Advice needed Which skis for me.

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Sbooker, Jul 8, 2018.

  1. Sbooker

    Sbooker Hard Yards

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    After many trips hiring boots my wife and I have just taken the plunge and bought our own ski boots. We both ended up with Salomon - me the X Pro 100 (2019) and Saloman X Pro 80 (2018) for my wife. We tried on many different boots from two different boot fitters (who both took heaps of time and paid plenty of attention and made many adjustments). We tried boots from Lange, Atomic, Dalbello, Head etc.
    What one ski would people recommend for us? We are from Brisbane and are in our 40’s (still pretty fit) and do only ski a few days here in Oz each winter but generally have a trip of a few weeks skiing in the northern hemisphere each year. This year we are skiing in Austria and Italy but the last few seasons we’ve skied in US and Canada. About half of our skiing is on groomers but we like to ski bumps, fresh snow when we can. We can manage skiing ok in powder with dirty old rental skis. We expect to ski in Japan in the next season or two and I have ideas of doing some ski clinics to make us better ‘off piste’ skiers.
    There is no chance we will buy more than one pair of skis each so we want to get the right one. The ski shop suggested we look at the Atomic Vantage 85 or 95 (2018) for me. They quoted $599 without bindings.
    For my wife (who probably is happier on mostly groomed snow) they suggested Atomic Vantage X 77C (2019). They come with bindings and the quote was $699.
    We also looked at Salmon QST skis.

    The other thing is do we really want to go down the road of lugging skis around the world as we will still have to rent gear for the kids? I’m a little concerned about ski security (as in getting stolen while at the ski hill).

    Any tips, suggestions or advice would be really appreciated.
    Thanks in advance.
    Simon
     
  2. Nozawaman

    Nozawaman A Local
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    If it was me at your age , I would hire on mountain where I was skiing .
    It might work out to cost a bit more , but you can swap out to suit conditions , ski the latests models every season , you don't have to lug skis around as you have mentioned . No Brainer !!!!!
     
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  3. chriscross

    chriscross One of Us
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    Picked up the Salomon Qst 92 for this season after recommendations from 2 trusted Melb ski shops. Only been on for 1 day so far but very pleased with them.
     
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  4. Froff Life

    Froff Life A Local
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    It's tough to buy a one quiver ski that does it all, bumps, groomers and pow. Especially for both hemispheres. I'd say the width you would be looking at is between 85-95mm so the Vantages would be OK.
    Can you get up to your local Aus resort this winter during some demo days? Best way to suss out multiple skis and try before you buy.
     
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  5. Jacko4650

    Jacko4650 One of Us

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    Do it. Take the plunge. You will adapt to travelling with ski bags, I think they are an advantage - oversize baggage is rarely busy, almistaa personal service IMO. I bought carving skis first but cannot believe the freedom and flexibility of getting All Mountain skis a few seasons ago. Wow, what a difference. No downside on groomers at all but far more options off piste. Now aiming to go longer and wider. My current Solomon Q98's are just so flexible. Go on, do it. You won't look back and will save big bucks in the long run.
     
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  6. rowdyflat

    rowdyflat Hard Yards

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    Reckon the Line supernatural 92 is good,but agree living in Brisbane and travelling OS prolly hire.
     
  7. MickM

    MickM One of Us
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    On the money with the width. As Jacko said, just do it!!

    I too made the change from carvers and they are so much more versatile esp in chopped up conditions. I have the 2017 Atomic Vantage 90cti. They are quite stiff, but I like that on groomers.
     
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  8. dr80

    dr80 One of Us
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    There's a couple of downsides of hiring for me. And perhaps demo-ing.
    Hiring - 1. often a queue of other people hiring. Especially if there's been an unexpected change of conditions overnight and you want to swap skis in the morning. 2. You may not have enough time on them to get a ski really dialled.

    I've got skis which just took time to fully understand and just keep getting better with time on them; and others that need detuning but once right and I'm in-sync with them are awesome.

