Thredbo Non-ski reports stuff

AWJ

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Saw this article elsewhere and thought it deserves its own thread:
Thredbo, Perisher open in a season like no other amid pandemic, unpredictable snow conditions
Peter Brewer

The Thredboland centre is shuttered, chairs and tables are piled and taped off in the once-busy eateries and over at Perisher, everyone is told to wear a mask of some kind.

Down at the NSW ski resorts this year, it's a very different kind of snow experience.

Visitor numbers to Perisher and Thredbo are running at an estimated 40 per cent capacity this year but slowly ramping up as more terrain is opened to skiers and boarders.

Nature has been modest in its snow offerings this deep into the season but there's a measured promise of more to come.

And Australian skiers and boarders are nothing if not "glass half-full" types, hopeful that should the NSW COVID-19 outbreaks stay under control and winter brings more storms, the back end to the season will be a good one.

For Thredbo's general manager Stuart Diver, the sole survivor of the resort's 1997 landslide disaster, this snow season has been one in which simply opening the doors and having the lifts turning was a huge relief.

At the height of the coronavirus pandemic in March/April and the Ruby Princess passenger debacle with NSW cases spiking and travel restrictions in place across the state, he feared the absolute worst.

"For a while there, I honestly thought we wouldn't have a season at all this year; complete zero chance," he admitted.

"Like so many businesses, we just had to watch and wait."

It's now often forgotten now but back in early January, Thredbo and Perisher were both evacuated of all but essential personnel at the height of the summer bushfire threat.

The threat to those two resorts was averted but just over the nearby mountains, Selwyn Snow Resort was smashed by the bushfires and lost all its critical infrastructure, including its power supply. It has been unable to open at all for season 2020.

Down in Victoria, the two "sister" resorts to Perisher also owned and operated by the US consortium Vail Resorts Management Company, Falls Creek and Mt Hotham, have been closed since July 9 and will stay that way to "at least 19 August, consistent with the current stay-at-home directions for metropolitan Melbourne", according to management.

When the green light finally came from the NSW government for the two major resorts to cautiously open their ticket sales online in early June, the massive response from the skiing and snowboarding public overwhelmed and crashed the servers, causing hours and hours of delays or in many cases, just timed people out of the system.

Hundreds of frustrated customers jumped on social media and were openly hostile toward the resort owners. Some were very personal and vitriolic in their attacks on Stuart Diver despite his profuse public apologies about the technology failure.

"I think situations such as that brought out the best and the worst in people," he said.

"This has been a season like no other.

"I felt very sorry that people couldn't get on the system, or couldn't the lift tickets on the days they wanted, or that they had pre-booked accommodation for the school holidays and couldn't get tickets for those days; all that, I understood completely.

"Some of the staff here were in tears.

"They saw the things being said about me on social media and honestly while it [the attacks] didn't worry me personally, the staff knew how hard we had worked as a team to make this season happen."

Thredbo, through its owner Event Hospitality and Entertainment, had invested $15 million over the summer in building Australia's first alpine gondola; a high speed, eight-person enclosed ride to the top of Merritt's spur to replace a double chairlift.

It was by far the most significant infrastructure investment made by either resort for many years, and recouping that investment is now going to take much longer than expected.

One of the most difficult decision Mr Diver had to make was to operate a level playing field on ticket sales.

Season's pass holders, which provide so much important early season revenue for the resort, were given the option of either accepting a refund or hanging in to see what may develop as the season progresses..

Season's pass holders initially weren't given unlimited access nor guaranteed lift tickets on the days they want them, although as of July 18, that restriction has been lifted for Perisher.

At Thredbo, season's pass holders still have to apply for the days they want through a dedicated online request channel, although the broader opening of the mountain now means fewer people are missing out on their requested days.

Mr Diver said that despite all the early difficulties, Thredbo was aiming to break even this season financially.

