1. There's more to this forum than meets the eye!

    We have a vibrant community here conversing about all sorts of non-snow topics such as music, sport, politics and technology. Simply register to reveal all our Après topics.

    NOTE: This notice may be closed.

    Dismiss Notice

The Back Country Curry Thread

Discussion in 'Backcountry' started by Mister Tee on XC Skis, Nov 28, 2020.

  1. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I am reading your book :)
    . As a person of Indian /Paki. Origin I must ask you this : were you eating those boil in the bag Indian meals without rice or bread?. If so then you have made a big mistake!
    :-0.
    Those boil in the bag desi khaana meals weigh a lot. They are fine for 1 or 2 nights but not 7 days of trekking rations. You can make your own noodle soups and cous cous meals for next to nothing using prepared dehydrated ingredients from East Asian grocery shops and they are lighter and easier as a dinner option on a multi night trek.
     
    #1 Mister Tee on XC Skis, Nov 28, 2020
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2020
  2. zapruda

    zapruda One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2017
    Messages:
    492
    Likes Received:
    1,485
    Location:
    Canberra
    While I agree with you about the weight of those meals, I have personally seen @Ramshead eat them with the absolute joy and enthusiasm. As a certified weight weenie myself, not even I can argue with that happiness to weight ratio.

    Take what makes you happy.
     
  3. Xplora

    Xplora One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,907
    Likes Received:
    3,861
    Sage words of advice from someone who admits to carrying a small car on his back. I have cut back on the weight of many things considerably just so I can take a few things I really enjoy. The good thing about that is you get lighter still as you consume them. I am with @zapruda on this. If you don't enjoy the food you take then you probably won't eat it and that does not help the body or the weight it carries. There are always compromises and of course a limit to the sensibility of carrying heavy food.
     
    Wally, Fozzie Bear and Chaeron like this.
  4. Ramshead

    Ramshead One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,396
    Likes Received:
    3,116
    Location:
    Sydney
    The curries weigh 300g each and I eat em with roti bread or Helgas wraps or even occasionally with a lovely pulao, which is another 300g of pre cooked rice. They make me happy and while my kit is on the heavy side by today’s ultralight standards, it’s still pretty manageable as I carry no other indulgence of any kind
     
  5. pegasusSki

    pegasusSki One of Us

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2015
    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    577
    bit of spice in the pack is a godsend for morale. I use Ainsley Harriot's Cous cous for weekend trips - partly as you don't need to boil the crap out of it and it can sit and soak for a few mins. Comes in at least 4 tasty "flavours" of which at least 1 purports to be spicy...
     
    Tanuki and skifree like this.
  6. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Roti is a Hindi word meaning Bread. Naan is a Persian word meaning Bread. I do not eat any kind of bread that we South Asians call double roti i.e . European leavened loaf bread.
    That is not bread! .
    Give me a freshly made chapatti, phulka, rumaali roti etc.. Surely taking uncooked basmati rice would use a tad more stove fuel but be both tasty and weight efficient?. I am a Desi khaana / Indian food snob . The weight of these rations is a consideration when doing a 5 night plus hike but the mode of consumption is the main issue here!. Cous cous uses less fuel , takes less time to cook , uses less water , is filling and is quite tasty and works well as a rice substitute when trekking for 5 nights or more .

    Sharwood is also a brand of Anglo Indian food condiments including pickles and curry pastes.
    Sharwood Surname Origin, Meaning & Last Name History (forebears.io)
     
  7. Ramshead

    Ramshead One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,396
    Likes Received:
    3,116
    Location:
    Sydney
    I love your food snobbery mate. Would expect no less. So basically, calling rotis “roti bread” is like calling Bogong Mt Bogong! PS Sharwood’s Indian pastes, chutney etc is all junk. No relation. My parents married with an unspellable Eastern European name which they thereafter Anglicised
     
  8. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Yes Sharwoods' condiments are rubbish. Made by White Indian born colonials I suspect and transported back to the UK after Partition to foist upon less than purist UK denizens who thought a chip buttee was fine dining !.

    I have my favourite brands of Indian and Sri Lankan grocery foods. Most Paki. brands are just rubbish such as SHAN. They have Too much salt and not enough taste for pre mixed powder masalas.
    "Pak. is like a dodgy version of India" as one of my old girlfriends remarked when she travelled to India and Pak. with me some 21 years ago.
    MD Original mango chutney from Sri Lanka is a winner.
    Pilsbury aatta( whole meal flour) for making your own chapatti
    India gate classic basmati rice
    Mrs.Ferns' pickles and pastes from Bombay
    Most of the south Indian boil in the bag meals [Priya brand] are good for ski trips of just 2-3 nights.
    Not all Indian natural yoghurt brands are the same either!
     