    Hence demoing - I'm not sure the ski you like first go ends up being the best down the track.

    *I'd always go wider, 95 - 105mm, for an all mountain ski, especially if mostly for O.S.
     
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  9. MarzNC

    MarzNC Hard Yards

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    Having done plane trips with my boots with and without skis, there are definitely advantages both ways. With a good ski bag or hardcase with wheels, adding one double bag to the luggage is not a big deal.

    I enjoyed the women's Vantage 85 rented as demo skis and during a free demo day. The day I used them this past season was on groomers as well as fresh ungroomed snow (U.S. northeast). Seemed pretty versatile. That was during a short trip where I only brought my boots. The Vantage 85 was one of the mid-80s models available at a free demo day in the northeast a couple years ago that also included Rossi Temptation 84 and Nordica Belle 88.

    The Salomon QST Myriad 85 is a pretty forgiving ski. Spent a day on a pair during late season conditions at Powder Mountain.

    I know women who are intermediates who like the Head Total Joy. I did too during a demo day, but opted to go narrower and got the Absolut Joy because I also have all-mountain skis.
     
  10. Froff Life

    Froff Life A Local
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    My partner is on the Head Absolute Joy and loves it. Shes an intermediate skier and the ski is really helping her progress and nail her parallel carve turns on piste. Great ski
     
  11. Sbooker

    Sbooker Hard Yards

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    Can anyone advise what the difference is between the Atomic Vantage C and CTI please? Also how would these compare to the Salomon QST skis?
     
  12. Froff Life

    Froff Life A Local
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  13. MickM

    MickM One of Us
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    Re the Atomic C V CTI, CTI has metal backbone. ie better stability at speed, better in icy conditions but less forgiving in bumps & boilerplate bumps.

    not sure about Salomon QST

    My 2c, don't get hung up on brands at first. Work out the type of ski you want ie:
    Stiffness (metal or not)
    Width
    Length
    Sidecut (radius)
    Rocker, etc
    Then pick brand for that type of ski
     
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  14. Marty_McSly

    Marty_McSly Backwards to the future!
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    The Vantage C has carbon but no metal. The CTi has both carbon and titanal layers.

    To amplify what MickM said, the CTi will be more "damp" or damped in its performance, the C will be more "playful" or springy.

    Think of a car's spring with and without a damper (also known, wrongly, as shock absorber).
     
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  15. Sbooker

    Sbooker Hard Yards

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    Ok. So the dirty old rental skis that I would usually get (like the ones under) would have metal in them?
    And how wide generally are the standard rental items?
     
  16. MickM

    MickM One of Us
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    Most rentals I suspect will not be too stiff (no metal). Aimed at beginner crowd.

    Unless of course you rent higher end or demo skis.

    As others have said, CarveMan will surely be along soon with expert input!!
     
  17. FatBoyDave

    FatBoyDave One of Us
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    Depends where you hire, what they have in stock, could be anything from a 78mm to a 106mm.
     
  18. Sbooker

    Sbooker Hard Yards

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    We've never rented the higher end stuff. From memory the width has always been fairly narrow. I would be guessing under 80mm.
     
  19. Nozawaman

    Nozawaman A Local
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    All the more reason to hire ...try as many as you like BUT you need to get the top shelf package otherwise a waste of time and money .
     
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  20. PG2736

    PG2736 Hard Yards

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    Volkl 90eight. Fantastic all round ski. They are also really light so great for travelling with.
     
  21. MarzNC

    MarzNC Hard Yards

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    Regular rentals will not only be on the narrow side, they will usually have more use. When I rent, it's usually for a powder day. But at Powder Mountain a couple seasons ago I skied one weekend when I only had my boots. First day I did the standard rental because off-piste was not going to worth it because of the snow conditions. But with warm conditions, the Salomon XDrive @75 underfoot were no fun at all even on groomers. The next day I rented "Performance" skis for a bit more width and skis designed for intermediate/advanced skiers. Those were Salomon QST Myriad 85. Not only wider, they were in better shape. And the tech bothered to check whether or not they needed wax before giving them to me. (I'm an older advanced skier, not aggressive.)