"We had mapped out three basic scenarios for operating during this pandemic: one was not operating at all, the second was to operate in a reduced way as we are now and gradually opening more areas up, offering more tickets and allowing people to spread out on the mountain more as and when we can, and the third was to be fully open," he said.

"To be honest, I can't see the third option being a reality this year.

"We are planning now for next season; we have to. And that's going to be another different season, too because there are so many unknowns still in how this pandemic will play out."

Meanwhile, the big ski resorts across Canada and the US are now watching the Australian experience closely, looking for some guidance as to how to best manage guest numbers over their forthcoming winter season.

"Jackson Hole [in Wyoming] have been in contact with us already; they've watched how we have managed this situation and are looking to do something similar," he said.

"But gee, if you look at how the [pandemic] numbers have spiked in the US, there must be a lot of concerned operators over there now."

There was plenty of posturing in the main thread at the start of the season about KT's finances - looks like even with the delayed opening, and subsequent shit season and reduced numbers due to covid restrictions, they're still expecting to break even.

Also, wonder what they'll do re 365 passes for the coming 12 months?

Will they be offered at all? Maybe they will offer them, but maintain a reservation system so you still have to book ya days in advance?

I'm hoping they offer them, and they also do something similar to when they 1st came about a decade ago and if you buy a 20/21 365 pass, it is also able to be used for the tail end of this season in September...

If they don't offer them, Summer business could take a big hit
 

Annabuzzy

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Interesting they expect to break even, but given their comfortable profits even in a normal bad year, not a huge surprise
 
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linked_recoveries

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Not a lot of interest being paid on anything these days. The Reserve Bank continues to set the cash rate at 0.25%. Term deposits at CBA are 0.4%, 0.5%, 0.7% and 0.8% as you give them your money for longer terms. All of that is below the rate of inflation, and you get taxed on it, so you're effectively going backwards.
 
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Bogong

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Question from an uneducated VIC skier.
Who owns/runs Thredbo? :nerd:
Thredbo lifts are owned by Event Holdings who also own a bunch of hotels, cinemas and other stuff in the entertainment industry.

The situation for management of the resort is rather strange. There is no Resort Management Board like they have at ski resorts in "Mexico" and many overseas resorts. Rather the lift company also runs most of the operations at the resort as well and acts rather like an RMB, with NSW Parks & Wildlife having a degree of supervisory oversight, because, rather strangely, Thredbo is technically inside a national park, even if it is otherwise run like a conventional ski resort.
 

rugbyskier

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There is a single lease covering the village and the slopes, and the lessee is Kosciuszko Thredbo Pty Ltd, a wholly owned subsidiary of ASX listed company Event Hospitality and Entertainment Limited. All lodges, apartments and houses in the village have a sublease with KT who, as Bogong points out, provides municipal services to the village in addition to lift and resort operations.
 

telecrag

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From what I understand, KT looked after their major stakeholders, over season sliders. I think that was smart, though it burnt me in a way. I doubt anyone has gotten, or needed, a discount on their fees? KT must make a fair chunk of rev out of the sublessor. I would still be surprised if they do actually "break even" this year. But I would expect the loss will not be great.

I doubt I will be in a position to buy a 365 next season if they do come up, but hopefully the one after.
 

fenrir

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Judging by how quickly tickets have sold out KT may be emboldened by how willingly the punters lapped up whatever shit was served to them and not offer season passes next year at all?
 

Laska Goralska

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Judging by how quickly tickets have sold out KT may be emboldened by how willingly the punters lapped up whatever shit was served to them and not offer season passes next year at all?

