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Today's fact about Canada

Discussion in 'Canada' started by sly_karma, Feb 10, 2019.

  1. rugbyskier

    rugbyskier One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    Here's Mick Fanning surfing the Eisbachwelle in Munich.

    BTW, sorry for derailing the thread and sending it across the Atlantic.
     
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  2. piolet

    piolet Better make it three Ski Pass: Gold

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    My friends' local.

    So.damned.cold.

    They surf it all winter ffs
     
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  3. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    See post #214 in this thread! About 20% of the planet's fresh water.

    The long skinny glacial-remnant lakes in BC are numerous: Lillooet, Alouette, Stave, Harrison, Nicola, Shuswap, Okanagan (chain of 5 lakes), Slocan, Arrow, Kootenay, Windermere all at least 20 km long and usually 100 or more metres deep in the main basin. Those are just a handful named off the top of my head across the southern third of the province and all comparable or larger than the big storage impoundments of the Snowy scheme. Then you get the huge hydro reservoirs built in the 60s: Williston Lake has a capacity of 74 cubic km, Lake Kinbasket with another 24 km3 (Lake Eucumbene has 5 km3).

    And these BC lakes are tiddlers compared to the seriously big lakes further east and north. The Great Lakes are obvious and well known, but Great Bear and Great Slave Lakes in the NWT are larger than all but two of the Great Lakes. Lake Winnipeg and Lake Winnipegosis are enormous as well, and there are dozens more lakes with over 500 sq km surface area. BC's Williston Lake with its 74 cubic km is ranked 29th overall in Canada.

    Then there are the myriad tiny lakes of the Canadian Shield. These are small pondages formed by moraine as the Laurentian Ice Sheet melted. The Shield is quite flat at the macro level, but small irregularities abound and it appears to be endless low rocky hills from ground level. Tiny lakes connected by small streams meander across the landscape in every direction. There truly are too many to count. Saskatchewan number plates used to proclaim "Land of a Hundred Thousand Lakes"; few would challenge that claim. And the Shield covers northern Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Labrador as well. Adds up to probably over a million small lakes too numerous to name, let alone count. Could be as much water stored there as in the big lakes.
     
  4. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    The electric light bulb was first invented by two Canadians, Henry Woodward and Matthew Evans of Toronto, in 1874. They registered patents in Canada and the US, but were unable to secure sufficient funding to develop their product for commercial production. They were repeatedly ridiculed for such a "useless" invention. In 1879, they sold their patent rights for $5,000 to Thomas Edison, who went on to achieve a certain measure of success with electric light.
     
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  5. gareth_oau

    gareth_oau Pool Room Ski Pass: Gold

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    That's actually a really sad story. A poor reflection on sciety
     
  6. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Happens today too. People sell their intellectual property to corporations because they lack the resources to develop their invention. $5000 in 1879 would be worth around 100K today. Not a lot but something.
     
  7. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Grumblebum Ski Pass: Gold

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    A poor reflection on Edison. He was a bit of a shit.
     
  8. gareth_oau

    gareth_oau Pool Room Ski Pass: Gold

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    I'm not sure of the facts, but he saw an opportunity nobody else would acknowledge? perhaps he could have been a bit kinder to the inventors, and also tried not to calim all the credit
     
  9. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Grumblebum Ski Pass: Gold

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    It's not the only time he pulled a similar stunt.
     
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  10. robbo mcs

    robbo mcs One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    There are many things from the 19th century that seem just plain wrong now. Hard to judge people based upon todays moral standards
     
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  11. gareth_oau

    gareth_oau Pool Room Ski Pass: Gold

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    TBH though, if everyone was poopooing the invention at the time, and Edison stumped up $125,000 (escalated to today's value), on a risk, then that doesnt seem too immoral
     
  12. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Update: Don Cherry was dumped from HNIC earlier this season after racist comments in his show. 84 years old and still working. I think he was probably secretly relieved, didn't know how to quit.
     
  13. KneeDeep

    KneeDeep One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    What will happen to all his suits? You would look good in one of his hand me downs
     
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  14. Telemark Phat

    Telemark Phat Pass the butter Ski Pass: Gold

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    Wow, finally!
     
