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Today's fact about Canada

Discussion in 'Canada' started by sly_karma, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. robbo mcs

    robbo mcs One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    With regards to the previous discussion about Halifax, The Barenaked ladies song “hello city” is a about their first trip to Halifax.
     
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  2. piolet

    piolet Better make it three Ski Pass: Gold

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  3. Edgecrusher

    Edgecrusher Pool Room Ski Pass: Gold

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    LOL :thumbs:
    I just can't help but think of Eugene Levy as Jim's dad in American Pie when I hear that track though
     
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  4. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Most iconic Canadian band that is barely known outside Canada: The Tragically Hip. The band formed in Kingston, Ontario in the mid 80s and stayed together without a lineup change for 33 years and 15 albums. Loved for the Canadian themes and locales referenced in their songs, the band toured extensively - more or less every summer. In May 2016, the band disclosed to the media that lead singer and principal songwriter Gord Downie had incurable brain cancer, followed by a further announcement that they would nonetheless tour that summer anyway. The Hip melted our hearts and the record books with an unforgettable 13-show sold out tour, with the final date in Kingston shown live on national TV, and attended in person by the PM. This fell on a Saturday night during the Rio summer Olympics, but demand for the farewell concert was so strong that CBC showed it live and ad-free, deferring olympic coverage for more than three hours. The TV audience was 11.7 million people - one third of the population of Canada.

    Downie gave numerous interviews and released a fifth solo album following the band's last tour. In June 2017, all five members of the band received the Order of Canada. Gord Downie died on October 17, 2017, aged 53; national mourning ensued. The band has since announced that the Tragically Hip will no longer tour or record new music, although there is reputed to be a lot of accumulated material recorded prior to Gord's death.
     
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  5. Summit

    Summit Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Harry Manx at Bluesfest last year was awesome, one of the best shows I've seen in recent years.
     
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  6. Fozzie Bear

    Fozzie Bear One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    Thread drift.... saw him a few years ago at a now defunct small venue in Newtown..... was excellent.
     
  7. Summit

    Summit Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    That's Ok, confirmation of another great non mainstream Canadian musician.
     
  8. aazz

    aazz One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    There is a documentary called Long Time Running on Netflix about The Tragically Hip. Well worth a look.
     
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  9. person s

    person s Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    the final episode of the Big Bang Theory finished with a slow acoustic version of the theme song - credit was still Barenaked persons
     
  10. person s

    person s Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    in fact ...

     
  11. piolet

    piolet Better make it three Ski Pass: Gold

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    Worst tv show ever
    Bazonga
     
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  12. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    We have a great little live music restaurant in town that has showcased Canadian indie talent for a quarter of a century. Harry Manx still plays there once a year or so. I've seen him be a grouchy old bugger at times, but always holds the room (120 people!) spellbound for his two one hour sets. Another wonderful Canadian blues musician who tours worldwide these days is Matt Andersen, look him up and see if you can go see him next time he's on the west side of the pond. He loves Australia.
     
  13. gareth_oau

    gareth_oau Pool Room Ski Pass: Gold

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    I'ma little surprised you rate Gogglebox higher?
     
  14. piolet

    piolet Better make it three Ski Pass: Gold

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  15. Summit

    Summit Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Yeah, Matt Andersen has played Bluesfest...big man big voice.
     
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  16. bomber

    bomber One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    This must have been frightening! The Frank Slide
    In the early morning hours of April 29, 1903, a freight train pulled out of the mine and was slowly making its way towards the townsite when the crew heard a deafening rumble behind them. The engineer instinctively set the throttle to full speed ahead and sped his train to safety across the bridge over the Crowsnest River.[9] At 4:10 am, 30 million cubic metres of limestone rock with a mass of 110 million tonnes (121 million US tons) broke off the peak of Turtle Mountain. The section that broke was 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) wide, 425 metres (1,394 ft) high and 150 metres (490 ft) deep.[1] Witnesses to the disaster claimed it took about 100 seconds for the slide to reach up the opposing hills, indicating the mass of rock traveled at a speed of about 112 kilometres per hour (70 mph).[10] The sound was heard as far away as Cochrane, over 200 kilometres (120 mi) north of Frank.
     