As a lapper of shit in 2020 I'll likely lap up whatever's served in 2021, but hopefully season passes are on. What's the worst that could happen? Same as this year and they need to build some crappy work around to ration tickets for punters while providing a side door for season pass holders I assume.
 

db2567

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Judging by how quickly tickets have sold out KT may be emboldened by how willingly the punters lapped up whatever shit was served to them and not offer season passes next year at all?
Spoke with guest services yesterday and they said they would love to offer season passes in time for summer but they said it is still up in the air.
 

sastrugi

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Ah, that makes sense. I thought Amalgamated owned Thredbo, but see they morphed into Event (I think they were originally a building/construction company who developed Thredbo???).
LendLease were the original building/construction company who developed Thredbo. Can't remember when/how the changeover took place. It was quite a while ago though, AHL had Thredbo when I moved there very early 90s.
 

skull

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may be emboldened by how willingly the punters lapped up
I am willing to take it for 2020, but if they pull something similar for 2021 I will take advantage of the military epic pass and go back to perisher.
 

fenrir

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As a lapper of shit in 2020 I'll likely lap up whatever's served in 2021, but hopefully season passes are on. What's the worst that could happen? Same as this year and they need to build some crappy work around to ration tickets for punters while providing a side door for season pass holders I assume.
I'd be poring over those terms and conditions with a fine tooth comb to confirm that it is how they would handle the situation.

Not that the current T&C meant much as there was a clause in there for "whatever we want".
 

Laska Goralska

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I'd be poring over those terms and conditions with a fine tooth comb to confirm that it is how they would handle the situation.

Not that the current T&C meant much as there was a clause in there for "whatever we want".

Yep, basically the terms and conditions have a shit eating clause in them. but, if they're flogging a season pass for next year I'll buy it, shit eating clause or not.
 
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AWJ

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From the other thread, a bit of old info about thredbo's lease:

https://www.smh.com.au/national/thredbo-goldmine-at-8000-a-year-20040120-gdi6y5.html
Thredbo goldmine - at $8000 a year
One of Australia's biggest companies has been allowed to rent the Thredbo ski and summer tourist resort from taxpayers for as little as $8000 a year, while last year reporting a turnover of more than $36.6 million.

A confidential state cabinet minute reveals the deal, amid plans to renew the lease for a further 50 years, under similar terms and conditions.

The 11-hectare village and about 940 hectares of surrounding public parkland is being leased by Kosciusko Thredbo, under a 45-year deal that is due for renewal in 2007.

The company then sub-leases the land to hundreds of businesses and ski-lodge owners. It also runs chairlifts, ski slopes and other enterprises on the land.

Kosciusko Thredbo is a subsidiary of the stockmarket-listed Amalgamated Holdings, whose other interests include the Greater Union cinema chain. It also owns the Rydges chain of hotels, one of which is in the alpine resort.

The company denied that it was paying $8000 a year for the land but declined to provide an alternative figure.

Garry Huggett, Kosciusko Thredbo's property and development manager, said the annual rent was the greater of either $8000 or 5 per cent of the company's taxable income.

"We pay a percentage based on our revenues," Mr Huggett said. "If we have a good year, the government has a good year. If we have a bad year, we cry, but the government probably missed out a bit, too. It is based on our profit.

"There is a minimum of $8000 a year. And we have paid considerably more than the minimum amount for many years. For many, many years."

But the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) said taxpayers had received the minimum rent under the terms of the lease for seven of the past 14 rental years.

The cabinet minute also indicates that $8000 a year was "generally" what taxpayers had received since the lease was first signed in 1962.

Before being sold to Amalgamated Holdings for about $18 million in December 1986, the lease was held by the property developer Lend Lease.

The NPWS said that sometimes the rent payments were higher than $8000 but the total amount collected under the lease over the past 14 years was less than $2.5 million.

By comparison, taxpayers collected nearly $3 million alone last year from the nearby Perisher ski resort, which is sub-leased directly by the State Government, says the service.

"From the Government's perspective we would very much like to secure more leasing revenue from Kosciusko Thredbo," said Simon Lyas, manager of the resorts division of the state's NPWS.

"Because, let's face it, they have had a pretty good break as far as their rent is concerned all these decades. I am not criticising the system, all I am saying is that is a fact."