    #8 Mister Tee on XC Skis, Nov 29, 2020
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2020
    DPS Driver likes this.
  9. neilmny

    neilmny One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2013
    Messages:
    1,347
    Likes Received:
    1,862
    Heretic!.....you suggest a chip buttee is not fine dining.......shame on you. :nono:
     
    crackson, Fozzie Bear, Tanuki and 4 others like this.
  10. Ramshead

    Ramshead One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,396
    Likes Received:
    3,116
    Location:
    Sydney
    Shan is indeed too salty. Have made hone curries from their spice mixes. My god the salt. I enjoy druk pickles. There are many Nepalese grocers near me. I believe it is Nepalese pickle
     
  11. pegasusSki

    pegasusSki One of Us

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2015
    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    577
    Mr Tee, I worked out years ago the secret to a fine curry is lots of onions, garlic and not so much ginger - and a modicum - half a teaspoon of each spice: tumeric, cumin and lots of chilli etc in the tomato sauce so it doesn't burn. Garam masala is a flavoring spice and goes in at the end. Loads of fresh coriander.

    I have eaten a lot of restaurant-style food this way and refuse to use any cookbook - they simply overdue the spices and they are easy to burn resulting in a bitter taste...
    thoughts?
     
  12. climberman

    climberman CloudRide1000 Legend Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2000
    Messages:
    42,487
    Likes Received:
    33,728
    Location:
    the sunny illawarra
    crackson, GS, Telemark Phat and 2 others like this.
  13. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    As someone of South Asian descent who has taught adults Indian cookery in community centres , esp. how to make NW Indian and South Indian food as well as knowing some Bangla and Gujarati dishes too, I shall consider my reply carefully.....But first I must make some chappattis for my lunch.
     
  14. Telemark Phat

    Telemark Phat Pass the butter Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    19,788
    Likes Received:
    17,329
    Location:
    Jindabyne
    So wrong. You need heaps more spice, coriander for example should be used by the table spoon. If you're burning your spices you either need to either/or: move faster, use more liquid in your spice paste, use a lower heat or a better saucepan.

    Cookbooks are your friend, even if only as a guide.
     
  15. Telemark Phat

    Telemark Phat Pass the butter Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    19,788
    Likes Received:
    17,329
    Location:
    Jindabyne
    Poori are my favourite.
     
  16. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Poori is a deep fried item. I avoid most deep fried foods. In South India they seem to offer rice or poori with a set meal/ thaali . I prefer Phulka which is whole wheat flat bread cooked without oil and puffs up using its own steam when applied ( using tongs ) to a naked gas flame. Phulka is very Punjabi.
     
  17. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Cooking true home style genuine South Asian regional food when trekking independently is possibly not feasible for a true purist. It can be done and requires a mini desi rasoi/ Indian kitchen of ingredients and implements. When Trekking in the Indian Himalaya my experience comes from the porters/ cooks et al who seem to whip up tasty Indian food no matter what while out on the trail on a paid expedition.
    If you want to know how to make what Punjabi people eat at home ,esp . Indian Veg. food using your own home kitchen then I can offer my recipes.
    When trekking here in Oz and doing 4 Nights plus out in the wild I have decided DIY noodle soups and cous cous dishes are a good compromise.
    I used to make Puliogari <<Puliyogare recipe | Tamarind rice - Swasthi's Recipes (indianhealthyrecipes.com)>> on a hike using premade spice paste that comes in the Malabar Iyers brand plastic jar.
    Making a kichidi <<Khichdi Recipe | Bon Appétit (bonappetit.com)>> is quite feasible and I have made an approximation of such a dish while on an overnight white season trip or green season bushwalking.
     
  18. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    I cannot agree with you about your discovery of the key to Desi khaana.. Recipes for Daal for example change every 50 kms in the South Asian Sub. cont. from Kabul to Dhaka and from Kathmandu to Chennai and Kandy . When I was in Sri Lanka I was served Daal that had coconut milk in it which is not unlike what you get in Kerala in South India.
    Most people think of Daal being Daal Tadka which is a.k.a Daal Fry as found in Punjab and U.P. etc. or Daal Makhani ( Butter Daal) as found in Punjab and lower Himachal Pradesh.
    People eat what they can obtain so if there is a tamarind tree and a jackfruit tree in the front yard in Maharasthra or Bengal then people will use those ingredients. The same goes for coconut , red chillies, different kinds of pulses and beans in different regions and different kinds of oil and ghee being used as a cooking medium.
    In Karnataka in one area in particular they eat roti made of ground millet. Wheat and rice don't seem to grow so well in that hot and dry inland peninsular area.
    I quite like Iddli made of millet and semolina.
    Having travelled extensively in the region my experience tells me there is no one true way to make any dish . In some areas locals eat some things that others in another region may not recognize!.
     
