The Do's & Don'ts

Discussion in 'Snow Talk' started by lardarse, Jul 19, 2017.

  1. lardarse

    lardarse New Member

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    So as I learn there are a heap of things that I wouldn't have thought of to do & don't! Whats some of your best tips?

    So far:

    • Always try and make the lift full, i.e i'm usually single so i try and get on a 4 person chair with another 3 etc.
    • Try not to 'Plow' the ground (snowboard)
    • *Previously* Please don't buzz past me on a green run especially when I look like beginner (arms out stretched, all the safety gear, falling over every 10m) it scares the begeezes out of you!
    • Ski on the right colours, Im now on blue because I dont want to be the person above (freaking a real beginner out by whizzing past) and if you need to use the greens to get home, don't go flat out!
    • Tell the lifties if you are new! They are a great help getting on the lifts when learning to skate
    • be friendly to all the staff no matter what the que/food/bar is doing, im sure they would rather be skiing then working!
    • If you fall off and need a breather, make your way to the side ASAP! Don't sit in the middle of a run!
    • If you are good, and see a beginner fall hard, it never hurts to give a thumbs up *are you ok sign!
     
  2. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Part of the Furniture
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    Wikiski

    • If someone crashes and burns nearby ask if they are OK. In 99.99999% of cases they will be, but if they need the Ski Patrol, they need the patrol. If you need the patrol for yourself or someone else some resorts have a phone number on their trail map or lift ticket. Use your mobile. Otherwise, make sure you can describe where the accident is and send someone, or go yourself, to the top or bottom of the nearest lift. The lift operator will drop everything and call the patrol. If you see a patroller tell them. They all carry radios, and can call help in. When describing location think about using things like the trail name, above or below a trail intersection and the number of the nearest lift tower. The members of the Ski Patrol all have advanced first aid training. Some have para-medic skills, and if you are really lucky there are sometimes doctors on the Volunteer Patrol.
    • With skis, the conventional sign of an accident is crossed skis above the accident site. If you see this, keep well clear. If you are early at the accident site stick the crossed skis in the snow. It will warn other riders of the accident, and help the patrol find the accident.
    • If you are skiing or boarding in a group or class, always join the stationary part of the group by stopping BELOW everyone else. Particularly if you are a beginner, you cannot be sure that you will stop precisely where you think you will. If you stop below everyone else any imprecision will not result in your acting like a bowling ball and everyone else being involuntary pins.
    • This one is so bloody obvious that it should not rate a mention, but bitter experience says otherwise. If you are in a congested or crowded area, slow down and ensure that you are in TOTAL control. That means being able to stop or turn instantly. You may think you are cool if you ride fast in crowded areas, but I can promise you that everyone else who sees you thinks you are an intellectually challenged littledick. Some areas are marked with large 'SLOW' signs - ski patrol will often enforce these areas.
    • It seems obvious, but not everyone can work this one out. If you are approaching a lift line slow down or stop well uphill of the line. Approach the line slowly and in control. If you lose it near a lift line your targets cannot escape.
    • If any "expert" friends come up with the smart idea of taking you to an expert area before you are ready for it to "boost" your "confidence", tell them to expletive off. More people have been put off snowsports by this dumb theory than any other. You will be scared different expletiveless.
    • Be conscious of your ability, and do not ride on slopes too far beyond that ability. If you are completely out of your depth and struggling down a slope well beyond your skills you may be a danger to yourself and other riders. Plus it is no fun.
    • Be aware of your surroundings. Sight and hearing are important senses for working out what is around you. Be vigilant. An iPod at full volume denies you important information about what is happening in your immediate vicinity.
    • The rules for sailing races contain an overriding rule that it is every competitors' obligation to keep clear. That concept is not expressed in the Alpine Responsibility Code, but it is a damn fine approach to life. There is not much point being in hospital when you are in the right when you could be still sliding after making allowances for someone who was in the wrong. It is a bit like defensive driving. Assume that everyone around you is a microsecond away from doing the dumbest thing imaginable.