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  15. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    The city of Winnipeg has long been considered a prime test market for large corporations to trial new products. This small city (three quarters of a million people) is demographically and ethnically representative of the north american market overall and is isolated, both in terms of geography and media outlets. Consumables giant Lever & Kitchen has test marketed products in Winnipeg for more than forty years, and Cherry Pepsi made its debut in the prairie city. McDonalds sold its first ever chicken offering there in 1979. Branded as "McDonalds Chicken & Chips", the crispy boneless chicken sold well and was eventually released to the world as Chicken McNuggets in 1983. Franchisees were so enthusiastic about the poultry product that official release was delayed almost two years until farm and processing supply problems were solved.
     
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  16. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Labatt Memorial Park in London, ON is the world's oldest continually operated baseball field, in use annually since 1877. Although league play has been canceled this season due to the pandemic, the London Majors team played an exhibition game this week against league rivals Guelph in order to maintain their continuous operations status.
     
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  17. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    During the 1940s and 50s, the busiest airport in the world was Gander International in Newfoundland. Aircraft of the day were had limited range and were only able to fly routes between Europe and the eastern seaboard of North America by minimising the Atlantic crossing with fuel stops in Gander and Shannon (Ireland) or Glasgow (Scotland).

    Because of its location both on the cross-Newfoundland rail line and on a great circle route between Boston/New York and Shannon, the Gander airport was built by the Dominion government in 1938 on a "build it and they will come" basis. During WW2 it held a critical role as a refuel base for military aircraft being ferried to the UK. After the war, passenger air travel boomed, making use of the thousands of long, hard surfaced runways constructed for bombers around the world. In its peak year, 1959, Gander handled more than 120 flights a day. In the 1960s, the aircraft industry brought aircraft online with improved range, making the stops in Gander less needed. These days it sees ten or a dozen flights a week, but its two runways of over 3000 m length continue to be fully maintained.

    Gander had another day in the limelight in 2001 when the US closed its airspace minutes after the 9/11 attacks. Dozens of direct flights from Europe were in the air and had to put down in Gander and Halifax as the Canadian government did not want them landing in much more densely populated Toronto and Montreal. 38 aircaft and 6600 passengers and crew spent a few days on the ground in Gander until US airspace reopened. The generous hospitality shown by the people of the small town (9000) was one of the few happy stories to come out of this event and was later dramatized in the Broadway musical 'Come From Away.'
     
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  18. MarzNC

    MarzNC One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    Got to see the musical being performed by a national traveling company last year. It's really good!

    Gander has hosted a few reunions. The biggest was in 2011.

    The musical includes the story of how this couple met. Also the plane piloted by Beverly Bass. People had to stay on board her plane for 27 hours until the town figured out where they could go.

    https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2011/09/11/love_bloomed_in_newfoundland_after_911.html

    https://www.denvercenter.org/news-c...lot-who-found-a-safe-place-to-land-in-gander/
     
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  19. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    The longest bridge in Canada is the 13 km Confederation Bridge that crosses the Northumberland Strait to connect Prince Edward Island to the mainland at Cape Jouriman, New Brunswick. Completed in 1997 at a cost of $1.3 billion, this is the world's longest bridge over ice-covered water.

    Talk of a fixed link connecting PEI to the mainland date back to the 1890s, and surfaced in earnest in the 1950s and 60s with the nation much in favour of mega projects such as the Trans Canada Highway and the St Lawrence Seaway. The federal govt authorized funding for a solid filled causeway in 1968, along with bridge sections to accommodate shipping. Scientific advisers pointed out that the severe and complex tidal flows in the Strait would result in currents through the bridged sections of around 18 knots, making them impassable to commercial shipping for long periods of time each day. The causeway project was dropped and other options explored.

    Interest in a fixed link revived in the mid 80s and the federal government took bids for tunnel, bridge, and hybrid models. The topic became divisive amongst the islanders, and a plebiscite was held in 1987, with 59% of people supporting construction. Another five years passed in design, bidding, legal arguments and environmental assessments. Even the Canadian Constitution had to be amended to remove an obligation to provide rail and steamship connections to PEI - one of the original conditions of Confederation.