    Tanuki, piolet and Telemark Phat like this.
  19. Telemark Phat

    Telemark Phat Pass the butter Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    19,788
    Likes Received:
    17,329
    Location:
    Jindabyne
    I have no regional loyalties. I'll happily mix and match Sub Continental style food from around the world.
     
    pegasusSki likes this.
  20. rowdyflat

    rowdyflat One of Us Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Messages:
    3,550
    Likes Received:
    4,852
    Location:
    Yackandandah NE Victoria
    Back country standard quick and easy is , mix and match 2 min noodles or Couscous or angelhair pasta + red lentil curry using an Indian paste or Mae Ploy which are fantastic Thai pastes.
    When I have curry at friends' places I now bring extra chilli, I find most Aussies dont use enough salt or spices .
     
    pegasusSki likes this.
  21. Moondog55

    Moondog55 One of Us

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,014
    Likes Received:
    1,109
    Every time I make daal it's different, not because I don't know how but because I like to experiment.
    As I peck away at the keyboard I have English style green split peas cooking for tonites dinner, next week it may be chickpeas or black beans I add peanut butter to daal all the time and often add coconut cream rather than spinach. All food is good when cooked well and with passion, sometimes I swear I can taste the love in good food. Also on the go is a big pot of Chicken Makani in the English style, not all British Indian food is rubbish and personally I prefer the Shardwoods Major Greys chutney to most others
     
    Ian and pegasusSki like this.
  22. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Butter Chicken ( murghi makhani) is a UK invention . So Is Chicken Tikka masala. If you go to Gujarat
    the word " curry " means something like
    " I f...........d your sister and she was a screamer" and will get you a slap in the face!
    :-0
    . I cannot countenance any non purist /not just like the real thing in India type dishes. It is ignorance crossed with heresy and blasphemy and combined with a travesty of mangled traditions and corrupted culinary culture.

    I am now covering my ears and eyes and saying La La La La La ( Arabic for no)
     
  23. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Most Ozzies think "Indian food " is flat bread and orange chicken i.e. naan and tandoori chicken. This is in fact originally food from Kabul in Afghanistan and was brought to the plains of India by Sindhi and Punjabi traders.
     
  24. Moondog55

    Moondog55 One of Us

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,014
    Likes Received:
    1,109
    Yes but not by the English, it was people from the subcontinental region catering to the English tastes. Nothing wrong with that at all and cooks and chefs have been doing that for thousands of years. I quite enjoy Indian food and I tent to lump all subcontinental cuisines as "Indian" because that's how I was brought up. I have to keep apologising to my local grocers [ one Pakistani the other from Taprobane] when I get it wrong. Curry is Anglicised from the Portuguese and used to mean dust/rubbish/dregs in the 15th century
     
    #24 Moondog55, Nov 30, 2020
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2020
    Tanuki likes this.
  25. pegasusSki

    pegasusSki One of Us

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2015
    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    577
    :)I use copious amounts of coriander. I just find that heaps of eg cumin and tumeric taste terrible,even if added to lots of sauce. An indian colleague told me to add all ground spice to liquid unless they are fresh like a seed in which case they can be fried a bit.

    I once tripled the tumeric by mistake and that to my taste ruined the dish. Each to his own.

    It seems my taste for curry is more Bangladeshi...as you say it all depends.
    I once found a website that purported to make restaurant style dishes and that's where I developed my method relying on onions and caramelising, focusing less on the spices (dialling them back as I admit). I'm happy to use it as it gets the taste I am after: hot (the chilli talks), piquant, fragrant, Indian, but not so 'Indian spicy' that I feel I am eating spices.

    I find the cuisine fascinating as it does seem to have been adapted around the world.
     
  26. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Wrong . Kaari is a Tamil word meaning sauce.The British set up a trading station in the early 1600's at what became the city of Madras, now known as Chennai. It was here they first encountered " Indian Food".
    They mangled the word Kaari and now it is set in English for good as that word with its cliched connotations.
    The word Indian comes from The Indus River which is mostly now found in Pakistan.
     