    • When you are overtaking a boarder, be aware that their visibility is very limited on their heel side. Either give them a wide berth, or overtake on their toe side where they can see you. It is always the responsibility of the uphill person to avoid people downhill. Yell what side you are on.
    • If you are overtaking someone who is turning erratically and unpredictably, wait until they have committed to a turn, and overtake them on the outside of the turn. It is pretty tough for a beginner (it will probably be a beginner) to flick back and get in your way. Of course, the Alpine Responsibility Code puts the onus on you to keep clear, however erratically the downhill skier or boarder is behaving.
    • Skis and boards do not have a reverse gear. Pass behind other riders, not in front.
    • Most uphill riders will (reasonably) assume that you will continue on roughly the same line when planning their route. If you do intend to radically change your line it is a good idea to make sure that you will not get into someone's path when you do. This is not a substitute for the overriding responsibility for the uphill rider to stay clear - it is just courtesy and a sensible plan to avoid injury.
    • On cat tracks and other narrow areas it is courteous to warn people that you are overtaking. This is usually done by saying "On your right (or left)" to indicate the side on which you intend to pass. Many skiers click their poles together behind their back as a warning that they are approaching someone.
    • Lift lines generally start with a few separate lines that merge to a final line close to the lift, with merge points along the way. At these merge points it is polite to alternate, with one group from each line zipping in behind someone from the other line.
    • Lifts work most efficiently if every chair or T-bar is full. If you are alone, shout "Single!" so that you can hook up with a group that does not have a full complement. If you are part of one of those groups invite a single along. Some resorts have dedicated singles lines that feed in to a late stage of the line process.
    • If you fall while riding a surface lift get off the lift track IMMEDIATELY. It is a lot of fun to lie around giggling, but everyone else on the lift is still coming, and the lift will not stop. If you are still on the track the people behind you have very few options. One of those options is to slide over the top of you.
    • You should get away from the unload point at the top of a lift IMMEDIATELY. Other people are still coming, and if you are in the unload area you may cause a collision or be hit by an uncontrolled T-bar.
    • If you are skiing or boarding in a pack think about where you stop so that you do not impede other skiers or boarders. 10 people standing or sitting on a narrow cat track, lift exit, trail merge or choke point is thoughtless and dangerous for you and those around you. Move on a bit, and wait in a more open area.
    • It is a good idea to take your pole straps off you wrist if skiing trees. If the basket hooks up on a stray branch only your pole will be left behind, not your arm.
    • If you are feeling nervous on a slope DO NOT remove your skis. Your boots are slippery, have no edges and give you no control. On skis you are able to traverse or sideslip to an area where you feel more comfortable. There is no shame in doing long traverses with a kick turn at the edges of a run. If you find yourself in uncompacted snow skis will keep you on the surface. Without skis you will sink into the snow, making movement very tiring. You will soon become wet, cold and exhausted.
    • If you do not know what a kick turn is, find out. It, and the snowplow, are the two basic survival turns on skis. With those two turns, traversing and sideslipping skills you can survive anywhere. A kick turn is a rock solid, super stable means of reversing direction on almost any slope, and on any slope you will encounter in a resort.
    • If you fall and start sliding try to twist your body so your feet are below your body. This makes it easier to dig skis or feet into the snow so you can stop or slow down. It also means that if you do hit something your feet will be hurt, not your head.
    • If you have fallen on ice, and are accelerating downhill and you can keep your presence of mind, slip your hands out of your pole straps, grasp the pole with both hands just above the basket and ram the tip into the snow. This will slow you down or stop you. This works on icy snow, and you are unlikely to be sliding in soft snow.
    • If you are in whiteout conditions visibility improves dramatically if you ski near a row of trees or other solid objects. Trees give contrast so you are able to assess the terrain properly. A whiteout happens when fog reduces contrast to the extent that you cannot tell where the snow ends and the air begins. In bad whiteout you sometimes cannot tell if you are moving or stationary. It is disconcerting, and can be dangerous if you cannot tell how steep the slope is. This contributor has skied off the edge of a 3 metre cornice in a white out. The first inkling of its existence was the rapid descent.