    Agree that it's worth some research before making a purchase. Demo'ing being the best idea of course. But do not need to buy the latest and greatest. New skis from the previous year or two would be fine.
     
  22. MarzNC

    MarzNC Hard Yards

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    Can't not say it . . . now that you have invested in ski boots, are you going to consider investing a little time and money in lessons? What I've found after starting to do lessons for an advanced skier after knee rehab several years ago is that now which skis I'm using doesn't make as much difference. I can ski 8+ inches of powder on carvers or groomers on powder skis. It means that my all-mountain skis are very versatile and having a One-Ski-Quiver is possible for a trip that involves a plane.
     
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  23. Hermannator

    Hermannator Addicted

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    ^This. Used to ski powder with straight, 60mm under-foot planks. Technique made it possible.

    Get some all-mtn skis online (~80mm under-foot, <20m radius, no taller than you) but by all means do some demo days and go with what feels right to you.
     
  24. MarzNC

    MarzNC Hard Yards

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    Warning: info below more for an intermediate women who skis mostly on groomers. Based on my experience about ten years ago as I started skiing more regularly after getting my daughter on skis. Learned to ski as a teen for a couple seasons but skied very little for a few decades. Always had my own boots when skiing as an adult.

    My first purchase based on a demo during a trip to Tahoe was a Rossi model that was 75 underfoot, 127-75-108. That trip included a 3-morning ski clinic on that model as demo skis. I was either an advanced intermediate or low advanced. With the wide shovel, had plenty of fun in up to about 6 inches of fresh powder at Alta during annual late season trips with my daughter (elementary school) to meet up with friends. Could enjoy skiing 2-3 runs off-piste in the mornings with friends in good conditions at destination resorts. Happily used those skis for five seasons when I was getting in about 25 days, including a mid-season adults-only trip to a destination resort at a big mountain and a late season week at Alta.

    The brands that I found fun as a petite intermediate 10 years ago were Rossignol, Dynastar, and K2. Later on as I got more days on snow and improved, Blizzard and other brands got into the mix based mostly on free demo days. I also spent money on a "personal demo day" at a destination resort in the Rockies to check out 5-6 models of skis before buying the original Black Pearl (88mm) in 2012 (used one season by someone else). I learn a lot from demo'ing about what I don't like since there are plenty of options that are fun. The only brand that I would never consider for a purchase is Volkl because they are too stiff. After working with instructors and doing more ski conditioning for a few years, I can bend a Volkl but have no reason to spend money to have to work hard making turns.

    For me, there were a couple factors for choosing from the Head Joy line a few years ago. The construction makes them very light to carry from the parking lot. Being petite and often skiing with kids of my friend at my home mountain where I use the AJs, that matters. I like the Total Joys as well, but had all-mountain skis so didn't need another pair at mid-80s underfoot. The AJs and Total Joys come with bindings. Not system bindings on a track so not really "demo bindings" and relatively lightweight. Not having to make a decision about what bindings to buy made things just a bit easier to go ahead and make a purchase when I saw a good price during the off-season.
     
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  25. Funky

    Funky One of Us

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    I'm not the best to provide advice, given you are hitting the one ski quiver thang... you are wanting to tick a lot of boxes, and I'm not sure you really can. ie everything will be a compromise.

    So my question is to you (to help those who know better), is how much do you want to ski moguls relative to the other things? eg, you also said fatter skis (95 to 105) mainly for o/s, which would also presumably be longer / have a rocker? Dunno???? ie I'm not sure how compatible these are really with moguls. I say that as a complete hack, who struggles with moguls and is blaming his tools, not his skiing ability...
     