  27. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    The Bangladeshis in Brick Lane make what they think the English think Punjabi food is. The real deal is lost in this bizarre process. Real Bengali food is full of black pepper, mustard and green chillie.Their daal is a watery yellow concoction.They eat a lot of fish and rice and they have a Mughal / Afghan influence culinary influence too.
     
    pegasusSki likes this.
  28. skifree

    skifree A disciple of the blessed avi giraffe Moderator Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 1998
    Messages:
    29,068
    Likes Received:
    25,295
    Location:
    Middle Oz
    Does any of this matter?

    How about some useful recipes?
     
  29. Ramshead

    Ramshead One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,396
    Likes Received:
    3,116
    Location:
    Sydney
    I covered an IPL match in Delhi once in my sports journalism travels. There were 35 delicious curries in the media room, because Indian cricket matches have many media and they are all starving. I ate a lot but not as much as Andy Bichel. Story ends.
     
    crackson, GS, piolet and 1 other person like this.
  30. Moondog55

    Moondog55 One of Us

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,014
    Likes Received:
    1,109
    Kaari yes I might/would agree but Curry in English is as I said derived from the Portuguese.
    I would believe that if the main language in the region that is now Goa was Tamil then it could have carried over, but the term has been common usage for a very long time. The English were comparatively late into India.
     
  31. Moondog55

    Moondog55 One of Us

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,014
    Likes Received:
    1,109
    Fry onions, add garlic and ginger and spices. Add water or stock. Cook spice mix until it tastes right. Now add meat or vegetables as required, simmer until tender. All cooking is the application of heat and time to ingredients, all that changes are the ingredients and the method
     
  32. legend

    legend One of Us

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2004
    Messages:
    1,732
    Likes Received:
    400
    Location:
    lakes entrance
    Here's a link to an amazing mango chicken curry…
    https://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/mango_chicken_curry/
    I chop the onion up finely and use the bottled red bell pepper. No need for sugar if you use ripe mango.
    Easy to cook and dry.
    When cooked use two forks to shred the chicken and squash the mango.
    Lay out on a solid tray (until reasonably solid) then turn over and place onto a mesh tray.
    I dry this at around 40ºC.
     
    Ian likes this.
  33. Moondog55

    Moondog55 One of Us

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,014
    Likes Received:
    1,109
    Try substituting tamarind paste for the vinegar and or cheap mango chutney rather than fresh mangoes.
    I think we also have to realise that there may be a huge gulf between foods eaten depending on the wealth of the family eating this food.
    Some of my friends have family that are so wealthy in Indian terms that none of them ever had to cook for themselves and still can't cook. One couple in particular have not even used the kitchen in their home, not in seven years, they eat all of the meals in restaurants or have food delivered
     
    pegasusSki likes this.
  34. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Daal tadka ( spiced lentils) a.k.a Daal fry



    Ingredients

    Yellow Moong daal (split and hulled) ; 300 Grams.



    Veg. Oil ( Not Olive oil , Mustard oil, Peanut oil or Sunflower oil are better for this) , say 4-5 table spoons

    One finely diced onion

    5 peeled and finely diced cloves of garlic

    2 -3 diced green chillies

    1 peeled chunk of fresh finely chopped ginger, diced

    1 table spoon of garlic /ginger paste

    Up to 400 g of yellow mung daal

    2 teaspoons of whole cumin seeds

    2 “ “ “ “ mustards seeds

    3 teaspoons of salt

    One teaspoon of turmeric

    One table spoon of cumin powder

    “ “ “ “ Coriander powder

    3 tea spoons of garum masaala

    1 teaspoon of fennel seeds,

    1 teaspoon of fenugreek seeds

    A pinch of red chillie powder or crushed whole red chillies x2.

    Whole cardamom brown x2,

    Two whole cloves

    A sprig of whole cinnamon stick crushed up by hand

    One big lemon worth of lemon juice or a tea spoon of tamarind concentrate.

    Curry leaves 7, fresh.

    Salt to taste, don't be shy!!!!

    Tomatoes-chopped(optional)





    Method


    Boil the daal in plenty of water in a big pot .Make sure you cover the volume of Daal with at least the same amount of water.



    Heat a large fry pan with the oil

    When HOT add the whole cumin, fennel, fenugreek and mustard seeds, allow them to SIZZLE

    Then

    ADD the chopped onions, cardamom, cinnamon, and cloves and ginger and garlic. With the ginger /garlic paste and the salt and stir well on med. Flame, yes GAS not hotplates. When golden but not overdone add

    The tomatoes and the green chillies, curry leaves stir really well and allow cooking for a few min.s

    Add all the powdered spices and remaining ingredients and stir in and cook for another 2 min.s on med. Stirring stirring .