    • If you eject from your bindings in deep snow so that the ski is under the surface and not immediately visible your ski will almost certainly be just above or near the top of the impact crater. Use a pole or ski to chop downwards into the snow. Eventually you will hit the missing ski, which can then be dug out.
    • If you are unfamiliar with the way a lift works let the lift operator know. They will offer advice, and will be able to slow the lift down to make getting on and off less stressful. Lift operators will also slow the lift for children and for really small children will help them on and off the lift.
    • If you are jumping, scope your landing. Ideally you will have a spotter telling you whether your landing zone is clear. If you don't have a spotter you should make sure that, at some point in the exercise before you are airborne and at a time when you can still abort, you can see the whole of your proposed landing and outrun. IF YOU CAN'T SEE, DON'T JUMP. You can't change direction in the air. People, and particularly kids, stop in the darndest places. Often jumps are to the side of a run, and the sides of runs are where people stop.
    • The corollary of the previous tip is that when you stop at the side of a run have a quick look uphill for signs of jumping. A lip with tracks leading off it and/or with an area below it packed more than the surrounding snow is a pretty good indicator of a jump. As are random acts of carnage in the landing zone. If you see this leave the vicinity. Airborne madfolk may arrive at any time. In any event, you should not stop where there is not clear visibility from above. This means under lips, cat tracks or drop offs in terrain. Look uphill. If you cannot see the slope for a reasonable distance above you anyone coming down that slope cannot see you. If they can't see you they can't avoid you.
    • And, whatever you do, don't stop downhill from a jump in a terrain park. God put those things there for a reason and people WILL insist on jumping off them.
    • Try to make sure that the landing of your jump is on a slope. A sloping landing means that the terrain helps you absorb the impact of the landing gently as there is no sudden impact. Landing on the flat means that all the impact has to be absorbed in your legs. With a jump from any sort of decent height there is potential for serious injury here. Look at the landing hills for freestyle aerials and ski-jumping.
    • If you lose both skis in a fall, click into the downhill ski first. If you only lose one ski, turn around so the ski you are clicking back into is the uphill ski. In soft snow, standing on an uphill ski will mean that snow falls onto the downhill ski making it hard to click back in. Another trick is to drive the tails of your skiis into the snow at a slight angle so the binding is just above the snow level. You can then click into the binding without snow getting in the way.
    • When your skis do not release in a fall, and after you stop sliding, it is much easier to get back up if your skis are below your body and across the fall line. If your head is downhill do a sort of sideways forward roll to get your skis downhill. If your legs and skis are crossed in a some weird way, the easiest way to untangle is to lie on your back with your head uphill and lift your legs and skis into the air where you can easily untangle them.
    • Snow on the base of a boot means that bindings will not work properly. This usually means that your boot does not click in properly, and the ski will soon fall off again. Clean the base of the boot by whacking the sole with a pole, or scraping it across the binding.
    • If you fall in deep snow and your poles sink into the snow when you push to get back upright, try laying your poles flat on the snow in a cross. Push from the intersection of the poles. This may give you something solid enough to push against.
    • If someone has a garage sale fall, scattering gear all over the hill, pick up their gear and ski or board down to them with it. It is something that you hope will be done for you in equivalent circumstances. And she or he might be cute.
    • A lot of people are precious about preserving their top sheets (the top surface of skis or boards). In lift lines, try to avoid sliding skis or boards over the top of other people's skis or boards. It does not get you to the front of the line any faster, and will preserve peace in the line.
    • At the end of a great day, when your legs are feeling a little weary, it is tempting to have 'one last run'. This can be dangerous. You are far more likely to crash when the legs feel like jelly. If you are feeling tired, stop. You will get that well deserved beer a few minutes early and you will be around for first tracks the next day.
    • Skiers, your poles are lethal weapons. In lift lines and walking around make sure they are not sticking into anything but the snow. If you are carrying skis over your shoulder remember that you have a metre or so of ski projecting behind you. Do not swing around and whack innocent bystanders behind you.
    • If all else fails, and you are heading for an obstacle or person with no realistic chance of turning or stopping, fall over. You will do far less damage to yourself and others in a controlled fall.
     