    The bridge is constructed of precast concrete sections built on the mainland side and dropped into place by a huge floating lift facility. Each span is 250 m long and the support towers have conical deflectors mounted at water surface level to deflect icebergs.

    Built as a public/private partnership, the Confederation Bridge is a toll crossing, and currently costs almost $50 for a return trip. The five years of construction caused a noticeable boom in employment and a 5% growth in GDP for tiny PEI. An immediate effect following opening was a surge in tourism; visitors to the island increased by over 50%.
     
    #769 sly_karma, Aug 28, 2020
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2020
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  20. person s

    person s Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    a bit of anthrop / lingustics

     
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  21. skifree

    skifree A disciple of the blessed avi giraffe Moderator Ski Pass: Gold

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    A special Canadian product?
     
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  22. Legs Akimbo

    Legs Akimbo Grumblebum Ski Pass: Gold

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    What do they call potato scallops?
     
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  23. person s

    person s Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    I was wondering about that
    also wondering whether they actually have them
     
  24. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    No such thing. But there are various Canadian delicacies such as beaver tails, Nanaimo bars, poutine, KD, butter tarts, candied salmon, Montreal smoked meat, peameal bacon, bannock, and tourtiere.
     
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  25. skifree

    skifree A disciple of the blessed avi giraffe Moderator Ski Pass: Gold

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    What is the origin of the name Canada, is it Spanish?
     
  26. Chalkie

    Chalkie One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    I thought that too, until our neighbour, born and raised in Vancouver, told us just last week that when she was young her grandmother made her something she called "potato smacks" - which are potato scallops/cakes! I was amazed when I heard that. I don't know whether it was an idiosyncratic thing to her family or whether smacks have simply died out in Canada/BC/Vancouver. The name "potato smack" comes up on internet searches, but it looks like it has its origins in regional England (Lancashire? Staffordshire?).

    [And "various delicacies such as KD" :D:D:D]
     
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  27. Chalkie

    Chalkie One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    Believed to have indigenous origins from the St Lawrence Iroquoian word kanata, meaning "village" or "settlement".
     
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  28. skifree

    skifree A disciple of the blessed avi giraffe Moderator Ski Pass: Gold

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    So no relationship to

    Cañada or La Canyada is a Spanish municipality in the comarca of Alt Vinalopó, province of Alicante, Valencian Community.
     
  29. KneeDeep

    KneeDeep One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    To the uninitiated, KD may seem as though it is a struggle meal, or even a last resort. Having said that, it sure is popular. Canadians eat more than 55 per cent more KD than our American counterparts because we know the true value of that golden cheesy powder. This is why we purchase more than 1.7 million packages (out of the 7 million sold) per week collectively.

    This boxed mac n' cheese was technically called "Kraft Macaroni and cheese dinner" but Canadians started calling it Kraft Dinner or KD for short, which resulted in the official name change in 2015 to KD. (A name which is also trademarked.)

    Whether you're on team ketchup, or team plain, you know the importance of KD in Canadian households.
     
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  30. Chalkie

    Chalkie One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    Not that I know!
     
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  31. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Seems to be the accepted etymology.

    Not so much. Remember the earliest settlers spoke francaise, not español.
     
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  32. skifree

    skifree A disciple of the blessed avi giraffe Moderator Ski Pass: Gold

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    Which is why I was puzzled after coming across the Spanish reference.
     
    #782 skifree, Aug 29, 2020
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2020
  33. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    To add to the mix, the Spanish were active on the west coast in the earliest years of European exploration. From their trading ports on the Pacific coast of Mexico, they sent expeditions and settlers north into today's California and then further north. The important water route around the southern end of Vancouver Island to access the ports of Seattle and Vancouver is the Juan de Fuca Strait, named for a Greek navigator in the service of the Spanish court in the late 16th century. As with so many explorations of the day, his quest was to find the fabled Strait of Anian, aka the Northwest Passage. Juan de Fuca returned to Spain convinced that the passage he'd found went so far that it must be the elusive sea connection to Europe (Van Isle is 600 km long so he can be forgiven for following the strait for a while before concluding it was the real thing). Until the last 18th century, the Spanish were the only European power to have any lasting influence on the west coast.