    When the daal is soft , drain any extra water if needed, but leave some fluid in the pot, it will evaporate and thicken when it is left to stand .

    Add the fry pan ingredients to the daal and stir really well. Add lemon juice /or tamarind concentrate, stir again and a big pinch of garum masaala sprinkled on top. Optional garnish =chopped fresh coriander.


    Serve with chapattis, or naan or basmati rice or Lebanese bread and indian pickle and natural yoghurt.

    I sometimes make a simpler Daal without the whole cinnamon, cardamom, cloves, and fenugreek and just sizzle whole mustard seeds, cummin/ zeera seeds and fennel seeds in the oil and add the powered spices as above.I don't add tomatoes very often unless I am using chana daal which keeps its shape.
     
  35. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    karela sabzi - dry bitter gourd curry made in north indian style.

    RECIPE TYPE: Veg. curry

    CUISINE: north indian

    SERVES: 2-3

    INGREDIENTS (measuring cup used, 1 cup = 250 ml)

    · 5-6 medium sized karela/bitter gourd/bitter wrinkly green melon.

    · 2 or 3 medium sized onions

    · ½ tsp turmeric powder or haldi

    · ¼ tsp red chili powder

    · ¼ tsp garam masala powder

    · ¼ or ½ tsp amchur powder or dry mango powder

    · 2 tbsp oil

    · salt

    INSTRUCTIONS

    First slice the karela, remove the seeds, they are toxic, salt the karela. Leave it for 20 min.s then rinse it and drain it.This will make it less bitter and safe to eat.

    1. Peel the karelas. Wash them in running water. Chop them. You can even slice them. Remove the seeds.

    2. Slice the onions too.

    3. In a kadai/wok or pan, heat oil. Add the chopped or sliced bitter gourds.

    4. Saute the bitter gourd on medium heat for 2 minutes. Lower the flame and saute for 2-3 minutes more.

    5. Add the sliced onions.

    6. Mix the sliced onions with the bitter gourd.

    7. Saute for 2-3 minutes.

    8. Now add the turmeric powder, red chili powder and salt.

    9. Stir. Cook the sabzi without any lid for 7-8 minutes till the both the karela and onions are cooked and sauted well. The onions will become brown. Keep on stirring in between. Check the seasoning. Add more red chili powder or salt if required.

    10. When the Karela sabzi is ready, sprinkle the amchur and garam masala powder. Mix it with the entire sabzi/vegies.

    11. Garnishing Karela Sabzi with chopped cilantro/coriander leaves is optional.

    12. Serve Karela Sabzi with phulkas/roti/chappatti, parathas and a bowl of fresh plain curd/yoghurt or sweetened curd/yoghurt. Karela Sabzi also goes very well as a side vegetable dish or accompaniment with the combination of dal rice or kadhi chawal ( punjabi curd kadhi with rice)

    NUTRITION INFORMATION

    SERVING SIZE: 4
     
  36. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Don’t be afraid of this Bengali fish recipe. Try it. I bet you’ll be amazed. Good luck!

    Ingredients

    Serves 4

    1 kg Ocean fish fillets, scaled but unskinned (if you can’t find Shad, Halibut will do)
    1 tsp salt, plus extra to taste
    2 tsp turmeric
    4-5 medium fresh green chilies
    2 ½ tbsp each of brown and black mustard seeds
    12 fl.oz warm water
    1 tsp red chilli powder
    11/2fl oz mustard oil
    1 banana leaf (or heatproof paper)

    Freshly cooked Basmati Rice, 4 cups

    Method

    Wash the fish pieces and rub with a mixture of 1 tsp each of salt and turmeric. Roughly chop 2 of the green chilies; slice the remainder lengthwise.

    Soak the mustard seeds in 5fl. oz. of the warm water for 20 minutes, then blend to a fine paste with the chopped chilies and red chili powder. Add the remaining warm water as required. The consistency needs to be thick for coating. Fold in the mustard oil and add salt to taste.

    Cut the banana leaf into 6 inch squares . Place the a piece of fish on each leaf, coat liberally with the mustard paste, place a slice of green chilli on top and fold the leaf over to make a closed packet. Secure with string. If using halibut, dip the fish in the paste, add the chilies in the same way, coat well and wrap similarly.


    You must use banana leaves !!! and use string or sewing thread to seal them and tie them up. The banana leaves add taste and can be obtained from Vietnamese shops.You steam cook these parcels. They are amazing !
     