  3. LMB

    LMB Old And Crusty
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    Some of those made me laugh @Legs Akimbo !

    * as a boarder I assume skiers behind me have no clue where my trajectory is (some do, many don't) - if I am likely to be passed I'll hold a tight line when I know they're coming. All the better to not be hit, then loosen up those turns when danger passes.

    * similarly if crossing to the other side of a run, or across converging runs etc I will scope a clear spot to move but clearly point with my hand on the side that I'm headed to indicate that I'm heading across the run. It helps less experienced skiers behind who will never catch me anyway not get spooked, and gives the hot guns ages back who are travelling at light speed yet scoping ahead the heads up of where I'll be by the time they want to pass me.

    * following on with legs white out cornice drop ---> poor vis and low light can get you also. Lot of painkillers needed to finish a trip in Zermatt after I didn't see a 1m drop to track below. You'll absorb those shocks easier the more experience you have - similar thing in Niseko this past Jan was only cause for a few laughs over a drink later on. If you can't see well...slow down.

    * if someone gives you a heads up "wouldn't stop there mate it's unsafe" the best response is "cheers, mate". Call him/her a ******** later if you wish but an automatic response of "f*** off" doesn't make you any new friends.

    * selfie sticks: time and place.
    Too many people filming their steeze and not watching where they are going. That's ok if it means you fall over. It's not ok if you hit or terrorise other skiers.

    * be nice to people. Chat on chairlifts, high five the junior shredders, shout your instructor a beer if you see them at the bar later - they're usually broke, and just really improved your snow experience for the rest of your life.
     
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  4. Cat_Herder

    Cat_Herder Active Member

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    To be honest I got irritated reading these - I thought they were just that obvious they didn't need to be said, but there you go...
     
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  5. W0nkey D0nkey

    W0nkey D0nkey Active Member

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    Im my case, if you don't go flat out, you won't make it home:D
     
  6. piolet

    piolet Old And Crusty
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    Less is moar
    Be excellent to each other
     
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  7. JoeKing

    JoeKing Part of the Furniture
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    A wise man once told me, try not to be a c word.
     
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  8. toomuchwork

    toomuchwork Just Registered

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    You're not the only one. Part of the "joy" of visiting Australia is all the people who make it their business to try and enforce all the rules and regulations - and their are plenty of rules and regulations - more and more each year. Having said that etiquette on the piste is pretty self evident.
     
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  9. LMB

    LMB Old And Crusty
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    The whole point was from the perspective of a new boarder. Things that weren't immediately known but became evident.
    Thread wasn't intended for you who have piste etiquette in your blood. You don't have to read it if you're not interested.
     
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  10. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Part of the Furniture
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    Which ones don't you do?

    And which ones haven't you seen?
     
  11. Billy_Buttons

    Billy_Buttons Dedicated Member
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    Ask the ski patrol and medical centre about out of control issues. :rolleyes:
     
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  12. bawbawbel

    bawbawbel Dedicated Member
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    Not real funny.
    More:
    Don't relax because you have reached the lift line. Your ACL is unbelievably vulnerable to an unexpected impact from the side.
    If you miss the moment to unload, don't jump. A trip wire will stop the lift.
    Last week a gal who was going wal had some ice fall on her helmet as she reached unload. Jumped late and cracked a rib on her pole. Gone home.
     
  13. dawooduck

    dawooduck Pool Room
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    Don't mind tables
    Do share tables
     
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  14. nfip

    nfip Part of the Furniture
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    Me too.
    Especially if the Westerly is howling up,the valley across Siberia.
     
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  15. Kangaroo

    Kangaroo Dedicated Member

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    If you're on that chair in front of me and you are smoking, you are a jerk.

    Ease off on the swearing in lift lines, nobody is impressed.

    Oh yes, don't ski Thredbo on a very windy day on a weekend. Unless of course you enjoy extreme queues.
     
  16. currawong

    currawong Old And Crusty
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    i didn't notice this in @Legs Akimbo 's list. it should be obvious but many people don't do it.

    if you are stopped, always check above you before starting off again (and give way to people already moving)
     
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  17. Sandy

    Sandy Dark Sith Lord of the Pool Room
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    If you are skiing/boarding towards a spot where you will be passing small children, slow right down and swing well clear. Children can do unexpected things, and even a small impact that would not hurt an adult, could do huge damage to a child.
     
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  18. shabu_shabu

    shabu_shabu Active Member

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    You are conflating two issues thereby making a strawman argument. Nobody is going to be fined or go to gaol for breaching these guidelines. At most, if you are unlucky to get caught by the ski patrol for being a genuine prat you might lose your ski pass.

    As others have said, as an experienced skier/boarder these are not meant for you. They are for the first timer and one weekend a year visitor. The fact that they have to be spelled out in such detail is probably indicative of the number of people who don't know them or follow them. And we all see plenty of evidence of that every time we go on the mountain.
     
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  19. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Part of the Furniture
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    That's in the Alpine Responsibility Code, so I didn't include it. My list was intended to be suggestions, not prescriptive. But if everyone followed it (including a lot of experienced riders who don't) life on the slopes would be a lot more pleasant.
     