A spokesman for the Environment Minister, Bob Debus, confirmed the rental returns but said there was little the Government could do.

"Over the years legal advice has been provided to the Government by numerous QCs - as recently as mid-2003 - that there is little or no possibility of changing the base rent [Kosciusko Thredbo] currently pays in any renewed lease beyond 2007," he said.

The cabinet minute, obtained by the Herald, says that the Government wanted to impose a ski-lift tax in 1997 partly out of frustration with the terms of the lease.

The proposal for the tax - rebatable against any lease rental paid to the NPWS - was dropped after the Thredbo landslide disaster of the same year.

 

AWJ

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https://www.smh.com.au/national/the-lease-is-king-20040120-gdi6x6.html
The lease is king
Thredbo may be one of our largest and most popular ski resorts , but it has not always been a licence to make a profit.

The first syndicate set up in the late-1950s to establish a European-style holiday destination quickly ran into difficulties and it sold the dream to the property development company Lend Lease.

Lend Lease then brokered a deal on advantageous terms that NSW taxpayers may continue to endure until mid-century.

In 1962, the Heffron Labor government entered a 45-year rental agreement that allowed Lend Lease to take over the existing hotel and lodges, and also to run the village, effectively acting as a local council. The company has an option to renew the lease in June 2007, under the same terms, for another 50 years.

Under the agreement, all new development was structured through Lend Lease and anyone who wanted to build a ski lodge or operate a business had to enter into a sub-leasing arrangement.

Businesses and property owners also had to pay an annual rate for services such as water, sewage and road maintenance.

For its part, the Government received either 5 per cent of the annual taxable income of the Kosciusko Thredbo company - then a subsidiary of Lend Lease - or a series of minimum annual payments (which started at £2000 and rose to £4000 by 1966).

The Government would get the greater of the two figures, an arrangement that continued when Amalgamated Holdings paid Lend Lease about $18 million for the lease in December 1986.

According to the National Parks and Wildlife Service, the lease greatly favoured its holder.

"If I were . . . in their management team I would be very pleased with this lease," said Simon Lyas, the manager of the service's resorts division.

"Obviously it's financially in the company's favour compared with other leases and fees we collect elsewhere. So I can understand their perspective on this - which is obviously that they don't want to change it."

Today Thredbo is a 4300-bed development, with its own hotel, restaurants, supermarket and a range of retail premises. It has a nine-hole golf course, a range of ski lifts and an annual turnover of about $36 million.

The company has the right to another 510 bed spaces; with each currently valued at about $32,000, that asset alone is worth more than $16 million.

A developer that wanted, for instance, to build a four-bed chalet in the latest Thredbo project would first have to pay $128,000 to Kosciusko Thredbo, a wholely owned subsidiary of Amalgamated Holdings.

That enterprise is responsible for water, sewage and telephone connections; but all other building and maintenance costs are bourne by the sub-lessee. An annual maintenance fee of about $830 a bed is also charged, which the company said goes to road maintenance and other services.

Johnny Kahlbetzer, whose family has held a sub-lease over the 14-bed Twynam lodge since 1966, said taxpayers were not getting a fair return - and neither were sub-leaseholders.

Last year he paid more than $11,000 in fees - "I would happily pay twice as much as that to a local council because that would give me the right to appeal decisions. As it is, the company dictates the terms and conditions . . . None of the normal rights and legislation that protect communities applies."

Almost all of the capital risk was carried by the sub-lessees, Mr Kahlbetzer said; but they had no right to appeal decisions denying, for instance, the right to build a bar at their premises.

"There is at least a $200 million investment by the sub-lessees in Thredbo," he said. "Kosciusko Thredbo doesn't have anything near that kind of investment."

However, Garry Huggett, Kosciusko Thredbo's property and development manager, defended the leasing arrangements.