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  17. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Even larger than the Frank Slide - but considerably less deadly - was the 1965 slide near Hope, BC, which dislodged an estimated 47 million cubic metres of rock and killed four people. The slide covered Highway Three (the Hope-Princeton section) to a depth of 150 metres across a face two kilometres wide, completely obliterating a lake and permanently relocating a portion of the watershed between the Skagit and Fraser rivers. Today the highway crosses a portion of the slide debris and the slide face remains largely unvegetated and is very distinctive. There is a viewing area just off the highway with extensive information boards about the slide.
     
  18. Chalkie

    Chalkie One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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  19. The Plowking

    The Plowking Part of the Furniture Ski Pass: Gold

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  20. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    That picture clearly shows the remains of the old highway alignment. And if you look carefully to the left of the pin marker, there is a change of colour in the forest cover that indicates where the slide debris went up the opposite slope and destroyed all vegetation. To the left of the line is undisturbed original growth and the slightly lighter colour is regrowth cover. The passage of time has blurred the line at ground level as the new trees are almost up to the same size, but it was really noticeable for many years.
     
  21. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    One of the strangest weapons projects of WW2 took place in Canada. Patricia Lake, near Jasper, AB, was chosen as the site for construction of a scale model of a giant, indestructible aircraft carrier made of ice. This 'vessel' was intended to be positioned far offshore to provide air cover to convoys in the dangerous mid-Atlantic gap where land based aircraft could not reach. The research was known as Project Habakkuk and had the blessing of Adm. Lord Mountbatten and Churchill. The plan was to construct a manmade icefloe out of pykrete, a frozen water/wood pulp mixture, with the premise being that far less energy and resources were needed compared to steel or aluminium. The 'bergship' would have level surfaces for aircraft operations and a hull at least 12 m thick to make it invulnerable to torpedo attack.

    In the winter of 1942-43, the model version was constructed on the lake ice under the direction of the National Research Council of Canada. Various cooling ducts and tube coils were used to build a 60' x 30' vessel. Numerous technical problems arose and internal reports indicated that the full size bergship as envisaged by the Admiralty would have cost more than an entire fleet of conventional aircraft carriers. Production of escort carriers became more streamlined and patrol aircraft range continued to improve apace, resulting in the closure of the Atlantic Gap and rendering the man made ice floe unnecessary. The mechanical portions of the scale model sank to the bottom of the lake and remain there to this day.
     
  22. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Grumblebum Ski Pass: Gold

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    Then they invaded Greenland.
     
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  23. gareth_oau

    gareth_oau Pool Room Ski Pass: Gold

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    That’s a bizarre fact you should be keeping to yourself LOL
     
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  24. The Plowking

    The Plowking Part of the Furniture Ski Pass: Gold

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    Seems ridiculous alright!
     
  25. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Hard to believe it received sponsorship from the top leadership like Churchill and Mountbatten. Pyle's sales skills must have been all time.
     
  26. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    That never happened (although they wanted to), because the Americans - in the isolationist pre Pearl Harbour days - pre-empted a British/Canadian invasion by making Greenland a US protectorate. Then the US entered the war and Greenland hosted US air bases and personnel, a vital stop on the route for warplanes being ferried to Britain.

    Of more interest is the ongoing story of Canada and Greenland's dispute over tiny Han Island, far above the arctic circle and icebound most of the year. It happens to exactly straddle the centerline of the strait separating the two neighbours and remains the subject of a longstanding but good natured border dispute. Every few years, an expedition in the area will go out of its way to plant its national flag along with a bottle of spirits: schnapps by the Danes, and Canadian Club from the Canadians of course.
     
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  27. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    A major disappointment for Canadian engineers became a significant gain for the NASA space program. In 1959, Avro Canada abruptly cancelled its "Arrow" supersonic jet fighter program despite having four production aircraft in flight test and an upgraded Mk II aircraft at taxi testing. PM John Diefenbaker ordered the project halted due to cost concerns and a switch of focus to joining the US missile defense system. Meantime, NASA sorely needed aeronautical engineers for its nascent space program, and recruited 35 Canadians from the Avro aftermath - a significant influx of talent considering they only had 100 engineers at the time. The Canadians were immediately given green cards (permanent resident status), and many of them went on to become leading players in the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo projects.
     