    Spanish place names endure on the maps and charts we use today. Quadra Island was named for navigator Juan Francisco de la Bodega y Quadra, who made several expeditions to the coast of BC, setting up residence for a time at Nootka on the west coast of Vancouver Island. He interacted with American and British navigators of the time, Vancouver in particular, and charted the coast well into today's Alaska to about 59N. You'll also see Sonora Island (Quadra's ship), Cortes Island, Galiano Island, Valdes Island and Marina Island, all names that have endured since the 1790s.
     
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  34. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    The Hudson's Bay Company has long traded wool point blankets to indigenous people in exchange for pelts for the fur trade that was the core of their north american business. By 1700, blankets accounted for over 60% of all trade goods. From the early nineteenth century onward, they were produced with four coloured stripes (red, yellow, green and indigo) that were easily produced from good colour fast dyes of the day. They were prized for their warmth and versatility and were often made into rugged winter clothing by indigenous people and voyageurs.

    Today, the striped HBC point blanket is a classic Canadian symbol, produced in the UK as it always was. The company's logo and corporate colour scheme uses the same four coloured stripes on a white background as the blankets. New HBC blankets cost 400-600 dollars depending on size, and there are occasional commemorative releases. There is a busy collector market, with old blankets or rare blankets fetching several thousand dollars.
     
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  35. gareth_oau

    gareth_oau Pool Room Ski Pass: Gold

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    there's a tv drama series on Netflix called Frontier about the eqrly days of HBC's monopoly

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4686698/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_3
     
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  36. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    For almost 200 years, HBC was effectively the government of the northern half of the continent. Their head office was in Montreal yet their canoe and mule train network transported furs all the way back from the Pacific coast and the subarctic.

    Showing some of the classism of the era, HBC used mostly French Canadians for the cross country canoe flotilla, the famous voyageurs. The actual fur trapping was done by indigenous people. The trading posts in the wilderness (usually labeled 'fort' or 'factory') were invariably led by an anglophone, often a Scot. HBC ships often stopped in the Orkney Islands for supplies before the crossing to the Baffin Strait, and mnay young men were recruited there. The bleak windswept Islands made their inhabitants well suited for life in the cold Hudsons Bay climate, and many of the young Orcadians went on to serve out their entire career with HBC and rose to become the factor, the chief trader and leader of the post.

    When HBC merged with its rival, the Northwest Company, in 1821, many duplicate posts were closed down. But rather than heading back to the Orkneys, most of the men stayed and settled. To this day there are communities in Northern Saskatchewan and Manitoba that trace their ancestry back to young Orkneymen who got on a ship hoping for adventure and a break from the grinding poverty of the islands.
     
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  37. Chalkie

    Chalkie One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    We are a very HBC observant household here:

     
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  38. main street

    main street Doing what I want. Ski Pass: Gold

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    Fritters.

    :out:
     
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  39. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    At just over 50 m in height, Niagara Falls does not rate at all in the world list of waterfalls, but it carries the greatest water volume of any falls in North America. The Niagara River is the connecting channel between Lakes Erie and Ontario, and thus most of the outflow volume of the Great Lakes pours over the falls. Peak flows in late spring can reach 6000 cubic metres per second.

    There is a level/flow control structure above the falls that adjusts flow through the hydroelectric generators, with flow being halved at night to conserve water for the higher demand daytime periods. The control structure is part of an international treaty that has regulated power generation, access, flow rates and river levels since the 1950s.

    There are actually three falls, separated by islands in the river channel. The international border runs along the river and uses the midpoint of one island as a defining line. Horseshoe Falls on the Canadian side of the river is an astounding 800 m wide, with the American Falls a further 300 m wide.

