting over half of your face.
 
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