  28. Beerman

    Beerman One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    I read about one of those Aeronautical Engineers while waiting at Kamloops airport in April, There is a bit of signage for visitors to read. Can't remember his name, but a Kamloops born and bred guy before joining the Canadian Air force and going on to a degree in Aeronautical Engineering...............
     
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  29. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Canada has a longstanding tradition of delivering comedians to the world stage. It could be the climate, the vast distances or the classic outsider attitude vis a vis the dominant US culture, but the list of northerners in high profile comedy is long. A small selection:
    • Dan Aykroyd
    • Will Arnett
    • Samantha Bee
    • John Candy
    • Tommy Chong
    • Jim Carrey
    • Gerry Dee
    • Michael J Fox
    • Tom Green
    • Phil Hartman
    • Eugene Levy
    • Rich Little
    • Howie Mandel
    • Rick Mercer
    • Lorne Michaels (creator/producer of SNL)
    • Rick Moranis
    • Mike Myers
    • Leslie Nielsen
    • Catherine O'Hara
    • Matt Perry
    • Russell Peters
    • Ryan Reynolds
    • Seth Rogen
    • Martin Short
    • Mort Sahl
    • Wayne & Shuster
    • Dave Thomas
    • Doug & Bob Mackenzie (Moranis/Thomas)
    • and of course the entire cast of Trailer Park Boys!
     
  30. Chalkie

    Chalkie One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    I've been getting into trouble from my Canadian spouse for saying "hoser" (channelling Bob & Doug Mackenzie). I'm told that only people over 50 will understand that, and it is naff anyway. My defence is I am trying to assimilate. My Canadian brother-in-law complimented on my use of "eh" recently. +1 rolled eyes and said "don't compliment him, it just makes it worse". I still cannot quite get the low-back merger necessary to adopt the Canadian shift and pronounce "out and about" in a Canadian accent.
     
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  31. luvthabumps

    luvthabumps A Local Ski Pass: Gold

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    rolling your "r"s yet? We found there were many Aussie pronunciations that were misunderstood, so in the end it was just easier to throw a gentle "rrrrr" into some words. Couldn't even give you an example 1 year later LOL
     
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  32. kylep

    kylep Cage rattler Ski Pass: Gold

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    Waterrr. I start doing this whenever I travel to North America!
     
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  33. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    It comes as no surprise that the wettest part of Canada is the Pacific coast region. At least six west coast communities record more than 3 metres of rainfall each year. The first nations villages of Klemtu and Hartley Bay both see more than 4.5 metres and have over 250 rainy days a year, as the climate there has no pronounced wet or dry season, and even in winter there is rarely snowfall to sea level.

    But the rain gauge that sees more water than any other in Canada is at Mitchell Inlet on Moresby Island in the Haida Gwaii archipelago, with a whopping 6000 mm annually. This remote location gets 295 days of rain each year - three out of every four days. These islands, named by colonists as the Queen Charlottes, lie 80 km offshore and within distant view of the Alaska panhandle. Despite its northerly latitude and mountainous interior, coastal areas of Haida Gwaii receive little snow due to the relatively warm currents of the north Pacific. As well as being the wettest part of Canada, in winter it is sometimes the mildest.
     
  34. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    One of the most complex coastlines in the world is the Canadian portion of the northeastern Pacific. This is the 2000 km long Inside Passage, much beloved of cruise ship operators and still very much a busy commercial 'highway'. The Passage runs from Olympia, Washington northward through Puget Sound, past Vancouver and the busy Fraser delta and into the Salish Sea/Strait of Georgia before passing through convoluted passages between the islands that choke the gap between the mainland and Vancouver Island. This route provides relative shelter from the force of the open Pacific, although there are a couple of short gaps that can see exposure to ocean swell from certain directions. The entire region is very mountainous and riven by dozens of fjord-like inlets that reach as much as 100 km inland into the Coast Mountains. Land highways are mostly non existent, and on the mainland side they run out altogether just 100 km north of Vancouver.