"We don't want bars spread throughout Thredbo: we want the bars concentrated in the middle of the village so that . . . they can be managed better," he said.

"My personal feeling is that if we didn't have the retail strategy, every shop in Thredbo would be a clothing shop or a restaurant. You wouldn't get a hairdresser, a newsagent or a supermarket."

Mr Huggett also scoffed at a confidential government report suggesting that taxpayers generally received only $8000 a year for the village lease.

"You should give us a copy so that we can write to our landlord and say that they have incorrect advice," he said.
 

AWJ

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https://www.smh.com.au/national/thredbo-lease-rage-snowballs-20040121-gdi76i.html
Thredbo lease rage snowballs

The State Government will seek fresh legal advice over a lease that allows one of Australia's biggest companies to rent the Thredbo tourist resort from taxpayers for as little as $8000 a year, while last year reporting turnover of more than $36.6 million.

The move follows criticism from the Opposition and a conservation group after the terms of the lease were revealed in the Herald yesterday.

The Environment Minister, Bob Debus, said he would explore all legal options "with a view to getting a better deal for NSW taxpayers" out of the lease, which is due for renewal in 2007.

The 11-hectare village and about 940 hectares of surrounding public parkland is being rented by Kosciusko Thredbo under a deal in which it pays the greater of either $8000 or 5 per cent of annual taxable income.

The National Parks and Wildlife Service said that for seven of the past 14 years the figure had been $8000.

Kosciusko Thredbo sub-leases the land to hundreds of businesses and ski-lodge owners and has the option to extend the deal, under the same terms, for another 50 years. It also runs chairlifts, ski slopes and other enterprises on the land.

The company is a subsidiary of the stockmarket-listed Amalgamated Holdings, whose other interests include the Greater Union cinema chain. It also owns the Rydges chain of hotels, one of which is in the alpine resort.

The acting Opposition Leader, Andrew Stoner, said the Government needed to move heaven and earth to renegotiate the deal.

"Thredbo village is the crown jewel in the National Parks estate, and the taxpayers of NSW deserve a far better return than as little as $8000 year. Amalgamated Holdings is laughing all the way to the bank . . . This is big business taking advantage of the weakest lease agreement you'll ever see."

The Opposition environment spokesman, Michael Richardson, called the rent "ridiculously low".

"I don't think the lease should just be allowed to run, as is, for another 50 years. I think it needs to be brought into the 21st century, quite frankly.".

The National Parks Association of NSW said the lease was scandalous and called for special legislation to reverse it.

"Thredbo is a massive drain on the park's budget, and the owner of the company that holds the lease . . . effectively has a licence to print money," said its executive officer, Andrew Cox.

"Since the Thredbo lease was issued in 1962, successive state governments have supported increased development for virtually no financial return."

Mr Cox said the fragile sub-alpine environment had been put in danger at Thredbo.

"The Government should move quickly and use every measure at its disposal to remedy the shortcomings of this and all other leases in NSW national parks.

"If the leases cannot be revised, special legislation overturning lease conditions and claiming back future development options should be passed."
 

AWJ

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https://www.smh.com.au/national/mountain-deal-thredbo-rent-by-cold-war-20070303-gdpl8x.html
Mountain deal: Thredbo rent by cold war
IT HAS BEEN raining steadily at Thredbo this week, enough to bring a fragile green tinge to the slopes below empty ski-lifts as the town goes through its annual summer paint job.

But the rusted tin roof above the offices of Kosciuszko Thredbo Pty Ltd is perhaps a better indication that all is not well at Australia's premier ski resort.

For the first time in 45 years the lease for the sprawling ski-fields is up for renewal and company officials are negotiating with the State Government to enforce a clause under which they can take another 50 years for the same rent of a minimum of $8000 a year - a deal government officials describe as generous but that they admit they can do nothing to stop.

But a much more complicated battle is also consuming the attention of KT and its parent company Amalgamated Holdings - how much their tenants will pay to run the lodges, chalets, restaurants, bars and stores in town and, therefore, the cost of a skiing holiday at Thredbo.

