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What backpacks are y'all using?

Discussion in 'Backcountry' started by plazzo, Apr 10, 2019.

  1. oldgeezer

    oldgeezer One of Us

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    Grandpa oh and computer programmer too.
    I have a Deuter Airlite 28 for day hikes, liking the airflow ventilation, and for another backpack I obtained a Ventra Mainframe for tbe same effect, disliking the sticky sweaty back others always seem to result in.
     
  2. axellotta

    axellotta Hard Yards

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    For multi day trips I’d wholeheartedly recommend Aarn Peak Aspiration (45l) with expedition balance pockets(15l). Once you have tried this setup you’ll never go back to a traditional rucksack. It’s also light, durable, waterproof and has integrated ski straps and ice axe holders etc. I have also recently purchased an Aarn Liquid Agility 30l day pack. Pretty exxy, but superbly built and already setup with integrated ski and helmet straps etc.
     
    Peagreenboat likes this.
  3. sidetrack

    sidetrack One of Us

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    I’m just wondering how this pack goes while skiing downhill and turning. Does it allow the hips to move freely or does it feel like it locks the lower torso up a bit. I tried one on today and it was really comfortable.
     
    Chaeron likes this.
  4. Peagreenboat

    Peagreenboat Addicted

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    I've been trialling an Aarn Peak Aspiration, with the intention to go up to a pack capable of a more. It looks stupid, but the no pressure under the arm is great. I've had lymph nodes out, so nearly all packs have caused me issues and possible lymphaedama risk. The pack is great for skiing in because the load can move suspended across the back. I'm still planning on skiing in a few times more because getting the pack to fit takes a lot of work. It has been great in terms of not having to take it on and off in terms of having everything up front in the front packs as I heat up moving, which I have really liked but packing takes a completely new form I haven't quite go the knack of. Not everyones cup of tea, but is interesting. The Guiding Light is the ski/ rock climbing oriented version with up to 20 odd litres carried on the front.
     
  5. Peagreenboat

    Peagreenboat Addicted

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    I didn't feel restricted at all, am far more upright and always found pressure pulling me forward with traditional packs, that is all eliminated but it does take a hell of a lot of tweaking, esp if you have irregular body/issues. I love the freedom of the pack moving, which is why it is so useful for climbing.
     
    Chaeron likes this.
  6. Peagreenboat

    Peagreenboat Addicted

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    Also, carrying the ski's was easy down the sides of the Peak Aspiration. Needed to tweak them again but the material will not sneeze at the metal edges.
     
  7. axellotta

    axellotta Hard Yards

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    Completely agree that the Aarn system takes a little bit to get used to, as far as it looking stupid I’m not sure I agree with you, it’s all in the eye of the beholder I guess. In any case, like you it took me quite a bit of tweaking to get it what I thought was right. I actually recently took it back in the see Tim at Backpacking Light and in 10 minutes he had increased the comfort and function 50% better again. If this is an option for you, I’d highly recommend it.
     
  8. Chaeron

    Chaeron One of Us Ski Pass: Gold

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    When I ski with it the impact is weight only - No noticeable impact on lower torso movement.

    I wear the ‘hip’ belt quite high up on the pelvis, with the front of the strap mainly above the hip-bone, and this means that the back of the belt is above the buttocks, so this means muscle and leg movement is not impacted.

    The strap across the chest along with the mouldable hip belt means that the pack is rotationally stable while on the downhill, as long as I keep it’s centre of gravity low by putting some of the heavier stuff in lower dow.

    The pack is comfortable like this if I don’t overweight it. I’m about 176cm and about 70kg. With the pack at 17kg or under skiing downhill or turning is not an issue.

    18kg & upwards I have a distinct sense of compromised downhill skiing and turning. Ideally for me skiing with 16kg or less means turns become easier.
     
  9. blowfin

    blowfin One of Us Ski Pass: Silver

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    The OP is probably long gone, but I won an Osprey Mutant 52 last year, it's a mountaineering pack and much lighter than the Kamber range of packs. It'd probably fit the bill. It's only been used for travel and an overnight hike so far, but it's very comfortable and has everything you'd want for touring. A-frame ski carry, Helmet carry, front facing axe loops and a few other attachments.
     
    nezumi and Chaeron like this.
  10. nezumi

    nezumi One of Us

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    My mind has turned to potential pack needs lately, but with a different use in mind - On our trip to Perisher this year I will have myself, my snowboard, my toddler and his snowboard. While I don't anticipate having to carry so much in-bounds that I need a pack, I am starting to think that having one to carry at least one of the snowboards will make things infinitely easier, as I don't anticipate growing an extra set of arms between now and then.

    Whatever I get will probably only be used for this purpose, and maybe for small day-trips splitboarding around Mt Stirling or similar, but not for real backcountry use.

    Any recommendations on a small (<20L), affordable pack that has snowboard carrying capability? I've looked at options like the Kamber but found them too big, heavy and expensive.