    This coast has proved difficult for navigation since the earliest times, with its huge tides and fast currents, and wind channeled through the inlets causing much disruption when they intersect with the main passage. The first nations clans used canoes for transport and only rarely employed sails, mostly on the longer stretches of open water. Even today, this is a challenging area for sailing vessels. Commercial shipping must be under the command of a local pilot at all times, and the training and certification process for these pilots is lengthy and rigorous. There are numerous small fishing and logging communities along the passage that are marine access only, but in general the intensely wet climate and difficult access make this a lightly populated region. The Passage is rich in wildlife, with orcas, dolphins and humpback whales often seen, and of course the famous salmon runs with their accompanying bald eagles and ospreys.
     
  35. KneeDeep

    KneeDeep One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    Sly you will be headhunted by Canadian Tourism if you keep up this standard of writing.
     
  36. Gleno71

    Gleno71 One of Us

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    The fact that, Canadians use the metric system !! Must be a pain for there American friends crossing border when there speedometer in Miles.
    However i believe both countries have there speedometer both in Miles and Km's on there vehicles?
     
  37. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Yes vehicles destined for Canadian market will have km/h prominent and then mph as secondary scale. Newer vehicles have digital speedo that shows whichever units you choose in settings. Mine has an analogue needle but the scale around the speedo's circumference can be set to show kmh or mph.
     
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  38. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    I'm practicing for retirement, KD. Got an exciting second career as a clickbait article writer all lined up.
     
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  39. DidSurfNowSki

    DidSurfNowSki One of them Ski Pass: Gold

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    @sly_karma
    Did you cover the world’s largest island-in-a-lake-on-an-island-in-a-lake-on-an-island?
     
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  40. Charlie

    Charlie Still the most depraved poster here Ski Pass: Gold

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  41. piolet

    piolet Better make it three Ski Pass: Gold

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  42. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    A notable incident in Canadian aviation history is the case of the Gimli Glider. This was a 1983 Air Canada 767 flying from Montreal to Edmonton that ran out of fuel in mid flight at 41,000 feet, but managed to glide to a safe landing nonetheless. The problem was a miscalculation in fuel load by ground crew because of a mixup between pounds and kilograms, which was subsequently accepted by flight crew.

    Because of an existing problem with the tank fuel gauges, the crew relied on the management computers, which indicated sufficient fuel for the flight because the incorrect amount had been entered. When the initial fuel alarms sounded, the pilots elected to divert to Winnipeg. Then both engines failed in short succession and the pilots were forced to seek a closer option. The closed RCAF base at Gimli, Manitoba was proposed as a possibility by the first officer, who has served there during a stint in the military. Even more coincidentally, the captain was an experienced glider pilot and was able to calculate the aircraft's approximate glide rate and determine that Gimli was within reach.

    Further problems were encountered on approach, as the ram air generator did not provide much power for control surface operations due to the low air speed, and the old runway had been converted for use as drag strip - and there was an event in progress. Without main power, the landing gear hydraulics were inoperative and were lowered by gravity alone. This was successful for the main gear, but the nose gear failed to lock in the down position. The large aircraft was virtually silent and there was no radio contact with the old air base to warn of its approach.

    On landing, the pilot braked hard and forced a blowout of some of the main gear tyres. The nose gear collapsed and the resultant drag helped to slow the hurtling aircraft, which of course could not use reverse thrust. A steel barrier set up along the runway to separate the two lanes of the drag strip provided much needed friction and the 767 came to a halt before running out of asphalt or sliding into the drag race crowd. The only injuries sustained by the 69 persons aboard were due to use of the rear inflatable slides which were not long enough to reach the ground because of the collapsed nose gear.

    In the aftermath, the flight crew were suspended and demoted at first, but later reinstated, praised and decorated for their performance. Simulator exercises attempting to replicate the incident resulted in crashes. The aircraft was repaired on site and flown out two days later. It went on to serve Air Canada another 25 years.
     