The heated negotiations have exposed claims by business owners of pressure tactics being used against them by the company. KT is being accused of running a company town where the landlord not only collects the rent and sets the trading conditions but also competes with its own tenants - all inside a national park owned by the public. Owners of accommodation say they have been told that bed rates are going up as much as 30 per cent, whether they are in an old timber lodge or a multimillion-dollar stone house on Crackenback Ridge - costs that will inevitably be passed on to holiday-makers. Businesses will be forced to sign new leases that arbitrarily value their operations on the same basis as Hamilton Island in the Whitsundays, even though they can make money only between July and September. Those increases, too, will find their way onto meal bills and price tags.

The row has also exposed allegations that bed numbers are frequently being rorted to exceed the strict limits imposed by the National Parks and Wildlife Service. Some say that hundreds of extra beds are rented during the season, making a mockery of the limit of 4850 in the village.

Few tenants will talk openly about the matter but a number have signed a letter of complaint to the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission and the Australian Securities and Investments Commission asking for an investigation into KP's conduct. The office of Gary Nairn, the federal MP for Eden-Monaro, confirmed yesterday he had passed the complaint to the two agencies.

Behind closed doors business people complain of pressure tactics by a company that is prepared to ban a kiosk from selling hot dogs, a general store from selling fishing rods and a clothing store from selling hats and gloves, all of which compete with the company's own shops. It not only means the tenants cannot make a living but that holiday-makers pay exorbitant prices.

"They run the booking centre so they push people into their own lodges; they run the information centre where the only products advertised are their own; they run the ski-lifts which belong in a museum and they have a monopoly on selling alcohol. It's impossible," one said.

Two years ago the ski store Larry Adler retreated to Jindabyne, 30 kilometres away, because the rent was suddenly doubled by KT, which was running a competing ski-hire business.

The store's general manager, Nanette Adler, confirmed the story yesterday but is reluctant to discuss the issue. All she will say is: "We felt we were pushed out after being a model tenant for 11 years simply because we were a threat to their business."

Johnny Kahlbetzer, whose family has owned a ski lodge since the mid-1960s, says the town should be run by an independent council rather than a private company.

"It's a fiefdom. The company does what it wants and there are no checks and balances. They compete against everyone. We should be run by a council like any other town."

Mr Kahlbetzer said it was common knowledge that bed numbers were being exceeded and openly leased through management agents. "I don't know why National Parks doesn't do something about it."

The group managing director of Amalgamated Holdings, David Seargeant, would not respond to the allegations. Neither would he discuss the head lease negotiations, and he insisted the company had not even begun to negotiate with sub-lessees.

"It is not appropriate to comment at this stage," he said.

"We haven't begun negotiations; we have just asked them if they intend to continue. I can't go any further."

The terms of the head lease say that KT pays a minimum $8000 or 5 per cent of the company's taxable income, whichever is the greater.

Taxpayers had "generally" received the minimum since the lease was signed in 1962, according to a cabinet minute cited by the Herald three years ago.

Since then the company had paid an average $600,000, a fraction of the $3 million raised each year from the neighbouring Perisher resort.

The head of the National Parks and Wildlife Service, Tony Fleming, said yesterday the lease was generous, but that his hands were tied. He would not discuss the detail of the new agreement until it had been finalised by the Government, but insisted that legal advice was unequivocal.

"No doubt it is a generous agreement, but it was signed at a time when the Government of the day was desperately trying to encourage the development of a ski resort in NSW.

"Our legal advice makes it clear that the company was exercising an option on similar terms. We can't change that, but we can negotiate in some areas. We'd like to see some reforms, important provisions in a plan of management."

As to the battle between KT and the sub-lessees, Dr Fleming said the Government had no right to intervene.