  26. FatBoyDave

    FatBoyDave One of Us
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    I would buy one pair of all mountain style skis and hire for those one off big powder days in Japan*.
    For your wife, something ~75-85mm underfoot.
    For yourself, something a bit wider (based on what you've described) 85-95mm underfoot and a little bit of metal but not too much. Ideally you want a "goldilocks" ski, not soo stiff, not too soft. If you can't demo, do some reading and find someone that's reviewed that's a similar height, weight and skis the same sort of terrain to yourself. What some gun hard charging 20 something loves is more than likely not going to be the best choice for you...
    Atomic Vantage and Salomon QST are both very good skis and would be good choices (IMO). If I had to pick one of the two I'd choose the Salomons but note they come in many different models...

    Other advice.. Buy yourself a combination ski lock for peace of mind. Only costs $15-$20 and takes up no room in your pocket. Takes under 20 seconds to put on and off. Stops people "accidentally" taking your skis and poles.
    Buy a good ski bag on wheels. The douchebag is an excellent option for overseas travel. It's not the cheapest but:
    - it's light, some of the bags with lots of padding and compartments can be pretty heavy before you've even put anything in them (Burton).
    - it rolls up into a tiny bag once you've taken all your stuff out of it. Easy to store in your hotel room.
    - It's pretty durable. I've had mine for a few years now.
    Consider how you are going to travel with your ski boots.. . The golden rule is to take them as carry on, so maybe invest in a nice carry on bag for them?


    *Who am I kidding, I'd buy a pair for everyday of the week...:whistle:
     
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  27. Sbooker

    Sbooker Hard Yards

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    Thanks for the comments and advice. I think we'll make sure we demo a few first and then buy.
    Incidentally would it be fair to assume that buying skis in Europe would be roughly the same cost as buying in Oz (allowing for the exchange rate of course)?
     
  28. Froff Life

    Froff Life A Local
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    Lol god no. You should be able to get them much cheaper in Europe. Only issue is transporting them back to Aus and having to factor in the extra luggage.
     
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  29. Sbooker

    Sbooker Hard Yards

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    Really? Cheaper in Europe?
    What is the reason for that? Larger market?
     
  30. Joysticks

    Joysticks First Runs

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    After owning my own skis for the last several years, anytime I've gone to rent a so called "Premium" package be it from Whistler or Japan, I've always thought to myself, why did I bother! Perhaps I've been unlucky but much of the time they don't seem to be well looked after even in the higher end rental packages. Also, by the time you've rented for a couple of weeks over a couple of seasons, they pretty much pay for themselves. 95mm-100mm in Japan seems to work well in varied conditions except for deep pow, just my 2c.

    Whatever happens, have fun :).
     
  31. Froff Life

    Froff Life A Local
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    Yep larger market means more competition and lower prices, along with a wider selection. A lot of skis manufactures are based in Europe including Atomic, Blizzard, Dynastar, Fischer & Rossignol. Ex-demo or good quality ex-rental skis are also much easier to find.
     
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  32. DPS Driver

    DPS Driver One of Us

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    I sell skis for a partial living. Very good skis at that.

    Based on your requirement I would forget about buying for the time being. The mere fact you asked the question you did and stated your concerns, are the very reason you need to be exposed to more skis, both make, model and specific use.

    The mere fact you tried on so many different boots indicates to me that you ran the process, as the boot fitter should have looked at your foot and provided one or two, maybe three tops boots that suit your foot. This could also indicate that you had trouble deciding on the right boot. Maybe maybe not. If yes, then you're going to have even more trouble deciding on the right ski, hence your post on this forum. You're scared of making the wrong decision because you can't try them on as you did a boot.

    What happens if you get the wrong ski? Bugger you're stuck with it and you'll make it work for you or not.

    Nozawaman had the right suggestion for you and it pains me to say it but just keep renting for a bit longer or demoing. Find the ski you like then make your move. You've got time when OS, so make it the right ski for your destination.

    Then you will have allayed your fears and the next step is learning how to make your skis not get stolen when on a mountain.