Snowsports fatalities

Discussion in 'Snow Talk' started by Mr. Mook, Apr 12, 2017.

  1. dawooduck

    dawooduck Pool Room
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    I excel at just missing things ....

    blew my knee doing a rhythm change from short to long turns on lovely groomed piste

    ain't life grand
     
  2. Moondog55

    Moondog55 Dedicated Member

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    My very first time on Alpine skis at Mt Buller I saw a feller kill himself when he ran into one of the old concrete tower supports.
    While it did not stop me from skiing I did slow down a lot after I stopped shaking.
    No attempt to slow, stop or turn, it was as if he did not even see the huge mass of concrete as a hazard or even see it at all. I was pretty close on the lift and I heard the "Crunch" and saw all the blood, confronting to say the least. But I think Iwa the only one becasue when I asked the other people on the lift if they saw it they asked me "Saw what?"
    I did notify the liftie about the accident and his reply was that the ski patrol would take care of it and he'd give them a hoy
     
  3. schneeschleicher

    schneeschleicher Active Member

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    "Ski shape has been found to influence the location, type and severity of downhill skiing injuries. This study found an increase in MCL injuries and injuries to the forearm, wrist and hand regions in skiers using shaped skis. However, skiers were less likely to sustain a concurrent ACL/MCL injury or a grade III ACL and/or MCL injury while using shaped skis, which the authors consider to be more severe injuries. From the results of this study, it therefore appears to be preferable to use shaped skis."

    Merkur, A., Whelan, K. M., Kuah, D., & Choo, P. (2003). The effect of ski shape on injury occurrence in downhill skiing. In Skiing Trauma and Safety: Fourteenth Volume. ASTM International. p.129-139.
     
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  4. Nidecker

    Nidecker Dedicated Member
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    Not having a dig at you at all, but you nailed the problem in a lot of cases, people daydreaming and NOT thinking ahead are a big problem, but hey, it's the same way everywhere in society. Why would we expect skiers to be different.

    edit: Oh and the study above? how did they control for improvements in binding / boot technology?
     
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  5. DidSurfNowSki

    DidSurfNowSki Dedicated Member
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    When people ask me why I enjoy skiing so much it's because you need to focus on the moment and that's all that you focus on. If you worry about what has passed, or what is further into the future (ie tomorrow) then you find yourself on the deck.
     
    #55 DidSurfNowSki, May 7, 2017
    Last edited: May 7, 2017
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  6. Nidecker

    Nidecker Dedicated Member
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    True, its like someone whinging about getting their legs caught at a mid station, doh!
     
  7. Mr. Mook

    Mr. Mook Dedicated Member
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    Oh no! that's a dig I totally deserve.
    It was really stupid and I deserved everything I got for it. I.E. I totally tore all the ligaments on the AC joint in my shoulder
    Afterwards I was more pissed off with myself for getting into that zone than the injury.
    I was just glad I came to my senses before I took someone else out.
     
  8. Mr. Mook

    Mr. Mook Dedicated Member
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    Yep that's what I should have been doing - just enjoying THAT run
     
  9. Chaeron

    Chaeron Dedicated Member
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    Take alcohol or people not wearing life-jackets when they should have, or people swimming in known rips or fishing off exposed rocks - all which could have been avoided out of the equation and the numbers would be way down - avoidable deaths, (not calculated risk-taking, but uninformed choices and carelessness) make up a massive amount of these drownings - especially inland!! I reckon the same principle holds for the punters on the snow (vs those skiers who are regularly exposed to higher risks, but have the experience to assess and manage it)
     
  10. Ramshead

    Ramshead Dedicated Member

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    My scariest ski moment was almost hitting this boulder at speed as I crashed spectacularly and ingloriously out of the Thredbo Top2Bottom. Destroyed my headcam in the process which is a damned shame cos the footage would have been interesting. Wanky indulgent match report here.

    [​IMG]
     
  11. WaitAwhile

    WaitAwhile Dedicated Member
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    Even for experienced skiers ,you've got to know when to call it quits for the day.
    And then come back the next day and do it all again.
    Many skiers used to compensate later in the day by doing less turns once they start to feel tired(and go faster) then make a silly error like catching an edge , do it in the wrong spot and the results can be pretty harsh especially if it involves hitting a solid object like a tree
    or large boulder. Even a helmet does not offer a lot of protection at high speed.
    The brain doesn't like being subjected to those sort of forces ,especially blunt force.
     
    #61 WaitAwhile, May 9, 2017
    Last edited: May 9, 2017
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  12. DPS Driver

    DPS Driver Dedicated Member

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    Mountain traffic moves quite differently today than what it did 20 years ago and another twenty before that.

    Today our resorts are busier than they have ever been with available terrain not expanding too much of late & growing skier numbers. We also have a mix of riding platforms which travel in different arcs to each other, ie ski & boards. We have greater safety products which give people a false sense of security, ie helmets and improved bindings, so as a result riders tend to push it a bit harder and incrementally the overall speed and flow moves with it, albeit with more obstacles to hit or avoid.

    We'll always have idiots skiing out of control, it's just that they have a greater chance of taking someone out today than they did years ago.
     
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  13. sly_karma

    sly_karma Part of the Furniture
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    FIS is convinced that speed and tight radius skis are a bad combo and have imposed minimum turning radius regulations for race skis in most disciplines. GS is the most notable as that is where the greatest number of knee injuries were observed. These days, skis for GS must be at least 35 m radius - basically like straight skis from the 80s. The turns look ugly to me.
     
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  14. sly_karma

    sly_karma Part of the Furniture
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    There's quite a few statements in this post. Boarders and skiers on different trajectories, very true. That inherent blind spot, and the different ways in which the two groups use a run. Skiers and boarders need to understand these differences and apply them when the run is crowded. What might appear to be a case of "stupid snowboarder came out of nowhere and hit me" could well have been a fairly predictable arc for a snowboarder to take.

    Equipment enabling greater risk - very debatable and almost impossible to study in any meaningful way. Ski bindings have had no meaningful advances in the past two decades, actually if anything they've gone a bit backwards with the current fad for emulating touring bindings. That has given us smaller bindings with fewer release modes and less convenience stepping in and out. The Knee Binding hasn't penetrated the market to any great degree.

    I'd suggest one more factor that might contribute to higher injury rates over time: climate change. Ski patrollers everywhere will tell you there are more crashes on sunny days, warmer temps mean more melt/freeze affected surfaces, and thinner snowpacks mean there's less filling in and softening of abrupt terrain transitions.
     
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  15. telecrag

    telecrag Part of the Furniture
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    Hey, we are so used to that last one here!
     
  16. climberman

    climberman CloudRide1000 Legend
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    Love the way the url string comes up LOL
     
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  17. Red_switch

    Red_switch Part of the Furniture
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    The acc stats here in nz paint an interesting picture on this. Ski areas are amongst the riskiest workplaces in nz.