  37. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Punjabi cooking




    Menu:

    Aloo saag

    ( boiled potato cubes with spiced spinach puree` )

    Chapatti

    ( hand made flat wholemeal Indian wheat bread cooked on a cast iron skillet))

    Served with Indian mixed pickles( from a jar from an Indian grocery shop) and Raita ( as per first session).

    Aloo Saag

    Ingredients

    5 large potatoes

    Two Large bunches of fresh spinach( rinsed, cleaned and chopped) . 3 packets of frozen spinach will work OK but not as well as fresh spinach.

    1 large onion: peeled and finely chopped

    2 tablespoons of ginger/ garlic paste

    Salt to taste

    Two green chillies ( finely chopped)

    Two cloves of fresh garlic( peeled and chopped)

    3 cloves

    4 crushed fresh green cardamom pods

    A heaped teaspoon of whole cumin seeds

    ¼ stick of hand crushed whole cinnamon

    Table spoon of cumin powder

    Tablespoon of coriander powder

    Tea spoon of turmeric powder

    Half a teaspoon of red chili powder

    One teaspoon of freshly ground black pepper.

    5 -6 tablespoons of sunflower oil

    Half a tin of chopped skinned tomatoes.

    A small handful of dried fenugreek leaves, hand crushed.


    Some chopped coriander leaves for garnish

    Some garam masala powder for garnish.

    You will need two large pots for boiling a large volume of water x 2 .

    A large fry pan

    An electric kitchen blender/ food processer.


    Method

    Boil the potatoes whole , skin and all in a large pot of water.


    Heat another large pot of water . We will blanch the prepared spinach in this for 2 min.s , max. ,when the water is boiling furiously.


    1.Put the fry pan on high heat and add the oil. When the oil is hot then add the cumin seeds. Allow them to sizzle

    Now add the onions, garlic, ginger/ garlic paste, cloves, cardamom, cinnamon and stir and fry on Med. Flame.

    Add the salt now. Stir it well.

    Leave until the onions etc. are soft and clear.

    Now add the tomatoes, chillies and dried fenugreek leaves and stir and cook for a few minutes.

    Now add the powdered /ground spices and stir well on Med. Heat for a minute.

    The seasoning for the spinach is ready. Turn off the heat from the fry pan.


    2. Add the chopped spinach to the boiling water. Stir it in.DO NOT PUT THE LID ON IT. If You do then the nice green colour will be lost.

    Take it out after 2 min.s max. and strain it in a colander.

    Now put it into the Blender and blend on full power until it is liquid.

    Now add this green puree` to the pot that contained the water that the spinach wad boiled in. Now add the fried stuff from the fry pan. Mix it together well.


    3.

    Take the cooked boiled potatoes out of the boiling water.

    Drain and rinse them in cold water. The skin will come off easily. Remove the skins. Cut them into large cubes.

    4. Now add the potatoes to the spiced spinach puree` and stir it around. Simmer on Very low. Add some extra water for this , maybe half to a whole coffee cup of tap water.

    Simmer until the oil rises to the surface.

    Now turn off the stove and add the coriander leaves and garam masala.



    How to make your own flat Indian bread.

    Chapatti / Phulka/ Tava ki Roti.



    Ingredients

    At least to 500 G of Wholemeal stone ground Indian wheat flour

    a.k.a atta ( pronounced :aahttah)

    A big pinch of salt


    Water as per required







    TOOLS

    Rolling pin

    Metal tongs,

    a cotton cloth

    A cloth bag for storing hot bread.

    A big mixing bowl

    A cast iron skillet a.k.a as a ‘ tava’ ( pronounced Tahvah)

    You could roll the dough out very thinly and use

    an upside-down wok on a gas flame.




    Method

    Put the flour into the mixing bowl. Add the salt and stir it in with a fork.

    Now put the mixing bowl next to the sink. Turn on the cold tap and add a small bit of water to the flour one step at a time and stir it in with the fork

    Until it all looks like small lumps that are kind of dry.

    Now wet your fist and start punching the water into the half made dough . Keep wetting your fist over and over and turn the half made dough over so that the water is mixed into the flour properly and it starts the kneeding process simultaneously.

    Once the whole lot is mixed together well then put a lid on the bowl and allow it to stand for 30 minutes.

    Once the time is up then put some more fresh flour onto a work surface and some more into a plate from which you easily add more flour.

    Take the half made dough out of the mixing bowl and put it onto the work surface. Sprinkle it with flour and start punching it with your fist and keep turning and dusting it lightly so it will not stick.

    Once it has become proper dough you will know because the dough will spring back when you poke it with one finger. This usually takes 5 minutes.

    Put it back in the mixing bowl and cover it with a lid for 10 minutes at least. At home in cooler weather I leave it to rise overnight. This produces good results. In summer it quickly turns to sour dough.