  43. DidSurfNowSki

    DidSurfNowSki One of them Ski Pass: Gold

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  44. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Grumblebum Ski Pass: Gold

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    I saw this in Air Crash Investigations. It was an amazing feat. If you can chase the episode down it is worth a look.
     
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  45. Marty_McSly

    Marty_McSly What a plonker. Ski Pass: Gold

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  46. skifree

    skifree grey Moderator Ski Pass: Gold

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  47. Chalkie

    Chalkie One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    Amazing. Big love to the pilots who fly us safely whenever we fly!
     
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  48. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Canada has the third largest population of Ukrainian and Ukrainian-descended people in the world - after Russia and Ukraine itself. About 1.4 million Canadians identify as being of Ukrainian descent, roughly 4% of the population.

    Following the opening of the transcontinental rail link in 1885, the government of Canada and the Canadian Pacific Railroad actively sought immigrants to settle the 'empty' land ( no one bothered to ask the indigenous owners their opinion). CPR had been given a square mile of land for every linear mile of track built, so they had land to sell, and of course there would be follow on freight business from the import of supplies and the export of agricultural produce. Canada just wanted to populate the newly accessible land, as population and settlement were seen as a passive defence against American annexation of the west. Ukraine at the time was impoverished and overcrowded, and many people were actively looking for land of their own instead of the essentially feudal land system still in place.

    Starting in 1891, tens of thousands of Ukrainian people came to Canada and took up land in the western provinces. They mostly gathered together in collective communities and these can still be seen today in Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. During the first world war, some 5000 Ukrainians were interned by the govt because their former home had been part of the Austro-Hungarian empire and were thus considered 'enemy aliens'.

    Following the end of hostilities, internment ceased and the federal govt changed the regs to once again permit entry to Ukrainians. A second wave of immigration followed, but the cheap farming land was largely gone, and so most of the second group settled in cities and towns. There were more educated and professionals in this group and they went on to become leaders of the community.

    So if you're wondering why pierogies and cabbage rolls are commonly seen on Canadian menus and tables, it's because someone's great grandparents came out from Ukraine a century or so ago.
     
  49. Chalkie

    Chalkie One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    Canadian +1 has been carrying on about pierogies since we arrived, and had them for lunch last week at Granville Island (I had a German bratwurst with sauerkraut). And we bought some at the Farmer's Market last Saturday, which I am to prepare for dinner this week, with steamed and buttered cabbage (+1 is a heathen and doesn't like sauerkraut) and mashed potatoes. A carb on carb dinner!
     
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  50. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Most of the initial charting of Canada's Pacific Coast was done by Capt. George Vancouver in 1791-94. He was a protege of Capt. Cook and sailed on Cook's second and third voyages. Despite Cook's prodigy status as a navigator and cartographer, he failed to note the large passage that separates a very large island from the mainland. It was of course Vancouver who established this, and subsequently the island was named for him. Juan de Fuca Strait is named after a Greek navigator who sailed with a Spanish expedition in 1592 and claimed to have found the Strait of Anian (ie, the Northwest Passage).

    There was much interest in the Pacific Northwest area in the late 18th century due to its access to Asia, and the abundance of resources such as timber, fish, and fur-bearing animals. The governments of Spain, Britain, the US, and Russia all laid claim to the region, and there was much discussion and negotiation in the ensuing years until the Oregon Treaty of 1846 established the 49th parallel north as the Oregon Territory boundary, and awarded the entirety of Vancouver Island to Britain (the southern end of the island lies south of 49 N). These definitions agreed by government officials in far away offices proved too vague, with several islands not mentioned in the treaty being claimed by both nations. This led to the Pig War of 1859: the San Juan Islands straddle two channels, either of which could be construed as the boundary between Vancouver Island and the north american mainland. (No shots were fired and no one was injured). Even today, the US/Canada border offshore from the opening to the Juan de Fuca Strait is technically in dispute (slight differences in the agreed alignment out to the 200 mile zone). Because concessions would cause precedent in other disagreed marine boundaries (mainly the Gulf of Maine), neither government seems to be seeking a final agreement.
     
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