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  20. Cat_Herder

    Cat_Herder Active Member

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    I'm not going to say I'm a saint on the hill, but I would like to think I follow 95% of these 95% of the time.
    I definitely jump without checking landings, which I know isn't great, but sometimes it isn't practical/I feel that theres a 99% chance that there won't be anyone on the other side. At the end of the day though, everybody's up there to have fun, and like toomuchwork said, some people spend more time worrying about others behavior rather than enjoying themselves.

    In terms of which ones I haven't seen, well most of them, but like most people you'd hope you can use your general intelligence, logic and manners to know whether you're being an ass or not...
     
  21. climberman

    climberman CloudRide1000 Legend
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    the people that mind don't matter and
    the peple that matter don't mind
     
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  22. Tonester

    Tonester Dedicated Member
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    Here's a tip learnt the hard way: wear gloves....always. If it's warm, wear lighter weight gloves.
    I was out skinning up Little Twyman and was very hot. Took my super lightweight gloves off to cool off a little. I slipped, fell and braced my fall with my hand. Well, those snow and ice crystals are like little knives. I sliced up my hand quite nicely on the snow. Lesson learnt.
     
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  23. Tonester

    Tonester Dedicated Member
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    Learn lift queue etiquette
    Be courteous to all around you, but DO have the gumption to challenge an obvious queue jumper. Especially those using the ski school line.
     
  24. telecrag

    telecrag Part of the Furniture
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    But I like passing boarders on their blind side, just so they know they have it!
     
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  25. climberman

    climberman CloudRide1000 Legend
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    It's the yelling "Boo!!" at them and donking their helmet with your stick that really makes you such a meany.
     
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  26. telecrag

    telecrag Part of the Furniture
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    You have to be careful how close you go, one of them almost landed on my pole when it fell over!
     
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  27. W0nkey D0nkey

    W0nkey D0nkey Active Member

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    Don't get too close but still spray em.
     
  28. LMB

    LMB Old And Crusty
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    Being someone who actually hates confrontation I very rarely do that.
    But if I see someone coming through the queue behind me and being pushy and rude (with no decent reason like a child separated from a parent) then I'll close the gap intentionally - sometimes just a few words or eye movements to those you're with will form a wall, and if they try to push past that wall then I speak up.
    Ha!! You wish!!
     
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  29. telecrag

    telecrag Part of the Furniture
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    I think it was a male of the species!
     
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  30. piolet

    piolet Old And Crusty
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    Get some support around you first "can you believe this guy" etc then sledge em
     
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  31. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Part of the Furniture
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    I would have put a lot of money on this. Your theory seems to be that if you jump 100 times it is OK if you hit one person.
     
  32. skichanger

    skichanger Dedicated Member
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    Eek! jumping without checking is a complete no no! I know of numerous serious injuries, including life threatening brain injuries, to the person who was hit by the jumper. Might be clear 99% of the time but you just need that 1% to happen for it all to go wrong.
     
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  33. LMB

    LMB Old And Crusty
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    And it's not just hurting other people. Girl I know didn't scope landing, was not was she was expecting and broke her back.

    Also worth a slow and aware pass through side/back country area even if you know it before bombing through - glide cracks can have nasty consequences.
     
  34. dawooduck

    dawooduck Pool Room
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    Some people are so intent on maintaining their personally decided lift queue placement that .... they miss the lift.

    Only one reason to be in a lift queue ..... to get on the lift ..... while ya minding I will be sliding ..... bye.

    IMHO there should be separate queues for side sliders so they can all queue sideways in happy mutual sideways land
     
  35. JoeKing

    JoeKing Part of the Furniture
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    LOL
     
  36. LMB

    LMB Old And Crusty
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    LOL

    I'm not talking about efficient lift movement here - you know the ones I'm talking about. Everyone else is patiently inching forward and that one or two decide queues are not for them. Duck a rope half way down, push past the little kid, laugh when someone says 'excuse me!!?' - I'm gonna block ya while I make my way into the lift ahead of ya! Be warned Duckie ;)

    Separate queues for boarders?
    Genius!!
    Skiers in one queue, boarders in the other, turn by turn - I'll never get a stock jammed into my boot again :D
     
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  37. Billy_Buttons

    Billy_Buttons Dedicated Member
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    I haven't heard them called stocks since the 70s, that's great! :)
     
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  38. Cat_Herder

    Cat_Herder Active Member

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    That I would be the type of person to apparently disregard other people for my own fun? Fair enough, start an argument based on my wording... When I'm jumping, this isn't like side hits and airs down the sides of mount P where there is a large chance that people will be there, this is in places where people ski much less, and the people who are skiing there would be smart enough to notice where people are jumping, so despite my apparent negligence, I make an informed choice, and would take full responsibility if I did injure someone.
     