    Heat the hotplate/skillet/tava/ upturned wok on a gas fire

    On HIGH HEAT.

    Take a ball of dough about the size of a mandarin or small lemon and dust it in flour.

    Roll it out flat on the dusted work surface. Ensure it is rough round and not too big. If using an upside down wok then roll these balls out more thinly.

    Ensure the rounds of rolled out dough do not exceed the circumference of the cooking surface.

    Take one round and pat it between each hand a few times a bit like a Pizza maker does.

    Slap it onto the cooking surface.

    Turn it over each 10-20 seconds with the metal tongs.

    Once both sides are semi cooked start pressing down the doughy uncooked bit with a cloth or tea towel.

    Once it starts to puff up in segments take the roti and using the tongs put it over the hot gas flame so that it puffs up into a balloon.

    This takes practice and skill but if the bread puffs up completely using its own steam it will be lighter and tastier.

    BEWARE. The hot bread contains steam inside it that will burn your hands.

    Use the tongs to put the cooked bread into a cloth bag to keep it warm until you are ready to eat the bread with a main course.

    Repeat these steps until you have enough fresh hot bread per person.

    Usually two chappattis ( 2 pieces of flat bread) will be more than filling and sufficient for each person. Use it to eat the main dishes with your hands in a “bread and dip , scoop and eat fashion”.


    Some people like garlic butter or Ghee ( clarified butter) on their roti but that is unhealthy!

    Put the rest of the dough left over into the refrigerator.

    Make fresh roti each time you eat a meal. That is how it is done in the sub cont. and in Eastern Afghanistan.

    Some dishes from the bread eating area of the NW Sub Cont. , go well with this kind of bread.

    Chana masala

    ( boiled chic peas in a spiced sauce),

    Daal,

    mix veg masala,

    masala omlette,

    Saag ( spinach)

    etc.
     
    piolet likes this.
  38. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne




    Seviyan Kheer

    Vermicelli Milk dessert.

    Ingredients

    Whole Milk Powder 3 cups

    4 cups or more of water

    OR

    You can use a litre of fresh whole milk.

    Either way ensure the vermicelli is well covered

    and can agitate freely when boiling and being stirred.

    Short cut roasted vermicelli 150 G-200 G.

    6 crushed whole green cardamom pods

    ¼ stick of hand crushed cinnamon

    One coffee cup of brown raw sugar

    A handful of sultanas

    A handful of almonds and cashews.

    A teaspoon of powdered cardamom powder

    A teaspoon of powdered cinnamon powder

    A table spoon of rose water

    A pinch of salt.


    Method.

    Boil the milk in a big pot

    Add the whole spices and the vermicelli

    Now boil on med/ high watching it , stirring it so it does not boil over.

    After about 10 min.s max. it should be cooked and the fluid will have reduced.

    Now add the pinch of salt , the sugar , nuts , dried fruit and stir really well.




    Turn the stove off

    Add the rose water and powdered spices and stir.


    Wait until it cools and slightly sets.If too much milk has evaporated the add a bit more straight whole cream milk to it in order to keep it a bit wetter like runny creamed rice.

    It is ready to eat!

    An even quicker version of this basic dessert is to use rice powder a.k.a Firni ( pronounced Fearnee). I shall furnish you all with that recipe soon :).
     
  39. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Coconut chutney ( Tamil style)

    Ingredients



    Half a packet of frozen grated coconut.

    You will need to saw the frozen packet in half and allow one half to thaw out. Put the other half back into the freezer.

    Two green chillies: chopped

    A teaspoon of salt

    A tablespoon of channa daal or yellow split peas

    5-10 fresh curry leaves


    A heaped teaspoon of black mustard seeds

    Some cooking oil

    Half a teaspoon of tamarind paste concentrate

    A Kitchen blender



    Method

    Put the coconut , chilli and salt into the blender with about a half a coffee cup of water.

    Blend it on full power until it is all mashed well through and mixed well.

    Pour this out into resealable food container and set aside.

    Heat the oil , just a enough to coat the bottom of the small saucepan

    And add the mustard seeds and the daal and allow it to sizzle on high heat for a second and then turn it down to low – med.

    Add the curry leaves. Stand back , they will crackle and

    sizzle a lot.

    Once the daal is light brown pour all of this incl. the oil into the blended mixture and stir well.

    Now add the tamarind paste & stir in really well.

    It is ready !!

    Store in the fridge and consume within 7 days.