"That's between the company and its tenants."
 

climberman

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None of that is news though.
They have a lease.
The lease has terms.
They wish(ed) to continue in with that lease under the terms provided by the lease.
What struck me as weird is that someone thought they might be able to adjust the lease terms without some parlay.

Thredbo pays for road, sewer (they run a whole system and treatment plant), waste and telecoms. This is not a burden on government. As an indication of what a burden this element at Perisher is, we all pay (including a Customers!! Which I find galling and I imaging KT finds even more so) the additional day and annual park access fees specifically to cover this burden Perisher gives the State. Every Thredbo visitor helps run Perisher’s service utilities!
 

Aractus

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Exactly. @AWJ - what's your point? Do you want to own a resort? Turnover does not equal profit, and the customers the resorts bring are customers for the whole Snowy region townships.
 

Jacko4650

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What to do when you can't go shopping in the city - take a chairlift at Thredbo and walk to Mt Kosciusko! Might need crowd control ?
thredbo-kosciuszkotrack 29Dec20.jpg
 

LMB

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Queue for Kosi back down the stairs, and queue for tickets half way across the bridge according to friends in town today.

They also tell me our apartment is smashing and has wonderful views. Party house for winner apparently. Shame we haven’t seen it yet :headbang:
 
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skichic

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These people must be locals and from Canberra . Greater Sydney people are not supposed to be travelling
ROFLROFLROFL

Greater Sydney people are travelling all over the state. Only NB are legally restricted, but they’re still travelling all over the state, getting married, buying pizza....and in Thredbo.
 
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skull

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Queue for Kosi back down the stairs,
It was down the stairs and almost back to the main road on Tuesday
Greater Sydney people are travelling all over the state. Only NB are legally restricted
I think Canberra placed restrictions on greater Sydney, they had ACTpolice checking nsw played cars and off from Sydney ensuring they weren’t stopping
 
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skichic

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It was down the stairs and almost back to the main road on Tuesday

I think Canberra placed restrictions on greater Sydney, they had ACTpolice checking nsw played cars and off from Sydney ensuring they weren’t stopping
That’s just for the ACT. Sydney people are free to travel through NSW. Last I checked the ACT wasn’t part of NSW? ;)
 

Ozgirl

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It was down the stairs and almost back to the main road on Tuesday

I think Canberra placed restrictions on greater Sydney, they had ACTpolice checking nsw played cars and off from Sydney ensuring they weren’t stopping
There were check points on Christmas Eve. (At williamsdale) my parents went the back way from Michaelago so they didn't get delayed.

Apparently none yesterday - although I travelled through Queanbeyan.

But yes legally I was allowed to travel from Sydney to Jindabyne yesterday. Friends drove the 'Norman's way via Manjura/ Fyshwick

And my parents were allowed to travel to Sydney and back.

I am now here (jindy)for the long haul, as I am currently not allowed into the ACT (as a Sydney resident) and I still need access for ongoing medical appts. All winter I was asked if I hadn't been in SYD for 14 days.
 

climberman

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There is no current restriction of movement for NSW residents across NSW, excerpting Sydney’s Northern Beaches (which also has exclusions to the restrictions based on last date of time spent in the Northern Beaches).

There are increased limits in gatherings, etc for Greater Sydney (including Wollongong), but not of movement. For better or for worse as a Wollongong resident I can travel anywhere in NSW I want except the Northern Beaches.
 
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skichic

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There is no current restriction of movement for NSW residents across NSW, excerpting Sydney’s Northern Beaches (which also has exclusions to the restrictions based on last date of time spent in the Northern Beaches).

There are increased limits in gatherings, etc for Greater Sydney (including Wollongong), but not of movement. For better or for worse as a Wollongong resident I can travel anywhere in NSW I want except the Northern Beaches.
And as an ACT resident I can meet my Sydney based kids in Mittagong for lunch (and hugs) and then travel to any state in Australia. :rolleyes:
 
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