    Tourism has driven heavy development around both sides of the falls, with the twin towns of Niagara Falls, New York and Niagara Falls, Ontario both bristling with hotels, viewpoints, casinos and other amenities. Several bridges span the river, and there are ziplines, boat tours and a 'behind the falls' tunnel and tour. The most direct driving route from the heavily developed Greater Toronto Area to the US border crosses the Niagara River just 20 km from Buffalo, New York and so vast numbers of people pass near the Falls every day. Unsurprisingly, the Falls are the most visited tourist destination in both New York and Ontario.
     
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  40. Beerman

    Beerman One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    Yep can understand why. We were there Sept 2013, weather was perfect. Niagara on the lake a highlight of the area. Behind the falls was good, as was Maid of the Mist boat ride. Must see IMO.
     
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  41. Slalom

    Slalom A Local Ski Pass: Gold

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    Yeah it’s great. Was there last year.
     
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  42. main street

    main street Doing what I want. Ski Pass: Gold

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  43. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    ^ do not like
     
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  44. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Although almost 200 km inland from open ocean, the village of Stewart, BC is the most northerly point on Canada's Pacific coast. It is also Canada's most northerly ice-free port (56°N), situated on salt water at the head of the long narrow fjord known as Portland Canal. The west coast maritime climate is considerably more mild than its Atlantic counterpart, where icebergs and frozen harbours can be encountered at latitudes as low as 46°N (Cape Breton region of Nova Scotia).

    The US/Canada border follows the centreline of the fjord and then heads into the wild St Elias mountains, leaving Stewart and its neighbour community of Hyder, Alaska separated, with passport control required to travel from one to the other. US families living in Hyder (population 65) send their kids the 2 km to school in Stewart and buy their fuel and groceries there as well. Due to extremely mountainous terrain, there is no road connection to the rest of the Alaska Panhandle, and supplies come by road from BC suppliers to Stewart. In winter this highway is a months-long battle against avalanches due to the enormous snowfall - Stewart gets an average of 600 cm a year at sea-level. The peaks thousands of metres above receive vastly more.

    Currently, the two towns are petitioning their respective governments for an exemption to the border closure so that all kids may attend school. A cross-border COVID bubble, as it were.

    To complicate matters further, the near-ghost town of Premier, BC is only accessible by road from Hyder, requiring two border crossings in each direction for the out-and-back trip from Stewart. All three villages are former silver mining communities and in normal times are a popular tourist attraction for American and Canadian visitors alike.
     
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  45. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Canada has a small but significant black population, with roughly 4% of people identifying as black in the most recent census. Many are descended from former slaves freed by the British and then obliged to move north following the American revolution. The other major group are more recent immigrants from the Caribbean, principally Jamaica.

    Nova Scotia was the principal destination for Loyalists in the 1770s, and to this day this province has a greater portion of its population identifying as black than any other. The Greater Toronto Area is the most popular area for people of Jamaican descent, but there are also signficant black communities in Montreal, Saint John NB, and Vancouver.
     
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  46. MarzNC

    MarzNC One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    Have there been many African immigrants from former French colonies?

    Did many of the slaves from the American South who escaped to Canada stay there after the U.S. Civil war was over? Every American school kid learns about the Underground Railway.
     
  47. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Numbers are vague of course because the Underground Railway was clandestine, estimates range from 10,000 to 30,000. Safe to say the great majority stayed on in Canada. In earlier years, very few would have risked returning because of the possibility of being recaptured. In the time following the Civil War, it would have been unappealing to return to a nation devastated by years of widespread warfare.
     
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  48. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    Absolutely. Haiti is a prominent source of Caribbean region migrants, and many francophone Africans choose Canada as their preferred destination because of its official biligual policy. Former Governor General Micaelle Jean originally came to Canada from Haiti as a refugee and served her adopted country with great distinction.
     
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  49. gareth_oau

    gareth_oau Pool Room Ski Pass: Gold

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    Tht number is smaller than I expected, especially when south of the border the number is 13.4%
     
  50. sly_karma

    sly_karma Old n' Crusty Ski Pass: Gold

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    More diverse mix in Canada I guess. The leading visible minorities are:
    • South Asian (India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka): 6%
    • Chinese: 5%
    • Black: 4%
    • Indigenous: 5%