    This is perfect with South Indian things such as
    vada, iddli or dosai.
    I often omit adding the chana daal or yellow split peas. It is quicker and safer for your teeth .
     
    #39 Mister Tee on XC Skis, Nov 30, 2020
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2020
    DidSurfNowSki, piolet and pegasusSki like this.
  40. Moondog55

    Moondog55 One of Us

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2014
    Messages:
    2,014
    Likes Received:
    1,109
    Thanks for sharing.
     
    Mister Tee on XC Skis likes this.
  41. pegasusSki

    pegasusSki One of Us

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2015
    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    577
    it's no secret...

    So:
    I fry loadsa:
    Onions, Garlic. Fry until they caramelise a bit, then some ginger not too much.

    Bung a tin of tomatoes in, or 2 - depends on the consistency you want.
    Half a teaspoon of Cumin and Tumeric. Maybe a teaspoon of cumin. Hard to believe I know but true.

    Add 2 chillis. Snip them in with scissors, the whole lot. Maybe a green one, large and a birdseye.

    Simmer for an hour.

    To serve, garam masala - and copious fresh coriander (I don't deny that this is where you don't hold back).
    Let sit.

    Cook chicken on bbq so skin charoals a bit, then add. [The missus is a vegetarian so I can keep back some sauce for her.
    I find that this recipe doesn't work so well with vegetarian - it needs the fat from the poultry].

    Looking at it, it seems really bizarre that's all I do - but it tastes great. It took me years to work out that I didn't need teaspoons of spices.





    .
     
  42. Telemark Phat

    Telemark Phat Pass the butter Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2008
    Messages:
    19,788
    Likes Received:
    17,329
    Location:
    Jindabyne
    You're so missing out. You can get different flavours by cooking spices at the beginning, middle or end of a curry. Combinations are also great.
     
  43. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    The basic spice mix / masalaa for a Desi main course dish as we know it usually has: cumin powder; corriander powder; black pepper powder;salt;tumeric;red chilly powder. Most likely in that order of concentration.

    I love tamarind. Some communities such as the Jains do not eat onions, garlic or ginger. Hence the unique taste of Gujarati food with its red chillies, asafetida, ghee and mustard seeds all of which are derived from above ground sources.They do many interesting things with besan and other ground legumes making steamed savoury cakes.
    So many dishes I make are dry , without a sauce, no gravy and are tossed in heated oil with a spice mix to coat the pre cooked potatoes and cauliflower for example.The Daal is usually the contrasting dish that is thinner and more fluid.
     
    piolet likes this.
  44. Mister Tee on XC Skis

    Mister Tee on XC Skis A Local Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2015
    Messages:
    9,277
    Likes Received:
    8,696
    Location:
    Melbourne
    Mirchi ka salan - Wikipedia
    My late Uncle's wife was from Indian Hyderabad. She moved to Karachi after partition as did my Step Mother.
    The Hyderabadis have their own culinary traditions that mix the North Indian Urdu speakers' food with South Indian things such as Tamarind and Coconut and curry leaves.
     
    piolet likes this.
  45. Ramshead

    Ramshead One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2006
    Messages:
    1,396
    Likes Received:
    3,116
    Location:
    Sydney
    I think we should have a ski.com.au curry cook off at Taylors Crossing on the Mitta Mitta River on New Year's Eve. Who's in?
     
  46. GS

    GS Part of the Furniture Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    May 20, 2004
    Messages:
    11,706
    Likes Received:
    16,120
    Location:
    Yarra Valley Vic
    This thread is making me hungry.

    As Seinfeld would say
     
    telecrag and Ramshead like this.
  47. Dave.Ski

    Dave.Ski Hard Yards Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2008
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    103
    Location:
    Melbourne
    You might meet some old friends! Watch out for those snakes too..
     
    Ramshead likes this.
  48. pegasusSki

    pegasusSki One of Us

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2015
    Messages:
    582
    Likes Received:
    577
    Mr Tee - understand Fenugreek is an ingredient forgotten about. I have some stashed in a tub but forget to use..
     
  49. Tanuki

    Tanuki Part of the Furniture Ski Pass: Gold

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2010
    Messages:
    11,068
    Likes Received:
    7,178
    Slightly off topic, but was has happened to the world supply of Mango Pickles? Can't find it anywhere. Lime Pickle is ok but it's no Mango Pickle.
     
  50. rowdyflat

    rowdyflat One of Us Ski Pass: Gold Ski Pass: Silver

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Messages:
    3,550
    Likes Received:
    4,852
    Location:
    Yackandandah NE Victoria
    Although it will prolly be bogan central that time of year ?
     
    Mister Tee on XC Skis likes this.