  39. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Part of the Furniture
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    I'm sure that, when they are in their wheelchairs, they will feel much better knowing that you have taken "full responsibility".

    Would you donate a kidney? Would you devote the rest of your life to caring for the victim? What do you think "full responsibility" means, apart from weasel words?
     
    #39 Legs Akimbo, Jul 20, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2017
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  40. Cat_Herder

    Cat_Herder Active Member

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    Okay mate, a few statistics:
    • 3% of total injuries sustained skiing are off piste
    • 72% of injuries sustained are on piste
    • 3-8% of injuries occur due to a collision with another person
    Doing some simple maths, criticise it as you feel appropriate, but that means there is around a 0.0009% chance that an injury sustained will be because of me jumping, and a 0.06% chance and injury sustained will be because of you skiing down front valley with your probably Sydney private schooled kids. That means your about 70 times more likely to injure someone than me just based on this scenario. Now tell me, what would you say if you put someone in a wheelchair... "I'm awfully sorry, but you knew the inherent risks of skiing"? I don't know, but I'm not too grateful for making it seem like I don't care about the welfare of others. While I sometimes don't check, I am confident that there is nobody on the other side, considering in a day I never see anyone on the same run, while obviously isn't perfect, but to stop, check, walk back up, then jump, I think we can agree that that isn't fun. Obviously if I'm going to jump in a terrain park, or somewhere where there is a chance there is someone, I'll get someone to check. To throw a blanket over every jump I do and say I'm going to put someone in a hospital bed half the time isn't cool, and is nowhere remotely accurate, or fair to say. The day I put you in a hospital bed because you stopped below an obvious jump or drop, I will happily give you my kidney if that's what's necessary.
     
  41. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Part of the Furniture
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    That's fine. When you injure someone what does "full responsibility" mean?
     
  42. Cat_Herder

    Cat_Herder Active Member

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    Well mate I thought it was pretty self explanatory, so why don't you tell me what you would expect from "full responsibility".
     
  43. Kletterer

    Kletterer Addicted Member
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    If you cant see your landing you need a spotter- no exceptions.
     
  44. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Part of the Furniture
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    I would expect you to devote the rest of your life to caring for whomever you injure. That is full, and responsible.

    But you used the words - what did you mean?
     
  45. Cat_Herder

    Cat_Herder Active Member

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    So for some perspective, when you're speeding and overtaking on a double line in your Audi on the way to the snow, and you have a crash and leave someone a quadraplegic, is that better or worse? Would you devote the rest of the life to them or would that just be covered in your settlement? Or are you too good and respectable in the first place to drive like that on the highway?
     
  46. Kletterer

    Kletterer Addicted Member
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    So whats the plan if a patroler sees you do it and decides to pull your pass ?
     
  47. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Part of the Furniture
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    I just want you to explain what you meant by "full responsibility". It seems to be something less than "full" or "responsible".
     
  48. Kelpieboy

    Kelpieboy Dedicated Member

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    Stupid argument really................doesn't matter who you are or where you are...................

    this statement is (sic) exactly correct always has been and always should be.
     
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  49. Charlie

    Charlie Still the most depraved poster here
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    I find a pole stuck in the snow neatly between their skis works a treat, and if you do it properly, it looks like it was unintentional!
     
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  50. Snowfi

    Snowfi Active Member
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    I walked most of Breckenridge asking for kids stocks before some young thing corrected me... was 5 years ago, felt so old!

    Perisher the other day, during school holidays at the quad, someone yelled "Boo Hiss Queue Jumper" (yes those words, not the sounds) everyone in front became aware and closed ranks. He still got a bit ahead but oh he coped an earful from some. Not a young bloke either.

    I've stopped in the wrong place and done silly things without realising but I also go out of my way to help others.

    The no headphones is a biggy to me right now. Last week a kid was quite literally stuck in a tree off Zalis. Couldn't be seen from above. Someone heard him calling for help.
     
    SkiMountaineer likes this.